2013 FY27

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2013 FY27
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Scott Sheppard
Chad Trujillo
Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (807)
Discovery date 17 March 2013
announced: 31 March 2014
Designations
MPC designation 2013 FY27
Minor planet category TNO, SDO[2]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 2013-Jul-24
(Uncertainty=8)[3]
Aphelion 82.6 ± 4 AU (Q)
Perihelion 35.7 ± 1.3 AU (q)
59.1 ± 2.9 AU (a)
Eccentricity 0.396 ± 0.05
455 ± 33 yr
214 ± 55° (M)
Inclination 33.13 ± 0.02°
187.04 ± 0.02°
137 ± 26°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 530[a]–1100[b] km[3][4]
900 km[5]
761 km (Brown)[6]
Albedo 0.1 to 0.4? (assumed range)
0.15 (theoretically expected value)[6]
22.1
3.0 (JPL)[3]
3.3 (Brown)[6]

2013 FY27, also written 2013 FY27, is a trans-Neptunian object[3] that belongs to the scattered disc (like Eris).[5] Its discovery was announced on 31 March 2014.[1] It has an absolute magnitude (H) of 3.0,[3] which makes it very likely to be a dwarf planet.[6] Assuming an albedo of 0.15, it would be approximately 850 kilometres (530 mi) in diameter.[4] It is the ninth-intrinsically-brightest known trans-Neptunian object.[7]

2013 FY27 will come to perihelion around 2198,[c] at a distance of about 36 AU.[3] It is currently near aphelion, 80 AU from the Sun, and, as a result, it has an apparent magnitude of 22.[1] Its orbit has a significant inclination of 33°.[3]

First observed on 17 March 2013, it has an observation arc of about one year.[3] It came to opposition in early March 2014.

2012 VP113 was announced before 2013 FY27, which was in turn announced before 2013 FZ27.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Assuming an albedo of 0.4
  2. ^ Assuming an albedo of 0.1
  3. ^ The uncertainty in the year of perihelion passage is ≈56 years.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "MPEC 2014-F82 : 2013 FY27". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2014-03-31. Retrieved 2014-03-31.  (K13F27Y)
  2. ^ "List Of Centaurs and Scattered-Disk Objects". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2014-04-02. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2013 FY27)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 2014-03-26 last obs (arc=~1 year). Retrieved 2014-03-31. 
  4. ^ a b Dan Bruton. "Conversion of Absolute Magnitude to Diameter for Minor Planets". Department of Physics & Astronomy (Stephen F. Austin State University). Retrieved 2014-03-26. 
  5. ^ a b Lakdawalla, Emily (2014-04-02). "More excitement in the outermost solar system: 2013 FY27, a new dwarf planet". Planetary Society blogs. The Planetary Society. Retrieved 2014-04-02. 
  6. ^ a b c d Mike Brown, How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (assumes H = 3.3)
  7. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: orbital class (TNO) and H < 3.1 (mag)". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 2014-03-31. 

External links[edit]