2013–14 ISU Speed Skating World Cup

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ISU Speed Skating World Cup
Essent ISU World Cup Speed Skating logo.svg
Dates 8 November 2013 – 16 March 2014
«2012–13 2014–15»
ISU Speed Skating World Cup
2013–14
Men

500 m | 1000 m | 1500 m | 5k/10k | Mass start | Team pursuit

Women

500 m | 1000 m | 1500 m | 3k/5k | Mass start | Team pursuit

World Cup weekends

Calgary | Salt Lake City | Astana
Berlin | Inzell | Heerenveen

The 2013–14 ISU Speed Skating World Cup, officially the Essent ISU World Cup Speed Skating 2013–2014, is a series of international speed skating competitions planned to run the entire season. The season will start on 8 November 2013 in Calgary, Canada, and will end with the final on 16 March 2014 in Heerenveen, Netherlands. Compared to previous seasons, fewer competition weekends are planned; the season is restricted due to the 2014 Winter Olympics, which will be arranged in Sochi, Russia, during February 2014.[1][2] In total, six competition weekends will be held at six different locations, twelve cups will be contested (six for men, and six for women), and 72 races will take place.

The World Cup is organized by the International Skating Union (ISU).

Calendar[edit]

The detailed schedule for the season.[1] Additionally, the team sprint will be a demonstration event in Inzell.[1]

WC # City Venue Date 500 m 1000 m 1500 m 3000 m 5000 m 10000 m Mass start Team pursuit
1 Canada Calgary Olympic Oval 8–10 November 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m m, w
2 United States Salt Lake City Utah Olympic Oval 15–17 November 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m m, w
3 Kazakhstan Astana Alau Ice Palace 29 November – 1 December 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m
4 Germany Berlin Sportforum Hohenschönhausen 6–8 December 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m m, w
Norway Hamar Vikingskipet 11–12 January 2014 European Allround Speed Skating Championships
Japan Nagano M-Wave 18–19 January 2014 World Sprint Speed Skating Championships
Russia Sochi Adler Arena 8–22 February Speed skating at the 2014 Winter Olympics
5 Germany Inzell Eisstadion Inzell 7–9 March 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m m, w
6 Netherlands Heerenveen Thialf 14–16 March 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m m, w m, w
Netherlands Heerenveen Thialf 21–23 March 2014 World Allround Speed Skating Championships
Total 12m, 12w 6m, 6w 6m, 6w 5w 5m, 1w 1m 2m, 2w 4m, 4w
Note: the men's 5000 and 10000 metres will be contested as one cup, and the women's 3000 and 5000 metres will be contested as one cup, as indicated by the color coding.[1]

Entry rules[edit]

Qualification criteria[edit]

In order to qualify, skaters must have achieved the following results in ISU events, international competitions or national championships between 1 July 2012 and the entry deadline for the competition concerned.[1]

A in the Olympic Oval, Calgary, or the Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City
B in other ice rinks
C or 6:35.00 on 5000 m
D or 6:40.00 on 5000 m
E or 4:15.00 on 3000 m
F or 4:20.00 on 3000 m

For the mass start and team pursuit events, skaters who have achieved any one of the above results will qualify.[1]

Nation quotas[edit]

Every ISU member nation may enter at least one competitor for each distance, subject to the qualification criteria above. Additionally, skaters placed among the top 36 in the final 2012–13 World Cup, or included in the final qualifying list (including the reserve list) of the 2013 World Single Distance Championships, for the distance category concerned, may be entered.[1] Member nations not mentioned may enter maximum one skater for each distance.

For the mass start event, a member nation may enter maximum three skaters, all subject to the qualifying criteria above. For the team pursuit event, a member nation may enter one team only per category (men/women).[1]

Competition format[edit]

Seeding of skaters[edit]

If the number of entered skaters exceeds a certain limit, skaters compete in two separate divisions, A and B.[1] In the first competition, the composition of skaters in the respective division is determined by the ranking of the skaters in the respective distance category from the 2012–13 World Cup and the seeding submitted by the respective team leaders before the draw. For each country and distance category, the number of skaters in the ranking top of the previous year will decide the number of places available in Division A, but the team leader's seeding will decide which skater goes into which division.

In the following competitions, the current World Cup ranking is used, with special considerations to top-placed skaters in Division B of the previous competition. A skater may also under certain conditions apply for a wild card for Division A, but only the first time the skater participates in a distance category, and not in the first and last competitions of the season.[1] In the last competition for the season, there will be no Division B.

Number of competitors in Division A
World Cup 1–5
number of entries
World Cup 6
Distance up to 20 21 to 24 25 to 28 29 or more
500 m
1000 m
1500 m
all all all 20 20
5000 m men
3000 m women
all 12 16 16 16
10000 m men
5000 m women
12 12 12 12
Mass start all all 16 20 20

Points system[edit]

Points tables[edit]

World Cup points for all competitions, except the last, are awarded in both divisions, using two sets of tables, A1/B1 and A2/B2. Tables A1 and B1 are used when the number of competitors in Division A exceeds 16, while tables A2 and B2 are used when that number is between 12 and 16. However, if table B1 was used for Division B in the first race in an event that is raced twice in the same competition, it will be used also in the second race, regardless of the number of competitors in Division A.[1]

For the last competition, since there will be no Division B, points will be awarded using table A3.[1]

Mass start ranking[edit]

The mass start races will be over 20 laps for men and 15 laps for women. There will be three intermediate sprints, at 5, 10 and 15 laps for men, and at 4, 8 and 12 laps for women. Race points will be awarded to the four first skaters at the intermediate sprints, and to the six first skaters at the final sprint.[1] The accumulated points a skater collects during a race will decide the final ranking. For skaters who are tied in race points, including those who have failed to collect any, their finishing order will be break the tie.

Points table for mass start
Rank Intermediate sprints Final sprint (finish)
1 5 31
2 3 15
3 2 10
4 1 5
5 3
6 1

Grand World Cup[edit]

In order to determine an overall World Cup winner, one for men and one for women, a special points system is used, awarding points for the top five skaters in each individual event.[1]

Points table for Grand World Cup
Rank World Cup 1–5 World Cup 6
1 10 15
2 8 12
3 7 10,5
4 6 9
5 5 7,5
Note: half points are awarded in distances that are skated twice in the same competition.

Prize money[edit]

Additionally, the Grand World Cup winner of each category (men/women) is awarded $20000.[1]

World records[edit]

World records going into the 2013–14 season.

Men[edit]

Distance Time Holder(s) Nat. Date Venue Reference
500 m 34.03 Jeremy Wotherspoon Canada 9 November 2007 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [3]
1000 m 1:06.42 Shani Davis United States 7 March 2009 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [4]
1500 m 1:41.04 Shani Davis United States 11 December 2009 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [5]
5000 m 6:03.32 Sven Kramer Netherlands 17 November 2007 Olympic Oval, Calgary [6]
10000 m 12:41.69 Sven Kramer Netherlands 10 March 2007 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [7]
Team pursuit
(8 laps)
3:37.80 Sven Kramer
Carl Verheijen
Erben Wennemars
Netherlands 11 March 2007 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [8]

On 9 November 2013, in the team pursuit race in Calgary, the Dutch team, comprised by Koen Verweij, Jan Blokhuijsen and Sven Kramer, broke the world record with a time of 3:37.17.[9] The next weekend, on 16 November, the same skaters improved the record further, to 3:35.60.[10]

Women[edit]

Distance Time Holder(s) Nat. Date Venue Reference
500 m 36.80 Lee Sang-hwa South Korea 20 January 2013 Olympic Oval, Calgary [11]
1000 m 1:12.68 Christine Nesbitt Canada 28 January 2012 Olympic Oval, Calgary [12]
1500 m 1:51.79 Cindy Klassen Canada 20 November 2005 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [13]
3000 m 3:53.34 Cindy Klassen Canada 18 March 2006 Olympic Oval, Calgary [14]
5000 m 6:42.66 Martina Sáblíková Czech Republic 18 February 2011 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [15]
Team pursuit
(6 laps)
2:55.79 Kristina Groves
Christine Nesbitt
Brittany Schussler
Canada 6 December 2009 Olympic Oval, Calgary [16]

On 9 November 2013, in the second 500 metres race in Calgary, Lee Sang-hwa of South Korea improved her own world record with a time of 36.74 seconds.[9] The next weekend, in Salt Lake City, Lee broke the record twice. First, on Friday, she lowered the record to 36.57 seconds.[17] On Saturday, she improved it another 21/100, to 36.36 seconds.[10] On Sunday, 17 November, also in Salt Lake City, Brittany Bowe broke the world record on 1000 metres with a time of 1:12.58.[18]

Men's standings[edit]

500 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Netherlands Ronald Mulder 782
2 Netherlands Michel Mulder 728
3 Netherlands Jan Smeekens 655

1000 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 United States Shani Davis 590
2 Canada Denny Morrison 344
3 Netherlands Kjeld Nuis 305

1500 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Netherlands Koen Verweij 440
2 Russia Denis Yuskov 430
3 United States Shani Davis 401

5000 and 10000 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Netherlands Jorrit Bergsma 500
2 Germany Patrick Beckert 311
3 Netherlands Sven Kramer 300

Mass start[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Netherlands Bob de Vries 220
2 Netherlands Arjan Stroetinga 175
3 Belgium Bart Swings 170

Team pursuit[edit]

Rank Country Points
1  Netherlands 450
2  United States 280
3  Norway 270

Grand World Cup[edit]

Rank Name Points
1
2
3

Women's standings[edit]

500 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Russia Olga Fatkulina 960
2 United States Heather Richardson 915
3 Germany Jenny Wolf 803

1000 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 United States Heather Richardson 555
2 United States Brittany Bowe 500
3 Russia Olga Fatkulina 352

1500 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Netherlands Ireen Wüst 530
2 Netherlands Lotte van Beek 430
3 United States Brittany Bowe 389

3000 and 5000 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Czech Republic Martina Sáblíková 550
2 Germany Claudia Pechstein 416
3 Netherlands Yvonne Nauta 326

Mass start[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Italy Francesca Lollobrigida 200
2 Netherlands Irene Schouten 190
3 Netherlands Janneke Ensing 155

Team pursuit[edit]

Rank Country Points
1  Netherlands 450
2  Poland 315
3  Japan 285

Grand World Cup[edit]

Rank Name Points
1
2
3

Medal table[edit]

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1
Total

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Essent ISU World Cup Speed Skating 2013/14" (PDF). International Skating Union. 2 October 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2013. 
  2. ^ "About the World Cups Long Track". speedskating.ca. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  3. ^ "Evolution of the world record 500 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  4. ^ "Evolution of the world record 1000 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  5. ^ "Evolution of the world record 1500 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  6. ^ "Evolution of the world record 5000 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  7. ^ "Evolution of the world record 10,000 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  8. ^ "Evolution of the world record Team pursuit Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "Sang-Hwa Lee (KOR) sets world record in 500m". International Skating Union. 9 November 2013. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Dutch set new Men's Team Pursuit world record". International Skating Union. 16 November 2013. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Evolution of the world record 500 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  12. ^ "Evolution of the world record 1000 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  13. ^ "Evolution of the world record 1500 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  14. ^ "Evolution of the world record 3000 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  15. ^ "Evolution of the world record 5000 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  16. ^ "Evolution of the world record Team pursuit Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  17. ^ "Antoinette de Jong (NED) sets sub-four-minute Junior 3000m record". International Skating Union. 15 November 2013. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  18. ^ "Brittany Bowe (USA) sets 1000m world record". International Skating Union. 17 November 2013. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 

External links[edit]