2013 FZ27

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2013 FZ27
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Scott Sheppard
Chad Trujillo
Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (807)
Discovery date 16 March 2013
announced: 2 April 2014
Designations
MPC designation 2013 FZ27
Minor planet category Other resonant TNO?[2]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 2014-May-23
(Uncertainty=5)[3]
Aphelion 58.7 ± 0.1 AU (Q)
Perihelion 37.9 ± 0.08 AU (q)
48.3 ± 0.08 AU (a)
Eccentricity 0.214 ± 0.003
336 ± 1 yr
278 ± 0.7° (M)
Inclination 14.012 ± 0.001°
284.92 ± 0.006°
341 ± 0.32°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 330[a]–740[b] km[3][4]
600 km[5]
Albedo 0.08 to 0.4? (assumed range)
21.1 (2014-Feb-22)[2]
4.0 (JPL/MPC)[3][2]
4.3 (Brown)[5]

2013 FZ27, also written 2013 FZ27, is a trans-Neptunian object that, as of 2014, is located near the edge of the Kuiper belt.[3] Its discovery was announced on 2 April 2014.[1] It has an absolute magnitude (H) of 4.0,[3] which makes it likely to be a dwarf planet. Assuming an albedo of 0.15, it would be approximately 500 kilometres (310 mi) in diameter.[4]

2013 FZ27 will come to perihelion around 2091,[c] at a distance of about 38 AU.[3] As of 2014, it is 49 AU from the Sun and has an apparent magnitude of 21.1.[1]

First detected on 16 March 2013, it had an observation arc of about one year when announced. It came to opposition in late February 2014. Four precovery images, by Pan-STARRS from 21 February 2013, were quickly located.[2] Eight more precovery images, by Pan-STARRS from January and February of 2011, have been located, extending the observation arc to 1151 days.[2]

The Sedna-like 2012 VP113 and the scattered-disc object 2013 FY27 were discovered by the same survey as 2013 FZ27 and were announced a few days before.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Assuming an albedo of 0.4
  2. ^ Assuming an albedo of 0.08
  3. ^ The 1-sigma uncertainty in the year of perihelion passage is less than 1 year.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "MPEC 2014-G07 : 2013 FZ27". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2014-04-02. Retrieved 2014-04-02.  (K13F27Z)
  2. ^ a b c d e "2013 FZ27 Orbit" (arc=1151 days over 3 oppositions). IAU Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2014-04-17. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2013 FZ27)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 2014-03-26 last obs (arc=3.51 years). Retrieved 2014-04-17. 
  4. ^ a b Dan Bruton. "Conversion of Absolute Magnitude to Diameter for Minor Planets". Department of Physics & Astronomy (Stephen F. Austin State University). Retrieved 2014-04-06. 
  5. ^ a b Brown, Michael E.. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2014-04-18. 

External links[edit]