2013 NCAA Division I FBS football season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The 2013 NCAA Division I FBS football season, play of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) level, began on August 29, 2013, and ended on December 14, 2013, and, not including all-star games, concluded on January 6, 2014 with the 2014 BCS National Championship Game.

This was the final season with the BCS system in place for FBS football before the new four-team College Football Playoff system took effect for the 2014 season.

Rule changes[edit]

The following rule changes were made by the NCAA Football Rules Committee for the 2013 season:[1]

  • Players who intentionally deliver a blow above the shoulders of a defenseless player (targeting) will now be automatically ejected from the game in addition to the 15-yard penalty assessed. If the ejection occurs in the first half, it is for the remainder of the game. If the ejection occurs in the second half or in overtime, it is for the remainder of the game plus the first half of the next scheduled game. The ejection penalty is automatically reviewed to determine if the hit was intentional, however the yardage penalty is not reviewable (this was changed in the 2014 season to overturn the yardage penalty if the ejection was overturned).[2]
  • Blocking below the waist is now legal if done from the front side of the defender anywhere on the field, while blocks below the waist delivered from the side or back are fouls, simplifying rule changes from the 2011 and 2012 seasons.
  • In the final minute of each half, if the clock is stopped solely for an injured player, there will be an option for a 10 second runoff before the ball is put in play to cut down on teams faking injuries to stop the clock. If the clock is stopped for another reason (first down, incomplete pass, etc.) or if players from both teams are injured on the same play no runoff will occur.
  • Establishing three seconds as the minimum time required to be on the game clock to spike the ball to stop the clock and get an additional play. If one or two seconds remain on the game clock when the ball is spiked, the half or game will end.
  • Permitting the use of electronic equipment (such as wireless headsets) for game officials to communicate with each other.
  • Two players at the same position on the same team may not wear the same uniform number (example, two quarterbacks on the same team cannot wear #12).
  • Players that change numbers during a game must report to the referee, who will announce it via wireless microphone. Failure to report is an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty (15 yards).
  • Instant replay will be permitted to adjust the game clock at the end of each quarter. Previously, instant replay could only adjust the game clock at the end of each half.
  • Permitting the Big 12 Conference to experiment with an eighth official during conference games, positioned in the offensive backfield opposite the Referee (similar to the positioning of the umpire in the NFL) to assist in detecting infractions (such as holding, chop blocks, blindside hits on the quarterback, etc.) on the offensive line as well as spotting the ball and monitoring substitutions. This official will be referred to as an "alternate referee" and wear an "A" on the back of the uniform. Use of eight-man officiating crews was expanded to all FBS conferences in the 2014 season.[3]

A rule that would have required the colors of uniform jerseys and pants to contrast to the field was recommended by the Rules Committee but was denied by the Playing Rules Oversight Panel. This rule was proposed to prevent teams (such as Boise State) from wearing uniforms that matched the color of their field. Another recommended rule would have switched the side of the field on which the line-to-gain and down markers are displayed in each half but was also denied.[4]

The NCAA Legislative Council also approved a new rule that allows any FBS team with a 6–6 record entering a conference championship game to be bowl-eligible regardless of the result of the title game. Previously, such teams (for example, Georgia Tech last season and UCLA in 2011) had to seek an NCAA waiver if they lost in their conference championship.[5]

Conference realignment[edit]

On April 3, 2013, the schools remaining in the original Big East Conference, which had sold the "Big East" name to the seven Catholic schools that would leave the league to form their own conference in July 2013, announced that they would operate as the American Athletic Conference.[6]

The Western Athletic Conference dropped football as a sport after the 2012-13 season, becoming the first conference since the Big West Conference after the 2000-01 season to do so, as most of its football-playing members announced their departure for other conferences, and the 2 staying for 2013-14 temporarily became football independents.

Membership changes[edit]

School Former Conference New Conference
Florida Atlantic Owls Sun Belt C-USA
FIU Panthers Sun Belt C-USA
Georgia State Panthers CAA (FCS) Sun Belt
Houston Cougars C-USA The American
Idaho Vandals WAC FBS Independent
Louisiana Tech Bulldogs WAC C-USA
Memphis Tigers C-USA The American
Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders Sun Belt C-USA
New Mexico State Aggies WAC FBS Independent
North Texas Mean Green Sun Belt C-USA
Pittsburgh Panthers Big East ACC
San Jose State Spartans WAC Mountain West
SMU Mustangs C-USA The American
Syracuse Orange Big East ACC
Texas State Bobcats WAC Sun Belt
UCF Knights C-USA The American
Utah State Aggies WAC Mountain West
UTSA Roadrunners WAC C-USA

In 2014:

  • Independents Idaho and New Mexico State will become football-only members of the Sun Belt.
  • Louisville and Rutgers will leave The American for the ACC and Big Ten, respectively.
  • East Carolina, Tulane, and Tulsa will leave C-USA for The American.
  • Maryland, a charter member of the ACC, will leave for the Big Ten.
  • Western Kentucky will leave the Sun Belt for C-USA.
  • Old Dominion, playing an FCS Independent schedule in the first year of its FBS transition, is leaving the CAA for C-USA.
  • Appalachian State and Georgia Southern will both leave the FCS' Southern Conference for the Sun Belt.

Finally, Charlotte played its first season of football in 2013 as an FCS Independent; the 49ers will move up to C-USA in 2015.

Other headlines[edit]

  • May 14 – The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa announced that effective July 1, all of the school's men's sports teams, including football, would use the nickname of Rainbow Warriors, a combination of the school's historic name of "Rainbows" and the "Warriors" nickname used by some teams since 2000. This reversed a plan announced by UH in February 2013, under which all men's teams would use "Warriors", previously used by football, men's golf, and men's volleyball. UH had allowed men's teams to choose their own nicknames in 2000, which resulted in the baseball team using "Rainbows", the three aforementioned teams using "Warriors", and other men's teams using "Rainbow Warriors". The change did not affect UH women's sports, which continue to be known as Rainbow Wahine.[7]
  • May 20 – The organizers of the Military Bowl announced that the game, previously held at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C., would be moved to Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland effective with the upcoming 2013 edition.[8]
  • September 7 – The 2013 Michigan–Notre Dame game set a NCAA record for attendance in a game with 115,109 fans attending the game at Michigan Stadium (also known as the Big House).[9] Michigan won the game 41–30.[9]
  • October 10 – Minnesota and its head coach Jerry Kill jointly announced that Kill would take an indefinite leave of absence, effective immediately, to focus on treatment and management of his epilepsy. Kill had missed the second half of the Golden Gophers' win over Western Illinois on September 14 due to a seizure, and was unable to travel with the team to Michigan on October 5 due to his condition.[10] Minnesota named defensive coordinator Tracy Claeys as interim head coach; Kill returned to the team for the Northwestern game on October 19, but remained in the press box, allowing Claeys to direct the team from the sidelines[11] until resuming on-field duties in the second half of the Texas Bowl.[12]

Updated stadiums[edit]

Television viewers and ratings[edit]

Most watched regular season games[edit]

Excludes Conference Championships (see chart below)

Rank Date Matchup Channel Viewers TV Rating[1] Significance
1 November 30, 3:30 ET #1 Alabama 28 #4 Auburn 34 CBS 13.78 Million 8.2 Iron Bowl/Kick Bama Kick
2 September 14, 3:30 ET #1 Alabama 49 #6 Texas A&M 42 13.59 Million 8.5
3 November 9, 8:00 ET #13 LSU 17 #1 Alabama 38 11.90 Million 6.9 Alabama–LSU rivalry
4 November 30, 12:00 ET #3 Ohio State 42 Michigan 41 ABC 9.5 Million 5.8 The Game
5 September 7, 8:00 ET #14 Notre Dame 30 #17 Michigan 41 ESPN 8.65 Million 5.3 Michigan–Notre Dame rivalry/Under the Lights II
6 November 2, 8:00 ET #7 Miami 14 #2 Florida State 41 ABC 8.35 Million 5.1 Florida State–Miami rivalry
7 August 31, 8:00 ET #5 Georgia 35 #8 Clemson 38 8.14 Million 4.8 Clemson–Georgia rivalry
8 November 23, 3:30 ET #12 Texas A&M 10 #22 LSU 34 CBS 7.51 Million 4.7 LSU–Texas A&M rivalry
9 September 28, 3:30 ET #6 LSU 41 #9 Georgia 44 7.39 Million 4.6
10 October 5, 8:00 ET #4 Ohio State 40 #16 Northwestern 30 ABC 7.36 Million 4.4

Kickoff games[edit]

Rank Date Matchup Channel Viewers TV Rating Game Location
1 August 31, 5:30 ET #1 Alabama 35 Virginia Tech 10 ESPN 5.17 Million 3.0 Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game Georgia Dome, Atlanta, GA
2 August 31, 3:30 ET Mississippi State 3 #13 Oklahoma State 21 Regional ABC 3.67 Million 2.4 AdvoCare Texas Kickoff Reliant Stadium, Houston, TX
3 August 31, 9:00 ET #12 LSU 37 #20 TCU 27 ESPN 3.17 Million 1.9 Cowboys Classic AT&T Stadium, Arlington, TX

Conference championship games[edit]

Rank Date Matchup Channel Viewers TV Rating Conference Location
1 December 7, 4:00 ET #5 Missouri 42 #3 Auburn 59 CBS 14.35 Million 8.6 SEC Georgia Dome, Atlanta, GA
2 December 7, 8:17 ET #2 Ohio State 24 #10 Michigan State 34 Fox 13.90 Million 7.9 Big Ten Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianapolis, IN
3 December 7, 8:00 ET #20 Duke 7 #1 Florida State 45 ABC 5.66 Million 3.4 ACC Bank of America Stadium, Charlotte, NC
4 December 6, 8:00 ET Bowling Green 47 #14 Northern Illinois 27 ESPN2 1.87 Million 1.2 MAC Ford Field, Detroit, MI
5 December 7, 10:00 ET Utah State 17 #23 Fresno State 24 CBS 1.70 Million 1.1 MW Bulldog Stadium, Fresno, CA
6 December 7, 7:45 ET #7 Stanford 38 #11 Arizona State 14 ESPN 1.45 Million 0.9 Pac-12 Sun Devil Stadium, Tempe, AZ
7 December 7, 12:00 ET Marshall 24 Rice 41 ESPN2 449K 0.3 C-USA Rice Stadium, Houston, TX

Conference standings[edit]

2013 American Athletic Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
#10 UCF   8 0         12 1  
#15 Louisville   7 1         12 1  
Cincinnati   6 2         9 4  
Houston   5 3         8 5  
SMU   4 4         5 7  
Rutgers   3 5         6 7  
Connecticut   3 5         3 9  
South Florida   2 6         2 10  
Memphis   1 7         3 9  
Temple   1 7         2 10  
† – BCS representative as champion
Rankings from AP Poll
2013 ACC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
Atlantic
#1 Florida State x   8 0         14 0  
#8 Clemson   7 1         11 2  
Syracuse   4 4         7 6  
Boston College   4 4         7 6  
Maryland   3 5         7 6  
Wake Forest   2 6         4 8  
NC State   0 8         3 9  
Coastal
#23 Duke x   6 2         10 4  
Miami   5 3         9 4  
Virginia Tech   5 3         8 5  
Georgia Tech   5 3         7 6  
North Carolina   4 4         7 6  
Pittsburgh   3 5         7 6  
Virginia   0 8         2 10  
Championship: Florida State 45, Duke 7
† – BCS representative as champion
‡ – BCS at-large representative
x – Division champion/co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2013 Big 12 football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
#13 Baylor   8 1         11 2  
#6 Oklahoma   7 2         11 2  
#17 Oklahoma State   7 2         10 3  
Texas   7 2         8 5  
Kansas State   5 4         8 5  
Texas Tech   4 5         8 5  
TCU   2 7         4 8  
West Virginia   2 7         4 8  
Iowa State   2 7         3 9  
Kansas   1 8         3 9  
† – BCS representative as champion
‡ – BCS at-large representative
Rankings from AP Poll
2013 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
Legends
#3 Michigan State x   8 0         13 1  
Iowa   5 3         8 5  
Nebraska   5 3         9 4  
Minnesota   4 4         8 5  
Michigan   3 5         7 6  
Northwestern   1 7         5 7  
Leaders
#12 Ohio State x   8 0         12 2  
#22 Wisconsin   6 2         9 4  
Penn State*   4 4         7 5  
Indiana   3 5         5 7  
Illinois   1 7         4 8  
Purdue   0 8         1 11  
Championship: Michigan State 34, Ohio State 24
† – BCS representative as champion
‡ – BCS at-large representative
x – Division champion/co-champions
  • Penn State ineligible for conference championship game and post-season bowl games due to NCAA sanctions
    Rankings from AP Poll
2013 Conference USA football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
East Division
Marshall x   7 1         10 4  
East Carolina   6 2         10 3  
Middle Tennessee   6 2         8 5  
Florida Atlantic   4 4         6 6  
UAB   1 7         2 10  
Southern Miss   1 7         1 11  
FIU   1 7         1 11  
West Division
Rice x   7 1         10 4  
UTSA   6 2         7 5  
North Texas   6 2         9 4  
Tulane   5 3         7 6  
Louisiana Tech   3 5         4 8  
Tulsa   2 6         3 9  
UTEP   1 7         2 10  
Championship: Rice 41, Marshall 24
† – Conference champion
x – Division champion/co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2013 Division I FBS independents football records
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
#20 Notre Dame               9 4  
Navy               9 4  
BYU               8 5  
Army               3 9  
New Mexico State               2 10  
Idaho               1 11  
Rankings from AP Poll
2013 Mid-American Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
East
Bowling Green x   7 1         10 4  
Buffalo   6 2         8 5  
Ohio   4 4         7 6  
Akron   4 4         5 7  
Kent State   3 5         4 8  
Massachusetts   1 7         1 11  
Miami   0 8         0 12  
West
Northern Illinois x   8 0         12 2  
Ball State   7 1         10 3  
Toledo   5 3         7 5  
Central Michigan   5 3         6 6  
Eastern Michigan   1 7         2 10  
Western Michigan   1 7         1 11  
Championship: Bowling Green 47, Northern Illinois 27
† – Conference champion
x – Division champion/co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2013 Mountain West Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
Mountain
Utah State x   7 1         9 5  
Boise State   6 2         8 5  
Colorado State   5 3         8 6  
Wyoming   3 5         5 7  
New Mexico   1 7         3 9  
Air Force   0 8         2 10  
West
Fresno State x   7 1         11 2  
San Diego State   6 2         8 5  
UNLV   5 3         7 6  
San Jose State   5 3         6 6  
Nevada   3 5         4 8  
Hawaii   0 8         1 11  
Championship: Fresno State 24, Utah State 17
† – Conference champion
x – Division champion/co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2013 Pacific-12 football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
North
#9 Oregon x   7 2         11 2  
#11 Stanford xy   7 2         11 3  
#25 Washington   5 4         9 4  
Oregon State   4 5         7 6  
Washington State   4 5         6 7  
California   0 9         1 11  
South
#21 Arizona State x   8 1         10 4  
#16 UCLA   6 3         10 3  
#19 USC   6 3         10 4  
Arizona   4 5         8 5  
Utah   2 7         5 7  
Colorado   1 8         4 8  
Championship: Stanford 38, Arizona State 14
† – BCS representative as champion
x – Division champion/co-champions
y – Championship game participant
Rankings from AP Poll
2013 SEC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
Eastern Division
#5 Missouri x   7 1         12 2  
#4 South Carolina   6 2         11 2  
Georgia   5 3         8 5  
#24 Vanderbilt   4 4         9 4  
Florida   3 5         4 8  
Tennessee   2 6         5 7  
Kentucky   0 8         2 10  
Western Division
#2 Auburn xy   7 1         12 2  
#7 Alabama x   7 1         11 2  
#14 LSU   5 3         10 3  
#18 Texas A&M   4 4         9 4  
Mississippi State   3 5         7 6  
Ole Miss   3 5         8 5  
Arkansas   0 8         3 9  
Championship: Auburn 59, Missouri 42
† – BCS representative as champion
‡ – BCS at-large representative
x – Division champion/co-champions
y – Championship game participant
Rankings from AP Poll[14]
2013 Sun Belt football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
Louisiana–Lafayette §   5 2         9 4  
Arkansas State §   5 2         8 5  
WKU   4 3         8 4  
Louisiana–Monroe   4 3         6 6  
South Alabama   4 3         6 6  
Troy   4 3         6 6  
Texas State   2 5         6 6  
Georgia State*   0 7         0 12  
§ – Conference co-champions
  • Georgia State ineligible for post-season bowl games due to FBS transition and ineligible for Sun Belt Conference championship due to Sun Belt Conference decision.
    Rankings from AP Poll

Conference champions[edit]

Conference Champion Runner-up Championship Game Score Offensive Player of the Year Defensive Player of the Year Coach of the Year
American UCF N/A N/A Blake Bortles, UCF Marcus Smith, Louisville George O'Leary, UCF
ACC Florida State Duke 45–7 Jameis Winston, Florida State[15] Aaron Donald, Pittsburgh David Cutcliffe, Duke
Big 12 Baylor N/A N/A Bryce Petty, Baylor Jackson Jeffcoat, Texas
Jason Verrett, TCU
Art Briles, Baylor
Big Ten Michigan State Ohio State 34–24 Braxton Miller, Ohio State[16] Chris Borland, Wisconsin Mark Dantonio, Michigan State
C-USA Rice Marshall 41–24 Rakeem Cato, Marshall Shawn Jackson, Tulsa David Bailiff, Rice
MAC Bowling Green Northern Illinois 47–27 Jordan Lynch, Northern Illinois[17] Khalil Mack, Buffalo Rod Carey, Northern Illinois
MW Fresno State Utah State 24-17 Derek Carr, Fresno State Shaquil Barrett, Colorado State Matt Wells, Utah State
Pac-12 Stanford Arizona State 38–14 Ka’Deem Carey, Arizona Will Sutton, Arizona State Todd Graham, Arizona State
SEC Auburn Missouri 59–42 Tre Mason, Auburn Michael Sam, Missouri
C.J. Mosley, Alabama
Gus Malzahn, Auburn
Sun Belt Louisiana–Lafayette
Arkansas State
N/A N/A Antonio Andrews, Western Kentucky Xavius Boyd, Western Kentucky Joey Jones, South Alabama


Final BCS rankings[edit]

BCS School Record Bowl Game
1 Florida State 13–0 BCS Championship
2 Auburn 12–1
3 Alabama 11–1 Sugar Bowl
4 Michigan State 12–1 Rose Bowl Game
5 Stanford 11–2
6 Baylor 11–1 Fiesta Bowl
7 Ohio State 12–1 Orange Bowl
8 Missouri 11–2 Cotton Bowl
9 South Carolina 10–2 Capital One Bowl
10 Oregon 10–2 Alamo Bowl
11 Oklahoma 10–2 Sugar Bowl
12 Clemson 10–2 Orange Bowl
13 Oklahoma State 10–2 Cotton Bowl
14 Arizona State 10–3 Holiday Bowl
15 UCF 11–1 Fiesta Bowl
16 LSU 9–3 Outback Bowl
17 UCLA 9–3 Sun Bowl
18 Louisville 11–1 Russell Athletic Bowl
19 Wisconsin 9–3 Capital One
20 Fresno State 12–1 Las Vegas Bowl
21 Texas A&M 8–4 Chick-fil-A Bowl
22 Georgia 8–4 Gator Bowl
23 Northern Illinois 12–1 Poinsettia Bowl
24 Duke 10–3 Chick-fil-A Bowl
25 USC 9–4 Las Vegas Bowl

Bowl games[edit]

Bowl Challenge Cup standings[edit]

Conference Total games Wins Losses Pct.
Sun Belt 2 2 0 1.000
SEC 10 7 3 .700
Pac-12 9 6 3 .667
Independents 3 2 1 .667
C-USA 6 3 3 .500
MW 6 3 3 .500
American 5 2 3 .400
Big 12 6 3 3 .500
ACC 11 5 6 .455
Big Ten 7 2 5 .286
MAC 5 0 5 .000

Awards and honors[edit]

Heisman Trophy[edit]

The Heisman Trophy is given to the year's most outstanding player.

Player School Position 1st 2nd 3rd Total
Jameis Winston Florida State QB 668 84 33 2,205
AJ McCarron Alabama QB 79 162 143 704
Jordan Lynch Northern Illinois QB 40 149 140 558
Andre Williams Boston College RB 29 127 129 470
Johnny Manziel Texas A&M QB 30 103 125 421
Tre Mason Auburn RB 31 121 169 404
Bryce Petty Baylor QB 15 30 70 127

Other overall[edit]

Special overall[edit]

Offense[edit]

Quarterback

Running Back

Wide Receiver

Tight End

Lineman

Defense[edit]

Defensive Line

Defensive Back

Special teams[edit]

Coaches[edit]

Assistants[edit]

All-Americans[edit]

Coaching changes[edit]

This is restricted to coaching changes that took place on or after May 1, 2013. For coaching changes that occurred earlier in 2013, see 2012 NCAA Division I FBS end-of-season coaching changes.

School Outgoing coach Date Reason Replacement
USC Lane Kiffin September 29 Fired[18] Ed Orgeron (interim)
Connecticut Paul Pasqualoni September 30 Fired[19] T. J. Weist (interim)
Miami (OH) Don Treadwell October 6 Fired[20] Mike Bath (interim)[21]
FAU Carl Pelini October 30 Fired[22] Brian Wright (interim)
Eastern Michigan Ron English November 8 Fired[23] Stan Parrish (interim)[23]
Wyoming Dave Christensen December 1 Fired[24] Craig Bohl[25]
Wake Forest Jim Grobe December 2 Resigned[26] Dave Clawson[27]
USC Ed Orgeron Resigned Clay Helton (interim)
USC Clay Helton Permanent replacement Steve Sarkisian[28]
Washington Steve Sarkisian Hired by USC Marques Tuiasosopo (interim)
Miami (OH) Mike Bath December 3 Permanent replacement Chuck Martin[29]
Washington Marques Tuiasosopo December 6 Permanent replacement Chris Petersen[30]
Boise State Chris Petersen Hired by Washington[30] Bob Gregory (interim)
Bowling Green Dave Clawson December 10 Hired by Wake Forest[27] Adam Scheier (interim)[31]
Boise State Bob Gregory December 11 Permanent replacement Bryan Harsin[32]
Arkansas State Bryan Harsin Hired by Boise State[32] John Thompson (interim)[33]
Eastern Michigan Stan Parrish Permanent replacement Chris Creighton[34]
Connecticut T. J. Weist December 12 Permanent replacement Bob Diaco[35]
Texas Mack Brown December 14 Resigned[36] Charlie Strong[37]
Army Rich Ellerson December 15 Fired[38] Jeff Monken
FAU Brian Wright December 17 Permanent replacement Charlie Partridge [39]
Bowling Green Adam Scheier December 18 Permanent replacement Dino Babers[40]
Arkansas State John Thompson December 19 Permanent replacement Blake Anderson[41]
Massachusetts Charley Molnar December 26 Fired Mark Whipple
Penn State Bill O'Brien January 2, 2014 Hired by the Houston Texans[42] James Franklin
Louisville Charlie Strong January 5, 2014 Hired by Texas[37] Bobby Petrino[43]
Western Kentucky Bobby Petrino January 9, 2014 Hired by Louisville[43] Jeff Brohm[44]
UAB Garrick McGee Hired as offensive coordinator at Louisville[45] Bill Clark[46]
Vanderbilt James Franklin Hired by Penn State Derek Mason

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ CBS Sports (February 13, 2013). "NCAA Rules Panel approves ejections for targeted hits to head". cbssports.com. Retrieved 13 February 2013. 
  2. ^ AP (October 4, 2013). "NCAA targeting calls will now have automatic review". espn.com. Retrieved 5 October 2013. 
  3. ^ CBS Sports (July 22, 2013). "Big 12 adds eighth official just to keep up with up-tempo offenses". cbssports.com. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 
  4. ^ NCAA.org (March 7, 2013). "NCAA Rules Panel approves more stringent penalty in football". ncaa.org. Retrieved 7 March 2013. 
  5. ^ "Midnight Madness to start earlier". ESPN.com. May 3, 2013. Retrieved May 4, 2013. 
  6. ^ "New Name in College Sports - Current BIG EAST Enters New Era as 'American Athletic Conference'" (Press release). Big East Conference. April 3, 2013. Retrieved April 3, 2013. 
  7. ^ Associated Press (May 14, 2013). "Hawaii to keep 'Rainbow' in name". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 21, 2013. 
  8. ^ Patterson, Chip (May 20, 2013). "Military Bowl moving to Annapolis, adds Conference USA for '13". Eye on College Football (CBSSports.com). Retrieved May 21, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b Fornelli, Tom (September 7, 2013). "Michigan Stadium sets single-game NCAA attendance record". CBS Sports. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Jerry Kill to continue treatment". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 10, 2013. Retrieved October 10, 2013. 
  11. ^ Maisel, Ivan (November 20, 2013). "Jerry Kill changes the game plan". ESPN.com. Retrieved November 25, 2013. 
  12. ^ Bennett, Brian (February 22, 2014). "Jerry Kill extendedthrough 2018". ESPN.com. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  13. ^ "An Update to Tiger Nation". Missouri Athletics. August 19, 2013. Retrieved December 8, 2013. 
  14. ^ Link to the AP Poll
  15. ^ "Winston Named ACC Player of the Year" (Press release). Atlantic Coast Conference. December 4, 2013. Retrieved December 4, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Ohio State's Miller Claims Wins Second Graham-George Offensive Player of the Year Award" (Press release). Big Ten Conference. December 3, 2013. Retrieved December 9, 2013. 
  17. ^ Ryan, Shannon (December 4, 2013). "Lynch, Carey earn MAC top awards". Chicago Tribune. 
  18. ^ "Trojans dismiss coach Lane Kiffin". ESPNLA.com. September 19, 2013. Retrieved September 29, 2013. 
  19. ^ "UConn fires Paul Pasqualoni". ESPN.com. Associated Press. September 30, 2013. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Treadwell Relieved of Duties" (Press release). Miami University Athletics. October 6, 2013. Retrieved October 7, 2013. 
  21. ^ "Bath Named Interim Head Football Coach" (Press release). Miami University Athletics. October 6, 2013. Retrieved October 7, 2013. 
  22. ^ "FAU now says Carl Pelini has been fired with cause" (Press release). CBSSPORTS.COM. November 26, 2013. Retrieved December 2, 2013. 
  23. ^ a b "Eastern Michigan fires Ron English". ESPN.com. ESPN.com news services. November 8, 2013. Retrieved November 8, 2013. 
  24. ^ "Wyoming fires Dave Christensen". ESPN.com. December 1, 2013. Retrieved December 2, 2013. 
  25. ^ Vorel, Mike (December 7, 2013). "North Dakota State's Bohl will become Wyoming's next head coach". Casper Star-Tribune. Retrieved December 7, 2013. 
  26. ^ "Jim Grobe resigns". ESPN.com. December 2, 2013. Retrieved December 3, 2013. 
  27. ^ a b "Source: Wake hires Dave Clawson". ESPN.com. December 10, 2013. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  28. ^ "Steve Sarkisian hired as USC head coach". ESPN.com. December 2, 2012. Retrieved December 2, 2012. 
  29. ^ "Miami (OH) hires Notre Dame OC Chuck Martin as next head coach". CBSSports.com. December 3, 2012. Retrieved December 3, 2012. 
  30. ^ a b "Washington hires Chris Petersen". ESPN.com. December 6, 2013. Retrieved December 6, 2013. 
  31. ^ "Adam Scheier Named Interim Head Coach" (Press release). Bowling Green Athletics. December 10, 2013. Retrieved December 11, 2013. 
  32. ^ a b "Bryan Harsin Hired as Boise State Football Head Coach" (Press release). Boise State Athletics. December 11, 2013. Retrieved December 11, 2013. 
  33. ^ "Harsin Steps Down as A-State Head Football Coach" (Press release). Arkansas State Red Wolves. December 11, 2013. Retrieved December 11, 2013. 
  34. ^ "Chris Creighton Named EMU Head Football Coach" (Press release). Eastern Michigan Eagles. December 11, 2013. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  35. ^ "Bob Diaco Named New Head Football Coach" (Press release). University of Connecticut Huskies. December 12, 2013. Retrieved December 13, 2013. 
  36. ^ "Brown steps down as Texas head football coach" (Press release). Texas Longhorns Athletics. December 14, 2013. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  37. ^ a b "Charlie Strong named Texas Football head coach" (Press release). Texas Longhorns Athletics. January 5, 2014. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  38. ^ "Army Announces Football Coaching Change" (Press release). Army Black Knights. December 15, 2013. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  39. ^ "Florida Atlantic hires Charlie Partridge as coach". Washington Post.com. December 17, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2013. [dead link]
  40. ^ Schad, Joe (December 18, 2013). "Bowling Green hires Dino Babers". ESPN.com. Retrieved December 18, 2013. 
  41. ^ "Anderson Named Arkansas State Head Football Coach" (Press release). Arkansas State Red Wolves. December 19, 2013. Retrieved December 19, 2013. 
  42. ^ Burke, Chris (December 31, 2013). "Bill O’Brien to be named Texans’ new head coach". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 1, 2014. 
  43. ^ a b "Petrino Returning Home as Football Head Coach" (Press release). University of Louisville Athletics. January 9, 2014. Retrieved January 9, 2014. 
  44. ^ "WKU Names Jeff Brohm 19th Head Coach of Hilltopper Football" (Press release). WKU Athletics. January 10, 2014. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  45. ^ Champlin, Drew (January 9, 2014). "Garrick McGee dumps UAB head coaching job for assistant post at Louisville". AL.com. Retrieved January 9, 2014. 
  46. ^ "UAB to hire Bill Clark". ESPN.com. ESPN.com news services. January 21, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014. 

External links[edit]