2013–14 EHF Cup

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EHF Cup
Max-schmeling-halle berlin.jpg
The Max-Schmeling-Halle in Berlin, venue of the Final four tournament
Tournament information
Sport Handball
Dates 7 September 201318 May 2014
Teams 63 (Qualification stage)
16 (Group stage)
7 (Knockout stage)
Final positions
Champions Hungary Pick Szeged (1st title)
Runners-up France Montpellier AHB
Tournament statistics
Matches played 58
Goals scored 3249 (56.02 per match)
Attendance 167304 (2885 per match)
Top scorer(s) Slovenia Dragan Gajić (72 goals)
← 2012–13 2014–15 →

The 2013–14 EHF Cup was the 33rd edition of the EHF Cup and the second edition since the merger of the EHF Cup with the EHF Cup Winners' Cup. In the present format, the tournament began in early September with three knockout qualifying rounds, which concluded by late November. The 16 surviving teams were then allocated into four groups of four, where teams played against each other home-and-away in a round-robin format. The four group winners and four runners-up qualied to the quarter-finals, with each of the quarter-final winners proceeding to the Final 4 tournament played in May 2014.[1] However, because the hosts of the Final 4 tournament, Füchse Berlin, finished the group stage among the group winners, they have clinched the direct ticket to the final weekend and decided that only three quarter-finals were played for the remaining spots in the final tournament as only the top three second-placed teams qualified to the quarter-finals.[2] The final tournament was won by Hungarian side Pick Szeged.

Bids for the Final 4 venue[edit]

There were a total of seven bids submitted to the EHF for hosting the 2013–14 EHF Cup final four tournament that will take place in May 2014.[1] The list of bidders consists of five clubs participating in the 2013–14 EHF Cup and two external stakeholders.[1] In order to host the final four tournament a venue must fulfill a set of criteria that reflects the nature of a high-profile international club event such as the EHF Cup Finals.[1] The decision who will host the tournament was decided by the EHF and its marketing arm EHF Marketing GmbH.[1]

On 5 December 2013 in Vienna, Austria the EHF President Jean Brihault signed an official contract with Füchse Berlin's manager Bob Henning for organization of the final four tournament, which will take place between 17–18 May 2014.[3] The four games of the finals will be organized in the Max-Schmeling-Halle in the German capital Berlin.[3] The German organizers expect at least 10,000 people for each day of the final weekend.[3]

Final four venue Host
Team Venue City Capacity
AEK Athens Olympic Hall Athens, Greece 18,500
Meshkov Brest Minsk Arena Minsk, Belarus 15,000
Montpellier Park&Suites Arena Montpellier, France 9,000
Füchse BerlinHost Max-Schmeling-Halle Berlin, Germany 8,700
Porsche Arena Stuttgart, Germany 6,500
London GD Copper Box Arena London, United Kingdom 6,000
Coque Arena Luxembourg, Luxembourg 5,400

Overview[edit]

Team allocation[edit]

The labels in the parentheses show how each team qualified for the place of its starting round:[4]

  • 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, etc.: League position
  • ECL: Transferred from the EHF Champions League
    • QS: Losers from the qualification tournaments
    • WC: Losers from the wildcard matches
Round 3
Germany TSV Hannover-Burgdorf (5th) Slovakia Tatran Prešov (ECL QS) Austria Alpla HC Hard (ECL QS) Germany Füchse Berlin (ECL WC)
Spain Ademar León (4th) Greece AEK Athens (ECL QS) Romania HCM Constanţa (ECL QS) Hungary Pick Szeged (ECL WC)
Denmark Aarhus (3rd) Serbia Vojvodina (ECL QS) Norway Elverum (ECL QS) France Montpellier (ECL WC)
Round 2
Spain Aragón (5th) Russia Kaustik Volgograd (6th) Portugal Benfica (2nd) Belarus SKA Minsk (2nd)
France Chambéry (4th) Hungary Csurgó (3rd) Portugal Sporting (3rd) Greece Diomidis Argous (2nd)
France Nantes (5th) Switzerland Kadetten Schaffhausen (2nd) Sweden IFK Kristianstad (2nd) Slovakia Sporta Hlohovec (2nd)
Denmark Skjern (4th) Switzerland Pfadi Winterthur (3rd) Sweden LUGI HF (3rd) Luxembourg Esch (ECL QS)
Denmark Mors-Thy (5th) Croatia Nexe Našice (2nd) Republic of Macedonia Strumica (3rd) Turkey Beşiktaş (ECL QS)
Slovenia Maribor Branik (4th) Croatia Poreč (3rd) Serbia Partizan (2nd) Bosnia and Herzegovina Borac Banja Luka (ECL QS)
Russia SKIF Krasnodar (3rd) Romania SMD Bacău (2nd) Ukraine Portovik (2nd) Netherlands KRAS/Volendam (ECL QS)
Russia Medvedi Perm (4th) Romania Caraș Severin Reșița (3rd) Norway ØIF Arendal (2nd)
Round 1
Hungary Tatabánya (4th) Israel Maccabi Tel Aviv (1st) Luxembourg Handball Käerjeng (2nd) Estonia Pölva Serviti (1st)
Switzerland TSV St. Gallen (4th) Israel Maccabi Rishon LeZion (2nd) Montenegro Lovćen (1st) Bulgaria Dobrudja (1st)
Norway Fyllingen Håndball (3rd) Slovakia Sporta Hlohovec (2nd) Iceland Haukar (1st) Kosovo Prishtina (1st)
Belarus Meshkov Brest (3rd) Turkey Ankaraspor (2nd) Czech Republic Ronal Jičín (1st) United Kingdom London GD (1st)
Austria Bregenz (2nd) Netherlands OCI-Lions (2nd) Belgium Achilles Bocholt (1st) Lithuania Klaipėda Dragunas (1st)

Qualification stage[edit]

Round 1[edit]

Teams listed first played the first leg at home. Some teams agreed to play both matches in the same venue. Highlighted teams qualified into the second round.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Meshkov Brest Belarus 59–43 Israel Maccabi Rishon LeZion 25–19 34–24[A]
Sporta Hlohovec Slovakia 57–52 Switzerland TSV St. Otmar St. Gallen 29–21 28–31
OCI-Lions Netherlands 51–66 Iceland Haukar 33–36[B] 18–30
Ronal Jičín Czech Republic 72–30 Bulgaria Dobrudja 35–15 37–15[C]
Handball Käerjeng Luxembourg 56–57 Lithuania Klaipėda Dragunas 30–30 26–27
Tatabánya Hungary 65–52 Belgium Achilles Bocholt 30–22 35–30
London GD United Kingdom 32–82 Turkey Ankaraspor 14–44[D] 18–38
Maccabi Tel Aviv Israel 67–64 Montenegro Lovćen 37–35 30–29[E]
Pölva Serviti Estonia 49–62 Norway Fyllingen Håndball 27–30 22–32
Prishtina Kosovo 50–63 Austria Bregenz 22–28 28–35
Notes
  1. ^ The second leg match between Meshkov Brest and Maccabi Rishon LeZion was played in Brest, Belarus, with Maccabi Rishon LeZion being the official hosts.[5]
  2. ^ The first leg match between OCI-Lions and Haukar was played in Hafnarfjörður, Iceland, with OCI-Lions being the official hosts.[6]
  3. ^ The second leg match between Ronal Jičín and Dobrudja was played in Jičín, Czech Republic, with Dobrudja being the official hosts.[7]
  4. ^ The first leg match between London GD and Ankaraspor was played in Ankara, Turkey, with London GD being the official hosts.[8]
  5. ^ The second leg match between Maccabi Tel Aviv and Lovćen was played in Ra'anana, Israel, with Lovćen being the official hosts.[9]

Round 2[edit]

Teams listed first played the first leg at home. Some teams agreed to play both matches in the same venue. Highlighted teams qualified into the third round.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
IFK Kristianstad Sweden 62–47 Luxembourg Esch 32–19 30–28
Csurgói Hungary 58–52 Spain Aragón 30–27 28–25
Kaustik Volgograd Russia 57–54 Romania Caraș Severin Reșița 31–26 26–28[F]
Beşiktaş Turkey 59–56 Switzerland Pfadi Winterthur 29–29 30–27
Sporta Hlohovec Slovakia 63–49 Bosnia and Herzegovina Borac Banja Luka 36–23 27–26[G]
Ronal Jičín Czech Republic 42–67 Denmark Skjern 21–38 21–29
Medvedi Perm Russia 51–59 Belarus Meshkov Brest 26–30 25–29
Nexe Našice Croatia 54–53 Greece Diomidis Argous 26–22 28–31
LUGI HF Sweden 51–47 Hungary Tatabánya 27–27 24–20
SMD Bacău Romania 65–49 Lithuania Klaipėda Dragunas 36–21 29–28
SKIF Krasnodar Russia 47–58 Croatia Poreč 25–29 22–29
Benfica Portugal 68–41 Iceland Haukar 34–19 34-22
Chambéry France 66–46 Turkey Ankaraspor 34–26 32–20[H]
Kadetten Schaffhausen Switzerland 66–54 Ukraine Portovik 33–28 33–26[I]
Mors-Thy Denmark 54–45 Norway Fyllingen Håndball 26–18 28–27
SKA Minsk Belarus 53–55 Norway ØIF Arendal 27–30[J] 26–25
Sporting Portugal 65–50 Netherlands KRAS/Volendam 30–18 35–32
Maccabi Tel Aviv Israel 49–56 Republic of Macedonia Strumica 26–26 23–30
Partizan Serbia 39–50 France Nantes 15–22 24–28
Bregenz Austria 49–62 Slovenia Maribor Branik 26–25 23–37
Notes
  1. ^ The second leg match between Kaustik Volgograd and Caraș Severin Reșița was played in Volgograd, Russia, with Caraș Severin Reșița being the official hosts.[10]
  2. ^ The second leg match between Sporta Hlohovec and Borac was played in Hlohovec, Slovakia, with Borac being the official hosts.[11]
  3. ^ The second leg match between Chambéry Savoie and Ankaraspor was played in Chambéry, France, with Ankaraspor being the official hosts.[12]
  4. ^ The second leg match between Kadetten Schaffhausen and Portovik was played in Schaffhausen, Switzerland, with Portovik being the official hosts.[13]
  5. ^ The first leg match between SKA Minsk and ØIF Arendal was played in Arendal, Norway, with SKA Minsk being the official hosts.[14]

Round 3[edit]

Before the draw, which took place on 22 October 2013 at the EHF headquarters in Vienna, 32 teams from 20 countries were divided into two pots without the country protection rule, meaning that two teams from the same country could face each other.[15] The first legs were played on 23–24 November and the second legs one week later.[15]

Teams listed first played the first leg at home. Highlighted teams qualified into the group stage.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
ØIF Arendal Norway 47–52 Slovakia Sporta Hlohovec 20–26 27–26
Füchse Berlin Germany 43–40 Belarus Meshkov Brest 22–20 21–20
Chambéry France 56–55 Austria Alpla HC Hard 31-30 25–25
Mors-Thy Denmark 52–59 Romania HCM Constanţa 26–27 26–32
Poreč Croatia 49–54 Portugal Sporting 24–24 25–30
Aarhus Denmark 53–59 Republic of Macedonia Strumica 29–26 24–33
Skjern Denmark 55–42 Serbia Vojvodina 31–24 24–18
Nantes France 52–44 Norway Elverum 28–21 24–23
Benfica Portugal 49–56 Hungary Pick Szeged 24–25 25–31
Beşiktaş Turkey 54–65 Hungary Csurgói 29–31 25–34
IFK Kristianstad Sweden 63–52 Romania SMD Bacău 40–25 23–27
Nexe Našice Croatia 62–62 (a) Spain Ademar León 34–29 28–33
Kadetten Schaffhausen Switzerland 55–69 Germany TSV Hannover-Burgdorf 28–28 27–41
Tatran Prešov Slovakia 62–56 Slovenia Maribor Branik 34–26 28–30
Kaustik Volgograd Russia 55–73 France Montpellier 26–38 29–35
AEK Athens Greece 45–49 Sweden LUGI HF 22–24 23–25

Group stage[edit]

Location of teams of the 2013–14 EHF Cup group stage.
Red pog.svg Red: Group A; Blue pog.svg Blue: Group B; Green pog.svg Green: Group C; Yellow pog.svg Yellow: Group D.

Draw and format[edit]

The draw of the EHF Cup group phase was carried out on 5 December 2013 in Vienna, Austria. The teams were positioned into four pots, with the country protection rule applied: two clubs from the same country may not face each other in the same group.[16]

The group stage features 16 teams, which were allocated four groups of four. In each group, teams play against each other home-and-away in a round-robin format. The matchdays are 8–9 February, 15–16 February, 22–23 February, 15–16 March, 22–23 March, and 29–30 March 2014. The top two teams from each group qualified for the quarter-finals, which were scheduled in April 2013.[17]

If Füchse Berlin, as the organiser of the Final 4 tournament, win their group or finish among top three second-ranked teams, they will receive a direct qualification to the Final 4 tournament. If the German side wins their group then the other three group winners and the three best second ranked team will qualify for the quarter-finals. If the Germans finish among the top three second-ranked teams, the quarter-finals will consist of four group winners and two best second-ranked teams. If Füchse Berlin finish as the worst second-ranked team, they will have to play the quarter-final match. Should the German club rank on the third or fourth position in their group, they will be out of the competition, but they will still organize the Final 4 tournament.

If two or more teams are equal on points on completion of the group matches, the following criteria are applied to determine the rankings (in descending order):[18]

  1. number of points in matches of all teams directly involved;
  2. goal difference in matches of all teams directly involved;
  3. greater number of plus goals in matches of all teams directly involved;
  4. goal difference in all matches of the group;
  5. greater number of plus goals in all matches of the group;

If no ranking can be determined, a decision shall be obtained by drawing lots. Lots shall be drawn by the EHF, if possible in the presence of a responsible of each club.

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4
Hungary Pick Szeged Slovakia Tatran Prešov Sweden LUGI HF Sweden IFK Kristianstad
France Montpellier Denmark Skjern France Chambéry Hungary Csurgó
Germany Füchse Berlin Romania Constanţa France Nantes Slovakia Sporta Hlohovec
Germany Hannover Spain Ademar León Republic of Macedonia Strumica Portugal Sporting
Key to colours in group tables
Teams that have qualified to the next phase of the competition

Group A[edit]

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
Sweden LUGI HF 6 3 1 2 171 169 +2 7
Spain Ademar León 6 2 2 2 173 164 +9 6
Hungary Csurgó 6 3 0 3 163 160 +3 6
Germany TSV Hannover-Burgdorf 6 2 1 3 168 182 −14 5
  HAN ADE LHF CSK
TSV Hannover-Burgdorf 27–26 28–32 27–26
Ademar León 30-30 32–27 28–19
LUGI HF 32–28 30-30 28-26
Csurgói 36–28 31–27 25-22

Group B[edit]

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
France Montpellier 6 6 0 0 192 147 +45 12
Portugal Sporting 6 4 0 2 195 165 +30 8
Denmark Skjern 6 2 0 4 156 158 −2 4
Republic of Macedonia Strumica 6 0 0 6 130 203 −73 0
  MON SKJ STR SPO
Montpellier 27–25 41–22 36–31
Skjern 23–26 31–20> 25–32
Strumica 19–32 23–24 24–36
Sporting 27–30 30–28 39–22

Group C[edit]

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
Hungary Pick Szeged 6 5 0 1 174 159 +15 10
France Nantes 6 4 0 2 176 154 +22 8
Slovakia Tatran Prešov 6 2 0 4 181 198 −17 4
Sweden IFK Kristianstad 6 1 0 5 151 171 −20 2
  SZE TAT NAN IFK
Pick Szeged 37–31 28–27 29–18
Tatran Prešov 29–31 30–29 37–30
Nantes 31–23 37–27 25–23
IFK Kristianstad 23–26 34–27 23–27

Group D[edit]

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
Germany Füchse Berlin[K] 6 4 2 0 181 164 +17 10
Romania Constanţa 6 3 2 1 173 160 +13 8
France Chambéry 6 2 2 2 162 158 +4 6
Slovakia Sporta Hlohovec 6 0 0 6 147 181 −34 0
  BER CON CHA HLO
Füchse Berlin 28–26 30–27 34–28
HCM Constanţa 31-31 29–25 31–22
Chambéry 25–25 29-29 27–21
Sporta Hlohovec 27–33 25–27 24–29
Notes
  1. ^ Füchse Berlin finished the group stage among the group winners and has qualified directly to the final four tournament.

Ranking of the second-placed teams[edit]

The ranking of the second-placed teams is carried out on the basis of the team's results in the group stage. Because the German side Füchse Berlin, the organizers of the Final 4 tournament, finished on top of their group they qualified directly to the final tournament and only the top three second-placed teams qualified to the quarter-finals.

Group Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
B Portugal Sporting 6 4 0 2 195 165 +30 8
C France Nantes 6 4 0 2 176 154 +22 8
D Romania Constanţa 6 3 2 1 173 160 +13 8
A Spain Ademar León 6 2 2 2 173 164 +9 6

Knockout stage[edit]

Quarter-finals[edit]

Draw and format[edit]

Because the hosts of the Final 4 tournament, Füchse Berlin, finished the group stage among the group winners, they have clinched the direct ticket to the final weekend and decided that only three quarter-finals will be played for the remaining spots in the final tournament.[2] The draw of the EHF Cup quarter-finals was carried out on Tuesday 1 April 2014 at the EHF headquarters in Vienna, Austria.[2][19] Six teams were positioned into two pots with the country protection rule not applied: two clubs from the same country could face each other in the quarter-finals.[2] However, teams from the same group cannot face each other in the quarter-finals.[2] The first pot contained the three group winners and the second pot contained the top three second-placed teams.[2]

In the quarter-finals, teams played against each other on a home-and-away basis, with the teams from second pot playing the first leg at home.[19] The first leg matches were played over 19–21 April, and the second leg matches were played over 26–27 April.[2]

Pot 1
Sweden LUGI HF
France Montpellier
Hungary Pick Szeged
Pot 2
Portugal Sporting
France HBC Nantes
Romania Constanţa
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Constanţa Romania 59–55 Sweden LUGI HF 31–21 28–34
Sporting Portugal 51–56 Hungary Pick Szeged 29–27 22–28
HBC Nantes France 49–59 France Montpellier 25–26 24–33

Final four[edit]

The tournament was played at the 8,700 capacity Max-Schmeling-Halle in the German capital Berlin, the home of Füchse Berlin.[3]

Semi-finals Final
17 May
 Romania Constanţa  32  
 France Montpellier  36  
 
18 May
     France Montpellier  28
   Hungary Pick Szeged  29
Third place
17 May 18 May
 Germany Füchse Berlin  22  Romania Constanţa  28
 Hungary Pick Szeged  24    Germany Füchse Berlin  29

Top goalscorers[edit]

Rank Name Team Goals
1 Slovenia Dragan Gajić France Montpellier 72
2 Romania Alexandru Șimicu Romania Constanţa 66
3 Portugal Pedro Andre Caseiro Portela Portugal Sporting 60
4 Hungary Zsolt Balogh Hungary Pick Szeged 57
5 Romania Alexandru Csepreghi Romania Constanţa 52
6 Sweden Jonas Erik Larholm Hungary Pick Szeged 49
7 Portugal Pedro Alberto Silva Osorio Solha Portugal Sporting 48
Romania Laurențiu Toma Romania Constanţa 48
9 Slovenia Jure Dolenec France Montpellier 45
10 Spain Jorge Maqueda-Peño France Nantes 43

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d e "Seven organisers bid for the EHF Cup Finals". European Handball Federation official website. 13 September 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Pots for the EHF Cup Quarter-final draw confirmed". EHF official website. 30 March 2014. Retrieved 2 April 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Official contract for EHF Cup Finals signed". European Handball Federation official website. 5 December 2013. Retrieved 8 December 2013. 
  4. ^ "2013/14 list of participants". europeancup.eurohandball.com. Retrieved 7 December 2013. 
  5. ^ "Maccabi Rishon Lezion vs Meshkov Brest". European Handball Federation official website. 8 September 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013. 
  6. ^ "OCI-Lions vs Haukar". European Handball Federation official website. 13 September 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013. 
  7. ^ "Dobrudja vs Ronal Jicin". European Handball Federation official website. 8 September 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013. 
  8. ^ "London GD vs Ankaraspor". European Handball Federation official website. 14 September 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013. 
  9. ^ "Lovcen vs Maccabi Tel Aviv". European Handball Federation official website. 17 September 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013. 
  10. ^ "Caras Severin vs Kaustik". European Handball Federation official website. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  11. ^ "Sporta Hlohovec vs Borac". European Handball Federation official website. Retrieved 14 October 2013. 
  12. ^ "Ankaraspor vs Chambery". European Handball Federation official website. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  13. ^ "Portovik vs Kadetten Schaffhausen". European Handball Federation official website. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  14. ^ "SKA Minsk vs OIF Arendal". European Handball Federation official website. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  15. ^ a b "Seeding for the EHF Cup Qualification Round 3 draw". European Handball Federation official website. 21 October 2013. Retrieved 22 October 2013. 
  16. ^ "Statements from the EHF Cup Group Phase draw". European Handball Federation official website. 5 December 2013. 
  17. ^ "Foxes go hunting in Romania, France and Slovakia after group phase draw". European Handball Federation official website. 5 December 2013. 
  18. ^ "Regulations". European Handball Federation official website. p. 21. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  19. ^ a b "Montpellier face Nantes in all-French quarter-final". EHF official website. 1 April 2014. Retrieved 2 April 2014.