2013 in New Zealand

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2013 in New Zealand
Decades:

Incumbents[edit]

Regal and vice-regal[edit]

Government[edit]

2013 is the second full year of the 50th Parliament, which first sat on 20 December 2011 and will dissolve on 17 December 2014 if not dissolved prior. The Fifth National Government, first elected in 2008, continues.

Other Party leaders[edit]

Main centre leaders[edit]

Local elections for all city and district councils will be held on 12 October.

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

  • 20 May – A morning peak commuter train derails on the approach to Wellington Railway Station, puncturing a hole in a carriage's floor in the process. Four people are injured and thousands of commuters are stranded as the line into the city is blocked.[7]

June[edit]

  • 20–21 June – Wellington is hit by a storm, described to be the worst since the 1968 Wahine storm, with winds reaching 200 km/h. Thousands of homes lose power and part of the Hutt Valley rail line is washed out, causing severe congestion on roads for a week while it is repaired.
  • 29 June – Meka Whaitiri wins the Ikaroa-Rāwhiti by-election, replacing the late Parekura Horomia.

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

  • 15 September – David Cunliffe is elected leader of the Labour Party.
  • 29 September – The Lower North Island and East Cape will complete digital television transition when it switches off analogue television signals at 3:00 am.[6]

October[edit]

  • 12 October – Elections held for all local councils, regional councils and district health boards.[9]

November[edit]

December[edit]

  • 1 December – The Upper North Island becomes the last region to complete digital television transition bringing to an end 53 years of analogue television broadcasts in New Zealand.[6]
  • 11 December – New Zealand's population reaches the 4,500,000 mark, according to Statistics New Zealand estimates.[10]

Future and predicted events[edit]

Holidays and observances[edit]

Sport[edit]

Shooting[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

  • 1 July – Maureen Waaka, politician, beauty pageant contestant (born c.1943)
  • 25 July – Barnaby Jack, computer security expert (born 1977)

August[edit]

September[edit]

  • 10 September – Mel Cooke, rugby league player (born 1934)
  • 11 September – Albert Jones, amateur astronomer (born 1920)

October[edit]

  • 21 October – Karl Sim, artist and art forger (born 1923)
  • 23 October – Ted Thorne, naval officer (born 1923)
  • 25 October – Ron Ackland, rugby league player and coach (born 1934)

November[edit]

December[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lt Gen The Rt Hon Sir Jerry Mateparae. Governor-General of New Zealand. Retrieved 8 June 2012
  2. ^ "Callaghan Innovation". Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment. 1 February 2013. 
  3. ^ "2013 Census". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  4. ^ "Three die on roads over Easter". 3 News NZ. April 2, 2013. 
  5. ^ Davison, Isaac (14 March 2013). "Gay bill bolts over hurdle". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 14 March 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c "When is my area going digital?". Going Digital. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  7. ^ "Wellington trains stopped after derailment". Fairfax NZ News. 20 May 2013. Retrieved 20 May 2013. 
  8. ^ "Labour leader David Shearer steps down". The New Zealand Herald. 22 August 2013. Retrieved 24 September 2013. 
  9. ^ "2013 Local Elections FAQs". Electoral Commission. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  10. ^ Manning, Brendan; Tait, Morgan (12 December 2013). "NZ population growth: Baby makes 4.5 million". The New Zealand Herald (Auckland). Retrieved 12 December 2013. 
  11. ^ "New Zealand champion shot / Ballinger Belt winners". National Rifle Association of New Zealand. Retrieved 18 April 2014.