2013 Monte Carlo Rally

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
2013 Monte Carlo Rally
81ème Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo
Round 1 of 13 of the 2013 World Rally Championship
Next event →
Host country  Monaco
Rally base France Valence, Rhône-Alpes
Dates run 15 – 20 January 2013
Stages 18 (478.42 km; 297.28 mi)
Stage surface Tarmac and snow[1]
Overall distance 1,820.72 km (1,131.34 mi)
Results
Overall winner France Sébastien Loeb
Monaco Daniel Elena
France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT
Crews 73 at start, 45 at finish

The 2013 Monte Carlo Rally (formally known as the 81ème Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo) was a motor racing event for rally cars that was held over four days between 16 and 19 January,[2] and marked the eighty-first running of the Monte Carlo Rally. After the ceremonial start in Monte Carlo, the rally was based in the French town of Valence. The rally itself was contested over eighteen special stages in the French provinces of Rhône-Alpes and Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, covering a total of 468.42 km (291.06 mi) in competitive stages.[3]

The rally was the first round of the 2013 World Rally Championship season, and marked the fortieth anniversary of the World Rally Championship; the 1973 event was the opening round of the championship in its inaugural season.[4] Thirteen World Rally Car crews were entered in the event,[5] including the defending World Drivers' Champion Sébastien Loeb, prior to the start a six-time winner of the Monte Carlo Rally.[6]

The event was run in difficult conditions, with teams reporting during preparations for the event that the stages were subject to the heaviest snowfalls since the 2000 season.[7] The rally was won by Sébastien Loeb, the seventy-seventh of his career and his seventh victory on the Rallye Monte Carlo. The Volkswagen Polo R WRC scored a podium on its competitive debut in the hands of Sébastien Ogier, with Dani Sordo completing the podium in a Citroën DS3 WRC.

Entry list[edit]

Entries for the rally closed on 14 December 2012, and were published one week later. Eighty-four entries were received,[5][8] with seventy-three teams starting the event.[9] Thirteen World Rally Cars started the event, as did eight entries in the newly formed WRC-2 championship for cars built to Group N and Super 2000 regulations, and three teams eligible to score points in the WRC-3 championship for two-wheel drive cars.[9]

Notable entrants
No. Entrant Class Driver Co-driver Car Tyre
1 France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT WRC France Loeb, SébastienSébastien Loeb Monaco Elena, DanielDaniel Elena Citroën DS3 WRC M
2 France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT WRC Finland Hirvonen, MikkoMikko Hirvonen Finland Lehtinen, JarmoJarmo Lehtinen Citroën DS3 WRC M
4 United Kingdom Qatar M-Sport WRT WRC Norway Østberg, MadsMads Østberg Sweden Andersson, JonasJonas Andersson Ford Fiesta RS WRC M
5 United Kingdom Qatar M-Sport WRT WRC Russia Novikov, EvgenyEvgeny Novikov Austria Minor, IlkaIlka Minor Ford Fiesta RS WRC M
6 United Kingdom Qatar World Rally Team WRC Finland Hänninen, JuhoJuho Hänninen Finland Tuominen, TomiTomi Tuominen Ford Fiesta RS WRC M
7 Germany Volkswagen Motorsport WRC Finland Latvala, Jari-MattiJari-Matti Latvala Finland Anttila, MiikkaMiikka Anttila Volkswagen Polo R WRC M
8 Germany Volkswagen Motorsport WRC France Ogier, SébastienSébastien Ogier France Ingrassia, JulienJulien Ingrassia Volkswagen Polo R WRC M
10 France Abu Dhabi Citroën Total WRT WRC Spain Sordo, DaniDani Sordo Spain del Barrio, CarlosCarlos del Barrio Citroën DS3 WRC M
11 United Kingdom Qatar World Rally Team WRC Belgium Neuville, ThierryThierry Neuville Belgium Gilsoul, NicolasNicolas Gilsoul Ford Fiesta RS WRC M
12 Italy Lotos Team WRC WRC Poland Kościuszko, MichałMichał Kościuszko Poland Szczepaniak, MaciejMaciej Szczepaniak Mini John Cooper Works WRC D
21 Czech Republic Jipocar Czech National Team WRC Czech Republic Prokop, MartinMartin Prokop Czech Republic Ernst, MichalMichal Ernst Ford Fiesta RS WRC D
22 France Bryan Bouffier WRC France Bouffier, BryanBryan Bouffier France Panseri, XavierXavier Panseri Citroën DS3 WRC M
24 France Julien Maurin WRC France Maurin, JulienJulien Maurin France Klinger, NicolasNicolas Klinger Ford Fiesta RS WRC M
31 Czech Republic Škoda Motorsport WRC-2 Finland Lappi, EsapekkaEsapekka Lappi Finland Ferm, JanneJanne Ferm Škoda Fabia S2000 M
32 Germany Škoda Auto Deutschland WRC-2 Germany Wiegand, SeppSepp Wiegand Germany Christian, FrankFrank Christian Škoda Fabia S2000 M
33 Austria Stohl Racing WRC-2 Germany Kremer, ArminArmin Kremer Germany Wicha, KlausKlaus Wicha Subaru Impreza M
34 Belgium Symtech Racing WRC-2 Italy Betti, LucaLuca Betti Italy Pezzoli, FrancescoFrancesco Pezzoli Peugeot 207 S2000 M
36 United Arab Emirates Skydive Dubai Rally Team WRC-2 United Arab Emirates al Ketbi, RashidRashid al Ketbi Germany Hepperle, KarinaKarina Hepperle Škoda Fabia S2000 D
37 Italy Lorenzo Bertelli WRC-2 Italy Bertelli, LorenzoLorenzo Bertelli Italy Granai, LorenzoLorenzo Granai Subaru Impreza M
38 Mexico Moto Club Igualda WRC-2 Mexico Triviño, RicardoRicardo Triviño Spain Haro, ÀlexÀlex Haro Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution X M
39 Belgium Symtech Racing WRC-2 Ukraine Protasov, YuriyYuriy Protasov Estonia Sikk, KuldarKuldar Sikk[10] Subaru Impreza R4 M
51 France Sébastien Chardonnet WRC-3 France Chardonnet, SébastienSébastien Chardonnet France de la Haye, ThibaultThibault de la Haye Citroën DS3 R3T M
52 France Quentin Gilbert WRC-3 France Gilbert, QuentinQuentin Gilbert France Galmiche, IsabelleIsabelle Galmiche Citroën DS3 R3T M
53 France Saintéloc Racing WRC-3 France Poutot, RenaudRenaud Poutot France Viragh, LudovicLudovic Viragh Citroën DS3 R3T M
Icon Class
WRC WRC entries eligible to
score manufacturer points
WRC Major entry ineligible to
score manufacturer points
WRC-2 Registered to take part in
WRC-2 championship
WRC-3 Registered to take part in
WRC-3 championship

Itinerary[edit]

The itinerary for the 2013 rally remained relatively unchanged from previous years.[3] The first day of the rally was made up of four special stages to the south and west of the rally base in Valence. Le Moulinon—Antraigues was the first and longest stage—at 37.10 km (23.05 mi)—of the rally, and was made up of narrow and twisty roads that climb the Col de la Fayolle, before the road widens for a fast descent.[11] This was followed by Burzet—St. Martial, consisting of a series of long technical sections through a forest that opens up onto narrow roads that are exposed to the prevailing weather conditions.[12] Both stages were contested for a second time later that afternoon. Both Le Moulinon—Antraigues and Burzet—St. Martial were modified from the 2012 route, having been extended slightly. This first leg of the rally was also the longest, covering some 135.40 km (84.13 mi) of competitive stages.

The second leg of the rally was made up of three stages to the north and west of Valence: Labatie d'Andaure—Lalouvesc, St. Bonnet—St. Julien Molhesabate—St. Bonnet and Lamastre—Gilhoc—Alboussière. Labatie d'Andaure—Lalouvesc was characterised by a long climb up the mountainside that became increasingly technical as it went on.[13] St. Bonnet—St. Julien Molhesabate—St. Bonnet both started and finished in the commune of St. Bonnet, encircling a valley with fast, open roads at high altitude.[14] Finally, Lamastre—Gilhoc—Alboussière was a fast and narrow descent that levelled out halfway through as it wound through open farmland.[15] As with the first day of the rally, these three stages were contested twice; once in the morning and again in the afternoon. Similarly, the stages had all minor adjustments from the 2012 route.

The third day of the rally was the shortest at 92.00 km (57.17 mi). This leg of the rally also featured the most changes to the route. The Cimetiere de Vassieux—Col de Gaudissart and Montauban-sur-l'Ouvèze—Eygalayes stages that have been used in recent years were not contested in 2012; instead, the cars travelled east and south of Valence for the St. Jean-en-Royans—La Cime Du Mas stage, which follows a difficult route across the contours of three mountain peaks. Although a regular feature of the rally route, the 2012 route used a version of St. Jean-en-Royans—La Cime Du Mas that had not been featured since 1997.[16] The cars returned to Valence for repairs at midday before contesting St. Nazaire le Desert—La Motte Chalancon and Sisteron—Thoard in the afternoon, both of which returned to the event after an extended absence. St. Nazaire le Desert—La Motte Chalancon was last used in 2009 as a round of the Intercontinental Rally Challenge when it was run in the opposite direction to the planned route for 2012, which follows narrow, twisty roads across a mountain ridge, passing through several small villages as it reaches a mountain pass over a kilometre above sea level.[17] Sisteron—Thoard had not featured in the route since 2002,[3] featuring 36.70 km (22.80 mi) of difficult mountain climbs, undulating technical sequences and fast, open stretches at higher altitudes.[18]

The fourth and final leg of the rally was made up of five stages. This formed the longest overall day of competition, with the stages in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region, close to the Italian border. The first of these stages, Moulinet—La Bollene Vesubie (also known as the Col de Turini) was contested three times; twice in the afternoon, and once at night. The stage is famous for its endless series of hairpin bends, and steep inclines throughout the stage.[19] The second stage, Lantosque—Lucéram, was also run twice across relatively flat terrain before climbing over a mountain ridge and descending to the commune of Lucéram.[19] The second running of the stage formed the "Power Stage" of the rally. This concept, introduced in 2011, awards bonus World Championship points to the three fastest drivers through the stage.

In detail[edit]

Itinerary of special stages
Time
(UTC+1)
Stage
number
Stage name Surface Length
(in km)
Length
(in mi)
Shakedown — 15 January
8:00 P1 Plateau Lautagne 1 Tarmac 3.58 km[20] 2.22 mi
9:00 P2 Plateau Lautagne 2 Tarmac 3.58 km 2.22 mi
10:00 P3 Plateau Lautagne 2 Tarmac 3.58 km 2.22 mi
11:00 Private Plateau Lautagne 4 Tarmac 3.58 km 2.22 mi
18:00 N/A Ceremonial start — Champs de Mars, Valence N/A N/A N/A
Leg 1 — 16 January
Chequered flag.png 9:03 SS1 Le Moulinon—Antraigues 1 Tarmac 37.10 km 23.05 mi
Chequered flag.png 10:21 SS2 Burzet—St. Martial 1 Tarmac 30.60 km 19.01 mi
Icon tools.svg 12:46 N/A Service A — Valence N/A N/A N/A
Chequered flag.png 14:21 SS3 Le Moulinon—Antraigues 2 Tarmac 37.10 km 23.05 mi
Chequered flag.png 15:39 SS4 Burzet—St. Martial 2 Tarmac 30.60 km 19.01 mi
Icon tools.svg 17:59 N/A Flexi Service B — Valence N/A N/A N/A
Modern clock chris kemps 01.svg 18:37 N/A Parc fermé — Valence N/A N/A N/A
Leg 2 — 17 January
Icon tools.svg 7:55 N/A Service C — Valence N/A N/A N/A
Chequered flag.png 9:33 SS5 Labatie d'Andaure—Lalouvesc 1 Tarmac 19.08 km 11.86 mi
Chequered flag.png 10:14 SS6 St. Bonnet—St. Julien Molhesabate—St. Bonnet 1 Tarmac 25.45 km 15.81 mi
Chequered flag.png 11:37 SS7 Lamastre—Gilhoc—Alboussiere 1 Tarmac 21.72 km 13.50 mi
Icon tools.svg 12:57 N/A Service D — Valence N/A N/A N/A
Chequered flag.png 14:50 SS8 Labatie d'Andaure—Lalouvesc 2 Tarmac 19.08 km 11.86 mi
Chequered flag.png 15:31 SS9 St. Bonnet—St. Julien Molhesabate—St. Bonnet 2 Tarmac 25.45 km 15.81 mi
Chequered flag.png 16:54 SS10 Lamastre—Gilhoc—Alboussiere 2 Tarmac 21.72 km 13.50 mi
Icon tools.svg 18:19 N/A Flexi Service E — Valence N/A N/A N/A
Modern clock chris kemps 01.svg 19:00 N/A Parc fermé — Valence N/A N/A N/A
Source:[21]
Itinerary of special stages
Time
(UTC+1)
Stage
number
Stage name Surface Length
(in km)
Length
(in mi)
Leg 3 — 18 January
Icon tools.svg 7:50 N/A Service F — Valence N/A N/A N/A
Chequered flag.png 9:08 SS11 St. Jean-en-Royans—La Cime du Mas Tarmac 33.19 km 20.62 mi
Icon tools.svg 11:23 N/A Service G — Valence N/A N/A N/A
Chequered flag.png 13:31 SS12 St. Nazaire le Desert—La Motte Chalancon Tarmac 22.11 km 13.74 mi
Chequered flag.png 15:29 SS13 Sisteron—Thoard Tarmac 36.70 km 22.80 mi
Modern clock chris kemps 01.svg 19:32 N/A Parc fermé — Monaco N/A N/A N/A
Leg 4 — 19 January
Icon tools.svg 13:15 N/A Service H — Monaco N/A N/A N/A
Chequered flag.png 15:11 SS14 Moulinet—La Bollene Vesubie 1 Tarmac 23.45 km 14.57 mi
Chequered flag.png 15:54 SS15 Lantosque—Lucéram 1 Tarmac 18.95 km 11.77 mi
Chequered flag.png 17:12 SS16 Moulinet—La Bollene Vesubie 2 Tarmac 23.45 km 14.57 mi
Icon tools.svg 19:17 N/A Service I — Monaco N/A N/A N/A
Chequered flag.png 20:58 SS17 Moulinet—La Bollene Vesubie 3 Tarmac 23.45 km 14.57 mi
Chequered flag.png 21:41 SS18 Lantosque—Lucéram 2 Tarmac 18.95 km 11.77 mi
Icon tools.svg 22:56 N/A Service J — Monaco N/A N/A N/A
Modern clock chris kemps 01.svg 23:09 N/A Parc fermé — Monaco N/A N/A N/A
Post-event — 20 January
11:00 N/A Finish ceremony — Prince's Palace, Monaco N/A N/A N/A
Source:[21]
Key
Icon Meaning
Chequered flag.png Special stage
Icon tools.svg Service park
Modern clock chris kemps 01.svg Parc fermé
Bold Power stage

Report[edit]

Leg 1[edit]

The opening stages of the rally presented a challenge to the drivers. Where the first pass through Le Moulinon—Antraigues was mostly dry, the Burzet—St. Martial stage was covered in snow, making tyre choice critical. With the cars running in the order that they finished the 2012 season, Sébastien Loeb was the first driver through the stages, and on his arrival at the end of Le Moulinon—Antraigues it was observed that the dry conditions had torn the studs free of his front tyres. This would become a problem that all of the leading teams would be faced with. Nevertheless, Loeb set the early pace, finishing the stage seventeen seconds ahead of team-mate Mikko Hirvonen and looked unchallenged until Sébastien Ogier set a stage time that was three and a half second faster, giving the Volkswagen Polo R WRC a stage win on the very first stage it contested.[22] Meanwhile, Jari-Matti Latvala in the second Polo R, arrived late at a time control checkpoint before the second stage, and received a thirty-second penalty. Ogier and Loeb maintained their momentum through the snowy Burzet—St. Martial stage, but Loeb took the rally lead from Ogier by seven seconds. Dani Sordo, in the third works-supported Citroën DS3 WRC, retained third place despite a fast time from Juho Hänninen in the Qatar World Rally Team Fiesta RS that saw him pick up two places overall.

Following the service park in Valence, the cars returned to Le Moulinon—Antraigues, where Loeb continued to build on his lead, finishing the stage twelve seconds faster than Latvala, who after some initial teething problems had gained confidence in the Polo R. Sordo was once again third, whilst Hirvonen took fourth back from Hänninen. Ogier finished the stage fifth to be twenty-six and a half seconds behind Loeb. The second pass over Burzet—St. Martial was dry, as the cars had swept the stage of snow during the first run over the stage. The difference was so significant that Loeb set a stage time four minutes faster than the time he recorded in the morning. Hirvonen finished second, some thirty-four seconds slower, to capture third overall from Sordo. Mads Østberg finished the stage third ahead of Ogier, while Latvala finished fifth, recoving to fifth place overall after running as low as ninth during the morning stages. Burzet—St. Martial also claimed the first retirement among the World Rally Cars when Thierry Neuville broke the suspension on his Fiesta RS, coming to a halt less than a kilometre from the spot he retired in 2012.

The opening leg of the rally was also marked by technical troubles in the timing logs,[23] with errors in the system falsely recording Loeb as stopping on the first stage. The problem was rectified when Citroën shut off the Global Positioning System tracking devices installed in the cars driven by Loeb and Dani Sordo,[24] but it was some time before organisers were able to confirm the results at the end of the day. Loeb finished the final stage with a lead of one minute and twenty seconds over Ogier, with Hirvonen third, a further twenty-six seconds behind.[25]

Leg 2[edit]

Conditions during the second leg were more consistent than on the first, but considerably colder, with snow recorded on all three stages. Sébastien Ogier recovered five seconds from overnight leader Sébastien Loeb on the first pass through Labatie d'Andaure—Lalouvesc, but team-mate Jari-Matti Latvala struggled once again and lost fifth place to Evgeny Novikov, who went on to set the fastest time through St. Bonnet—St. Julien Molhesabate—St. Bonnet, ahead of Mads Østberg and Juho Hänninen to give Ford the three fastest times of the stage. Novikov took his second stage win on Lamastre—Gilhoc—Alboussiere, while Loeb and Ogier duelled back and forth throughout the morning, taking several seconds away from each other across the three stages. Meanwhile, a difficult day saw Lotos Team WRC's Michał Kościuszko end the first leg in twenty-first position overall, and he spent most of the morning stages recovering, running as high as sixteenth before crashing his Mini John Cooper Works WRC on St. Bonnet—St. Julien Molhesabate—St. Bonnet. Despite extensive damage to the rear of his car, he was able to continue to the midday service.

During the afternoon stages, Loeb won the second pass over Labatie d'Andaure—Lalouvesc and there was no movement among the leading competitors in the overall standings. Juho Hänninen took his maiden stage win on the second running of St. Bonnet—St. Julien Molhesabate—St. Bonnet, six seconds ahead of Novikov who was a further six seconds ahead of Loeb. Loeb and Ogier returned to the top of the timing sheets for the final stage of the leg, the second running of Lamastre—Gilhoc—Alboussiere. Latvala finished third to close within twenty seconds of Hirvonen in fifth overall, whilst Julien Maurin in a privately entered Ford Fiesta RS WRC was forced out when he had an accident on the stage.

Leg 3[edit]

Sébastien Loeb won his eighth stage of the rally as the cars resumed the third leg, finishing St. Jean-en-Royans—La Cime du Mas a second and a half faster than Sébastien Ogier, while Evgeny Novikov finished the stage fourth to take a further seven seconds from Dani Sordo. 2011 winner Bryan Bouffier lost over a minute in his privately entered Citroën DS3 WRC when he spun late in the stage, losing eighth place to Mads Østberg, who later took his first stage win at the WRC level on St. Nazaire le Desert—La Motte Chalancon. Novikov finished the stage second, further closing the gap to Sordo, before finally catching him on Sisteron—Thoard. At the end of the leg, Loeb held a lead of one minute and forty-seven seconds over Ogier, who sat a minute and a half ahead of Novikov. Sordo was fourth, less than two seconds behind the Russian, while Jari-Matti Latvala finally felt comfortable with his Polo R WRC, setting the second-fastest time on Sisteron—Thoard and moving up into fifth place overall. Mikko Hirvonen slipped further down the order to sixth place, expressing dissatisfaction with his car, having developed a chronic understeer problem.

Leg 4[edit]

The final leg of the rally quickly claimed three scalps during the first pass of the famous Col de Turini stage. Evgeny Novikov crashed halfway through the stage, and depite his efforts to continue, the damage was terminal; Jari-Matti Latvala slid off the road, and was unable to rejoin the route, forcing him out; and Juho Hänninen developed a mechanical problem that brought his Ford Fiesta RS WRC to a halt. Bryan Bouffier was the surprise winner of the stage ahead of Mads Østberg in the sole surviving Fiesta and Sébastien Ogier. With Novikov out, Dani Sordo reclaimed third place and scored his only stage win of the rally on stage fifteen. Further down the order, Michał Kościuszko passed WRC-2 entrant Armin Kremer to move up into the points-socring positions in tenth, which the Polish driver would hold onto for the remainder of the rally.

Sébastien Loeb won the next stage, which would ultimately prove to be the last of the rally. Following the final service in Monaco, rally organisers decided to cancel the final two stages after they were overwhelmed with spectators. Loeb therefore won the rally, one minute and thirty-nine seconds ahead of Ogier, with Sordo in third. Mikko Hirvonen took fourth, whilst a difficult final stage for Østberg saw him lose fifth place to Bouffier. Martin Prokop took advantage of the retirements early in the day to secure seventh, ahead of Sepp Wiegand in the first of the WRC-2 entries.

WRC-2[edit]

Esapekka Lappi established an early lead in the newly created WRC-2 category, but his lead was short-lived when he hit a rock on the first pass through Le Moulinon—Antraigues. Despite setting the fastest time of the stage, his Škoda Fabia S2000 was too badly damaged to continue, and he was forced to retire. He was joined in retirement by Peugeot 207 S2000 driver Luca Betti, who ran off the road on the same stage. Sepp Wiegand, also driving a Škoda Fabia S2000, inherited the lead and held a one-minute advantage over Armin Kremer by the end of the first day.[26] Wiegand consolidated his lead on the second day, extending his lead over Kremer to four minutes when he won all six stages of Leg 2. Wiegand had a scare on the third day, when his battery shorted out on St. Nazaire le Desert—La Motte Chalancon, but he was able to pull over and repair the problem, finishing the day with a lead of nearly five minutes. A late charge from Armin Kremer on the final leg of the rally was not enough to overthrow Wiegand, who won the category and was classified eighth overall. Kremer finished second, with Ukrainian Yuiry Protasov in third.

WRC-3[edit]

Three entries were received for the WRC-3 championship, but only two cars started the event when French driver Quentin Gilbert lost his drivers' licence shortly before the event began.[26] Of the two remaining entries, Renaud Poutot in a Citroën DS3 built to R3T regulations established a one-minute lead over Sébastien Chardonnet in another DS3 during the first day. Poutot ended the first day in twentieth position, with Chardonnet in twenty-second and the two separated by Lotos Team WRC driver Michał Kościuszko.[27] Poutot's rally came to an end on stage nine when he slid off the road and into a snowbank. He was unable to get his car started, and retired on the spot, leaving Chardonnet as the sole remaining WRC-3 entry. Needing only to finish to score a full twenty-five points, Chardonnet drove cautiously throughout the remainder of the rally, and was ultimately classified thirteenth overall, forty-five minutes behind rally winner Sébastien Loeb.

Results[edit]

Event standings[edit]

Pos. No. Driver Co-driver Team Car Class Time Difference Overall Points WRC 2 / 3 Points
Overall classification
1 1 France Sébastien Loeb Monaco Daniel Elena France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT Citroën DS3 WRC WRC 5:18:57.2 +0:00.0 25
2 8 France Sébastien Ogier France Julien Ingrassia Germany Volkswagen Motorsport Volkswagen Polo R WRC WRC 5:20:37.1 +1:39.9 18
3 10 Spain Dani Sordo Spain Carlos del Barrio France Abu Dhabi Citroën Total WRT Citroën DS3 WRC WRC 5:22:46.2 +3:49.0 15
4 2 Finland Mikko Hirvonen Finland Jarmo Lehtinen France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT Citroën DS3 WRC WRC 5:24:23.5 +5:26.3 12
5 22 France Bryan Bouffier France Xavier Panseri France Bryan Bouffier Citroën DS3 WRC WRC 5:27:10.3 +8:13.1 10
6 4 Norway Mads Østberg Sweden Jonas Andersson United Kingdom Qatar M-Sport WRT Ford Fiesta RS WRC WRC 5:31:00.9 +12:03.7 8
7 21 Czech Republic Martin Prokop Czech Republic Michal Ernst Czech Republic Jipocar Czech National Team Ford Fiesta RS WRC WRC 5:42:24.5 +23:27.3 6
8 32 Germany Sepp Wiegand Germany Frank Christian Germany Škoda Auto Deutschland Škoda Fabia S2000 WRC-2 5:48:31.7 +29:34.5 4 25 (WRC 2)
9 42 Switzerland Olivier Burri Switzerland André Saucy Switzerland Olivier Burri Peugeot 207 S2000 N/A 5:54:35.4 +35:38.2 2
10 12 Poland Michał Kościuszko Poland Maciej Szczepaniak Italy Lotos Team WRC Mini John Cooper Works WRC WRC 5:55:25.2 +36:28.0 1
11 33 Germany Armin Kremer Germany Klaus Wicha Austria Stohl Racing Subaru Impreza WRC-2 5:56:57.5 +38:00.3 18 (WRC 2)
12 39 Ukraine Yuriy Protasov Estonia Kuldar Sikk Belgium Symtech Racing Subaru Impreza WRC-2 5:59:53.0 +40:55.8 15 (WRC 2)
13 51 France Sébastien Chardonnet France Thibault de la Haye France Sébastien Chardonnet Citroën DS3 R3T WRC-3 6:04:28.2 +45:31.0 25 (WRC 3)
17 36 United Arab Emirates Rashid al Ketbi Germany Karina Hepperle United Arab Emirates Skydive Dubai Rally Team Škoda Fabia S2000 WRC-2 6:14:30.2 +55:33.0 12 (WRC 2)
29 38 Mexico Ricardo Triviño Spain Àlex Haro Mexico Moto Club Igualda Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution X WRC-2 6:36:58.3 +1:18:01.1 10 (WRC 2)
Source:[28]

Leading retirements[edit]

Unlike other rallies in the World Championship, the Monte Carlo Rally does not employ "Rally 2" regulations, which allow a retired driver to re-enter the event at the start of the next leg. Because of this, any retirement from the event is permanent.

Stage No. Driver Co-driver Team Car Class Cause
52 France Quentin Gilbert France Isabelle Galmiche France Quentin Gilbert Citroën DS3 R3T WRC-3 Withdrawn before start
SS2 31 Finland Esapekka Lappi Finland Janne Ferm Czech Republic Škoda Motorsport Škoda Fabia S2000 WRC-2 Accident damage
SS2 34 Italy Luca Betti Italy Francesco Pezzoli Belgium Symtech Racing Peugeot 207 S2000 WRC-2 Off road
SS4 11 Belgium Thierry Neuville Belgium Nicolas Gilsoul United Kingdom Qatar World Rally Team Ford Fiesta RS WRC WRC Accident damage
SS9 53 France Renaud Poutot France Ludovic Viragh France Sainteloc Citroën DS3 R3T WRC-3 Off road
SS10 24 France Julien Maurin France Nicolas Klinger France Julien Maurin Ford Fiesta RS WRC WRC Accident
SS14 7 Finland Jari-Matti Latvala Finland Miikka Anttila Germany Volkswagen Motorsport Volkswagen Polo R WRC WRC Off road
SS14 5 Russia Evgeny Novikov Austria Ilka Minor United Kingdom Qatar M-Sport World Rally Team Ford Fiesta RS WRC WRC Accident damage
SS14 6 Finland Juho Hänninen Finland Tomi Tuominen United Kingdom Qatar World Rally Team Ford Fiesta RS WRC WRC Mechanical
SS14 37 Italy Lorenzo Bertelli Italy Lorenzo Granai Italy Lorenzo Bertelli Subaru Impreza WRC-2 Mechanical

Special stages[edit]

Day Stage
number
Stage name Length Stage winner Car
No.
Team Time Avg. spd. Rally leader
Leg 1
(16 Jan)
SS1 Le Moulinon—Antraigues 1 37.10 km France Sébastien Ogier[11]
France Julien Ingrassia
8 Germany Volkswagen Motorsport 27:31.8 80.89 km/h France Sébastien Ogier
France Julien Ingrassia
SS2 Burzet—St. Martial 1 30.60 km France Sébastien Loeb[12]
Monaco Daniel Elena
1 France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT 25:02.7 73.34 km/h France Sébastien Loeb
Monaco Daniel Elena
SS3 Le Moulinon—Antraigues 2 37.10 km France Sébastien Loeb[29]
Monaco Daniel Elena
1 France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT 25:16.2 88.09 km/h
SS4 Burzet—St. Martial 2 30.60 km France Sébastien Loeb[30]
Monaco Daniel Elena
1 France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT 21:54.6 83.80 km/h
Leg 2
(17 Jan)
SS5 Labatie d'Andaure—Lalouvesc 1 19.08 km France Sébastien Ogier[13]
France Julien Ingrassia
8 Germany Volkswagen Motorsport 14:22.3 79.68 km/h
SS6 St. Bonnet—St. Julien Molhesabate—St. Bonnet 1 25.45 km Russia Evgeny Novikov[14]
Austria Ilka Minor
5 United Kingdom Qatar M-Sport WRT 18:02.8 84.67 km/h
SS7 Lamastre—Gilhoc—Alboussiere 1 21.72 km Russia Evgeny Novikov[15]
Austria Ilka Minor
5 United Kingdom Qatar M-Sport WRT 17:07.5 76.13 km/h
SS8 Labatie d'Andaure—Lalouvesc 2 19.08 km France Sébastien Loeb[31]
Monaco Daniel Elena
1 France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT 13:10.1 86.95 km/h
SS9 St. Bonnet—St. Julien Molhesabate—St. Bonnet 2 25.45 km Finland Juho Hänninen[32]
Finland Tomi Tuominen
6 United Kingdom Qatar World Rally Team 17:33.2 86.99 km/h
SS10 Lamastre—Gilhoc—Alboussiere 2 21.72 km France Sébastien Loeb[33]
Monaco Daniel Elena
1 France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT 15:43.0 82.55 km/h
Leg 3
(18 Jan)
SS11 St. Jean-en-Royans—La Cime du Mas 33.19 km France Sébastien Loeb[16]
Monaco Daniel Elena
1 France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT 20:17.9 98.17 km/h
SS12 St. Nazaire le Desert—La Motte Chalancon 22.11 km Norway Mads Østberg[17]
Sweden Jonas Andersson
4 United Kingdom Qatar M-Sport WRT 15:29.5 87.56 km/h
SS13 Sisteron—Thoard 36.70 km France Sébastien Loeb[18]
Monaco Daniel Elena
1 France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT 24:17.9 90.67 km/h
Leg 4
(19 Jan)
SS14 Moulinet—La Bollene Vesubie 1 23.45 km France Bryan Bouffier[19]
France Xavier Panseri
22 France Bryan Bouffier 23:56.9 58.75 km/h
SS15 Lantosque—Lucéram 1 30.60 km Spain Dani Sordo[19]
Spain Carlos del Barrio
10 France Abu Dhabi Citroën Total WRT 15:02.7 122.12 km/h
SS16 Moulinet—La Bollene Vesubie 2 23.45 km France Sébastien Loeb[34]
Monaco Daniel Elena
1 France Citroën Total Abu Dhabi WRT 22:08.8 63.56 km/h
SS17 Moulinet—La Bollene Vesubie 3 23.45 km stages cancelled[35]
SS18 Lantosque—Lucéram 2
(Power stage)
18.95 km
Day Stage
number
Stage name Length Stage winner Car
No.
Team Time Avg. spd. Rally leader

Power stage[edit]

The "Power stage" of the rally was to be held on an 18.95 km (11.77 mi) stage between the communes of Lantosque and Lucéram in the region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, with additional World Championship points to be awarded to the three fastest drivers. However, the stage was cancelled at the last minute due to overwhelming spectator numbers blocking access to the stage, and no points were awarded.[35]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Snowy Rallye Monte-Carlo in prospect". WRC.com. 14 January 2013. Retrieved 15 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "Itineraires". acm.mc. 14 September 2012. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c "WRC.com preview: Rallye Monte-Carlo". WRC.com. 12 January 2013. Retrieved 13 January 2013. 
  4. ^ "WRC.com preview: Rallye Monte-Carlo page 3". WRC.com. 12 January 2013. Retrieved 13 January 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "81e Rallye Monte Carlo 2013 Entry List". rallye-magazin.de. Monte Carlo Rally. 20 December 2012. Retrieved 23 December 2012. 
  6. ^ Elizalde, Pablo (27 September 2012). "Sebastien Loeb to compete in World Rally Championship part-time in 2013". Autosport.com (Haymarket Publications). Retrieved 23 December 2012. 
  7. ^ Evans, David (15 January 2013). "Sebastien Loeb thrilled at prospect of snow Monte Carlo farewell". Autosport.com (Haymarket Publications). Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  8. ^ "81e Rallye Monte Carlo 2013 List of entries in seeded order". rallylink.it. Monte Carlo Rally. Retrieved 28 December 2012. 
  9. ^ a b "Rallye Monte-Carlo — Start Lists". WRC.com. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  10. ^ "Юрий Протасов меняет штурмана" [Yuriy Protasov changes co-driver]. Rally.ua (in Russian). 9 January 2013. Retrieved 9 January 2013. 
  11. ^ a b "SS1: Ogier claims maiden stage win for Volkswagen". WRC.com. 16 January 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  12. ^ a b "SS2: Loeb wins Burzet to lead at midday service". WRC.com. 16 January 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  13. ^ a b "SS5: Ogier fastest on Thursday's opener". WRC.com. 17 January 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  14. ^ a b "SS6: New studs pay dividends for Novikov". WRC.com. 17 January 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  15. ^ a b "SS7: Loeb still Monte master at Thursday midpoint". WRC.com. 17 January 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  16. ^ a b "SS11: Loeb starts leg 3 with stage win". WRC.com. 18 January 2013. Retrieved 18 January 2013. 
  17. ^ a b "SS12: Ostberg nets maiden stage victory". WRC.com. 18 January 2013. Retrieved 18 January 2013. 
  18. ^ a b "SS13: Loeb takes 1m47s lead into final leg". WRC.com. 18 January 2013. Retrieved 18 January 2013. 
  19. ^ a b c d "SS14 and SS15: Novikov, Latvala and Hanninen crash out". WRC.com. 19 January 2013. Retrieved 19 January 2013. 
  20. ^ "Surprise fast man at Monte-Carlo shakedown". SpeedCafe.com. 16 January 2013. Retrieved 26 January 2013. "On his debut with the Qatar World Rally Team, [Thierry Neuville] completed four runs through the 3.58km test, setting the best time of 2:28.7 on his final pass." 
  21. ^ a b "81ème Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo". ACM.mc. Automobile Club Monte Carlo. Retrieved 24 December 2012. 
  22. ^ Beer, Matt (16 January 2013). "Monte Carlo Rally: Sebastien Ogier and VW win opening stage". Autosport.com (Haymarket Publications). Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  23. ^ Evans, David (16 January 2013). "Monte Carlo Rally: World Rally Teams furious over timing issue". Autosport.com (Haymarket Publications). Retrieved 17 January 2012. 
  24. ^ Evans, David (16 January 2013). "Monte Carlo Rally: Timing issues leave WRC in the dark". Autosport.com (Haymarket Publications). Retrieved 17 January 2012. 
  25. ^ "WRC – Loeb dominates in Monte Carlo". Eurosport UK (Yahoo!). 16 January 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  26. ^ a b "Day 1 wrap: Loeb in control after final stage win". WRC.com. 16 January 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  27. ^ "Rallye Monte-Carlo Stage Times: SS4 BURZET – ST MARTIAL 2 (30.60km)". WRC.com. 16 January 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  28. ^ "Sebastien Loeb wins Rallye Monte-Carlo". Speedcafe.com. 20 January 2013. Retrieved 20 January 2013. 
  29. ^ "SS3: Loeb edges further ahead". WRC.com. 16 January 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  30. ^ "SS4: Loeb in control after final stage win". WRC.com. 16 January 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  31. ^ "SS8: Loeb eases to first stage win of second leg". WRC.com. 17 January 2013. Retrieved 18 January 2013. 
  32. ^ "SS9: Hanninen bags maiden stage win". WRC.com. 17 January 2013. Retrieved 18 January 2013. 
  33. ^ "SS10: Loeb stretches Monte lead". WRC.com. 17 January 2013. Retrieved 18 January 2013. 
  34. ^ "SS16: Loeb the master of the slush". WRC.com. 19 January 2013. Retrieved 19 January 2013. 
  35. ^ a b Evans, David (19 January 2013). "Monte Carlo Rally: Loeb wins as final stages cancelled". Autosport.com (Haymarket Publications). Retrieved 19 January 2013. 

External links[edit]