2013 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 2013 throughout the world.

Champions[edit]

Major League Baseball[edit]

  • Regular Season Champions
League Eastern Division Champions Central Division Champions Western Division Champions Wild Card Qualifier 1 Wild Card Qualifier 2
American League Boston Red Sox Detroit Tigers Oakland Athletics Cleveland Indians Tampa Bay Rays
National League Atlanta Braves St. Louis Cardinals Los Angeles Dodgers Pittsburgh Pirates Cincinnati Reds
  • Postseason
  Wild Card Game
TV: TBS
Division Series
TV: TBS;
MLB Network
League Championship Series
TV: Fox (ALCS);
TBS (NLCS)
World Series
TV: Fox
                                     
    1  Boston 3  
4  Cleveland 0     5  Tampa Bay 1    
  1  Boston 4  
5  Tampa Bay 1     American League
  3  Detroit 2    
2  Oakland 2
   
  3  Detroit 3  
    AL  Boston 4
  NL  St. Louis 2
    1  St. Louis 3    
4  Pittsburgh 1     4  Pittsburgh 2    
  1  St. Louis 4
5  Cincinnati 0     National League
  3  LA Dodgers 2  
2  Atlanta 1
   
  3  LA Dodgers 3  

Other Champions[edit]


Awards and honors[edit]

  • Woman Executive of the Year (major or minor league): Joan McGrath, Arizona Fall League

Major League Baseball[edit]

BBWAA awards

Major League Baseball awards

Sporting News Awards

Players Choice Awards

Other Awards

Silver Slugger Awards

American League National League
Player Team Position Player Team
Chris Davis Baltimore Orioles First baseman Paul Goldschmidt Arizona Diamondbacks
Robinson Canó New York Yankees Second baseman Matt Carpenter St. Louis Cardinals
Miguel Cabrera Detroit Tigers Third baseman Pedro Alvarez Pittsburgh Pirates
J. J. Hardy Baltimore Orioles Shortstop Ian Desmond Washington Nationals
Mike Trout Los Angeles Angels Outfielder Andrew McCutchen Pittsburgh Pirates
Torii Hunter Detroit Tigers Outfielder Michael Cuddyer Colorado Rockies
Adam Jones Baltimore Orioles Outfielder Jay Bruce Cincinnati Reds
Joe Mauer Minnesota Twins Catcher Yadier Molina St. Louis Cardinals
David Ortiz Boston Red Sox Designated hitter / Pitcher Zack Greinke Los Angeles Dodgers

Gold Glove Awards

American League National League
Player Team Position Player Team
Eric Hosmer Kansas City Royals First baseman Paul Goldschmidt Arizona Diamondbacks
Dustin Pedroia Boston Red Sox Second baseman     Brandon Phillips Cincinnati Reds
Manny Machado Baltimore Orioles Third baseman Nolan Arenado Colorado Rockies
J. J. Hardy Baltimore Orioles Shortstop Andrelton Simmons Atlanta Braves
Alex Gordon Kansas City Royals Left fielder Carlos González Colorado Rockies
Adam Jones Baltimore Orioles Center fielder Carlos Gómez Milwaukee Brewers
Shane Victorino Boston Red Sox Right fielder Gerardo Parra Arizona Diamondbacks
Salvador Pérez Kansas City Royals Catcher Yadier Molina St. Louis Cardinals
R. A. Dickey Toronto Blue Jays Pitcher Adam Wainwright St. Louis Cardinals

Minor League Baseball[edit]

Regular season events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

  • February 7 – At Winter Baseball, Doug Clark hit a solo home run in the top of the 18th inning to lead Mexico's Yaquis de Obregón beat Dominican Republic's Leones del Escogido, 4–3, to clinch the 2013 Caribbean Series final. The game lasted seven hour and 28 minutes, making it the longest game in Caribbean Series 55-year history. The previous record of six hours, 13 minutes was set in the 2007 Opening Game, when Tony Batista of the Dominican Republic hit a bases-loaded sacrifice fly in the 18th inning to give his team a 4–3 victory over Venezuela. Mexico's pitcher Luis Mendoza was named the Most Valuable Player of the event.[2]
  • February 18 – For the first time since salary arbitration began in 1974, none of the MLB players who filed wound up arguing their cases. After peaking at 35 hearings in 1986, the number of salary arbitration cases argued has not reached double digits since 2001. The total of cases dropped to a record low of three in 2005, 2009 and 2011, and then there were none at all this year. All 133 players who filed last month settled, gaining an average increase of 119 per cent, according to a study by The Associated Press.[3]

March[edit]

  • March 5 – Major League Baseball intends to expand the use of instant replay for the 2014 season and will be studying over the course of this year which calls to review and how to do it. League officials plan to visit Miami during the World Baseball Classic and various spring training sites to examine camera angles and other factors that will help them develop a plan.[4]
  • March 19 – At AT&T Park, the Dominican Republic blanked Puerto Rico, 3–0, to complete the most dominant championship run in the brief history of the World Baseball Classic. The Dominican team, managed by Tony Peña, capped an 8–0 unbeaten run to become the first undefeated champion team in the tournament. New York Yankees second baseman Robinson Canó earned MVP honors, after batting an average of .469 (15-for-32) with two home runs and six RBIs, while Tampa Bay Rays closer Fernando Rodney finished for his seventh save to extend his own Classic record. The losing team would congratulate the winner on the field, a sportsmanlike and uncommon gesture in MLB playoff games.[5]
  • March 31 – In their American League debut, the Houston Astros defeat the Texas Rangers, 8–2, at Minute Maid Park. The victory is the 4,000th in the franchise's history, who had played in the National League for 51 years, the first three (19621964) as the Houston Colt .45's.[6]

April[edit]

May[edit]

  • May 2:
    • Major League Baseball announced that Atlanta Braves outfielder Justin Upton and Baltimore Orioles outfielder Chris Davis were named players of the month for April in the National League and American League, respectively.[14] In his first season in Atlanta, Upton batted a .299 average with 12 home runs and 19 RBI’s while leading the Braves to a 17–9 April record. Davis is in third season with the Orioles, but has finally tapped into his potential. Through the first month of the season, he hit .348 with nine home runs and 28 RBI’s while posting an OPS of 1.141.
    • Clay Buchholz of the Boston Red Sox was named the American League Pitcher of the Month. In his five starts, Buchholz registered a perfect 5–0 record with a 1.19 ERA, 39 strikeouts and 13 walks over 37 23 innings of work, to help the Red Sox match a club record with 18 wins in April, a month mark also achieved in 1998 and 2003. This is Buchholz's second pitcher of the month award. He previously won the honor in August 2010.[15] Meanwhile, his counterpart Matt Harvey of the New York Mets was voted the Pitcher of the Month in the National League. Harvey went 4–0 in six starts, while his 1.56 ERA ranked third and his 46 strikeouts tied for fourth in the league. Harvey also became the first pitcher in the modern era to win his first four starts while allowing 10-of-fewer hits in that span.[16]
    • Justin Grimm of the Texas Rangers was named the American League Rookie of the Month for April. Grimm posted a 2-0 record and a 1.59 ERA, striking out 15 batters while walking four in 17.0 innings over three starts. Grimm was tied for first among AL rookie pitchers in wins, finished fourth overall in innings pitched, and limited his oponnents to a .239 average.[17] In the National League, Atlanta Braves catcher Evan Gattis earned Rookie of the Month honors for the month of April. In 21 games, Gattis led all major league rookies with six home runs, 16 RBI, a .566 slugging percentage and 43 total bases, while hitting .250 (19-for-76). The 26-year-old, who was selected by the Braves in the 23rd round of the 2010 First-Year Player Draft, ranked third among qualifying NL rookies in hitting, was tied for second with nine runs scored and finished fourth in hits. He also led all rookies with a club-high five game-winning RBI in his first month in the majors.[18]
  • May 7 – Toronto Blue Jays pitcher J. A. Happ is struck in the head by a batted ball hit by Tampa Bay Rays outfielder Desmond Jennings. Happ suffered a head contusion and a left ear laceration. He left the field on a stretcher.[19]
  • May 10:
    • Shelby Miller was perfect after allowing a leadoff single by Eric Young, Jr., retiring 27 in a row for his first career complete game, in a St. Louis Cardinals 3–0 victory over the Colorado Rockies.[20]
    • Jon Lester hurled a one-hit, complete game shutout, to lead the Boston Red Sox to a 5–0 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays. Almost perfect, Lester retired the first 17 batters he faced before giving up a double to Maicer Izturis in the bottom of the sixth inning. After that, he retired the last Toronto 10 batters in succession.[21]
    • Alex Cobb of the Tampa Bay Rays struck out 13 in 4 23 innings against the San Diego Padres, recording 12-of-14 outs in strikeouts, four of them in the third inning, when a wild pitch on strike three allowed Will Venable to reach base. The other outs were recorded on grounders to shortstop in the first and third base in the fourth. The Rays won, 6–3, but Cobb did not have a decision. Nevertheless, Cobb became the first pitcher in major league history to strikeout 13 while failing to complete five innings.[22]
  • May 12 – Chris Sale of the Chicago White Sox was not perfect against the Los Angeles Angels, but he was about as close as possible. Sale gave up just one hit to Mike Trout in the top of the seventh inning in a dominant 3–0 win. He walked no one, struck out seven, and faced just one more batter than the minimum.[23]
  • May 13 – Justin Masterson pitched a four-hitter for his second shut out this season, leading the Cleveland Indians over the New York Yankees, 1–0. Masterson (6-2) also had one against the Chicago White Sox on April 12,[24] becoming the first Cleveland pitcher to record two complete-game shutouts in the same season since Bud Black and Greg Swindell did it in 1989.[25]
  • May 14 – The Philadelphia Phillies have signed 17-year-old German outfielder Julsan Kamara to a seven-year minor league contract, writes Philipp Wuerfel of Mister-Baseball.com.[26] Considered one of Germany's best prospects, Kamara attended the MLB European Academy in Tirrenia, Italy. He is a member of the German Junior National Team, and competed in last winter's International Power Showcase at Marlins Park in Miami.[27]
  • May 18 - Gerardo Parra of the Arizona Diamondbacks hits a home run off the first pitch of the game from Tom Koehler, which holds up as the only run in the D-backs' 1–0 win against the Miami Marlins. It is the first MLB game in which a first-pitch homer was the only score since September 2, 1963, when Pete Rose's first-pitch shot gave the Cincinnati Reds a 1–0 win over the New York Mets.[28]
  • May 19:
  • May 21 – Mike Trout hit for the cycle and drove in five runs, scored two times and stole a base, in the Los Angeles Angels' 12–0 rout of the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium. At 21 years, 288 days of age, Trout became the youngest player in MLB history to hit for a cycle, being surpassed only by Mel Ott (20-75 in 1929), Cliff Heathcote (20-140 in 1918), Arky Vaughan (21-107 in 1933), César Cedeño (21-159 in 1972) and Mike Tiernan (21-21 in 1888).[31]
  • May 24 - At Comerica Park, Aníbal Sánchez of the Detroit Tigers has his bid for a second career no-hitter broken up in the ninth as the Minnesota Twins' Joe Mauer singles with one out. The hit is the only one Sánchez allows as the Tigers defeat the Twins 6-0. Sánchez, who no-hit the Arizona Diamondbacks while pitching for the Florida Marlins in 2006, was bidding to become the sixth pitcher to throw no-hitters in both leagues, joining Cy Young, Jim Bunning, Nolan Ryan, Hideo Nomo and Randy Johnson. Mauer, who also broke up no-hit bids in the ninth inning in 2008 and 2010, becomes only the second player, after Horace Clarke, to break up three no-hitters in the ninth inning; all three bids Clarke broke up were during a one-month span in 1970.[32]
  • May 30:
    • The New York Mets swept the New York Yankees for the first time in Subway Series history by completing a 3–1 victory at Yankee Stadium. Dillon Gee struck out a career-high 12 and limited the Yankees to four hits over 7 13 innings, while Marlon Byrd batted a two-run, second-deck home run. The Mets outscored their crosstown rivals in the sweep, 16–7, with the two first games played at Citi Field. Since the start of interleague play in 1997, the only Subway Series sweep had been materialized by the Yankees, when they went 6-0 in 2003.[33]
    • Jacoby Ellsbury of the Boston Red Sox stole a team-record five bases in a 9–2 victory against the host Philadelphia Phillies. Interestingly, none of them led to a run. The five stolen bases were the most for a major league player since Tampa Bay’s Carl Crawford stole six bases against the Red Sox on May 3, 2009.[34]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

  • August 2 - Jarred Cosart of the Houston Astros held the Minnesota Twins to one run and five hits over seven innings, but he did not factor into the decision in Astros' 4–3 loss in 13 innings. Cosart, who almost pitched a no-hitter in his debut on July 12, became the first pitcher since Cincinnati Reds' Wayne Simpson in 1970 to give up one earned run or fewer and throw at least six innings in each of his first four career appearances.[75]
  • August 5:
    • Adrián Beltré of the Texas Rangers and Jayson Werth of the Washington Nationals were named Player of the Month in the American League and National League respectively. Beltré earned his third such honor with the Rangers and fourth overall, while batting a .369 average with four doubles, nine home runs, 19 RBIs and 13 runs scored over 26 games, which included 69 total bases and his seventh career walk-off homer. Werth amassed ten multihit games over the course of the month, ending with a second-best .367 average, 56 total bases, 17 runs scored and a .622 slugging percentage (fourth). It was the first career Player of the Month Award for Werth and the first ever for the Nationals. Vladimir Guerrero was the last player to receive the honor while the Montreal Expos in 2003.[76]
    • Chris Archer of the Tampa Bay Rays and Clayton Kershaw of the Los Angeles Dodgers earned Pitcher of the Month honors in the American League and National League apiece. Archer also became the sixth player to win the Pitcher and Rookie of the Month awards since the latter was introduced in 2001, after posting a perfect 4–0 record with a 0.73 ERA, two shutouts, seven walks and 22 strikeouts in 37 innings of work. Kershaw went 4–1 in six starts and led the National League with a 1.34 ERA, allowing only seven earned runs in 47 innings, also a league lead. He notched 43 strikeouts for the month and issued just two walks, tying for first in wins while holding opposing hitters to a .161 batting average. The NL Rookie of the Month award was presented to José Fernández of the Miami Marlins, who posted a 3-1 record and a 2.06 ERA through five starts. The highest point of his stellar month was his July 28 outing against the Pittsburgh Pirates and his fellow prospect Gerrit Cole, by surrendering two runs on five hits in eight innings and striking out 13 batters without any walks, to join Gary Nolan (15 strikeouts, 1967), Dwight Gooden (two 16-strikeout games, 1984) and Kerry Wood (20 strikeouts, 1998) as the only pitchers younger than 21 to strike out 13 batters or more without a walk in a single game. Fernández also was notable on July 16 during a perfect inning of relief in the All-Star Game, when he retired current MLB home run leader Chris Davis and former American League Most Valuable Player Award winners Dustin Pedroia and Miguel Cabrera.[76]
    • Major League Baseball suspended Alex Rodriguez through the end of the 2014 season and banned 12 others for 50 games, including All-Stars Nelson Cruz, Everth Cabrera and Jhonny Peralta, for their connection the Biogenesis baseball scandal.[77]
  • August 7 - The MLB Players Association filed a formal appeal of the 211-game suspension that Major League Baseball levied against Alex Rodriguez for his relationship with the Biogenesis of America clinic. The suspension was to begin on August 8 and last through the 2014 season, but Rodriguez will be allowed to play until the grievance has been heard by arbitrator Fredric Horowitz, which is not expected until at least November.[78]
  • August 8 - Max Scherzer became the first Detroit Tigers pitcher ever to go 17–1 in his first 18 decisions while the Tigers completed their first four-game of the Cleveland Indians in 25 years. No major league pitcher has been 17–1 through 18 starts since New York Yankees' Roger Clemens in 2001. Just two other big league pitchers, Pittsburgh Pirates' Roy Face in 1959 and Brooklyn Dodgers' Don Newcombe in 1955, have done it since New York Giants' Rube Marquard historic 19–0 start in 1912.[79]
  • August 13 - Brad Miller hit two home runs as the Seattle Mariners topped the Tampa Bay Rays, 5–4, at Tropicana Field. Ben Zobrist matched Miller with a pair of homers for the Rays, as they both homered to lead off the first inning and then went deep again in the fifth.[80] It was just the third time in Major League Baseball history that leadoff hitters for both clubs homered in their first at-bat and then hit another later in the game. Joe Morgan did it for the Houston Astros on July 8, 1965, while Felipe Alou of the Milwaukee Brewers also clubbed a pair of homers from the top spot in the order in the same contest at County Stadium.[81] The other came on June 5, 1994, when Chuck Knoblauch of the Minnesota Twins and Tony Phillips of the Detroit Tigers accomplished the double feat at Tiger Stadium.[82]
  • August 16 - Charlie Manuel, the winningest manager in Philadelphia Phillies history, was dismissed just four days from earning his 1,000th career managerial victory. The Phillies third-base coach Ryne Sandberg was named interim manager. Manuel ended his nine-year tenure as Phillies manager with a 1,416–780 record, five straight National League East titles from 2007–2011 and two National League pennants, while guiding his team to the 2008 World Series title, the second in franchise history. Nevertheless, he became the first victim of a disappointing season for the Phillies, in which injuries and widespread underperformance led the team to a 53-67 record at the time of his dismissal. Previously, Manuel spent three years as manager with the Cleveland Indians, leading them to the AL Central title in 2001, compiling a 220–190 record as Indians manager.[83][84]
  • August 17 - Miguel Tejada is suspended for 105 games after testing positive for an amphetamine which was in violation of Major League Baseball's Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. The suspension is the third-longest non-lifetime suspension handed out by Major League Baseball, after the 211-game ban handed to Alex Rodriguez on August 5 of this season and a 119-game ban handed to Steve Howe in 1992.[85]
  • August 18 - Ryne Sandberg earned his first win as a major league manager, while the Philadelphia Phillies benefited from two ninth-inning errors by shortstop Hanley Ramírez to beat the visiting Los Angeles Dodgers, 3–2, to snap Dodgers' 10-game winning streak.[86]
  • August 21 - Ichiro Suzuki collects his 4,000th hit in a career split between the Major Leagues and Japan. In the New York Yankees' 4–2 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium, Suzuki lines a first-inning single off the Jays' R. A. Dickey, the ball eluding third baseman Brett Lawrie. Suzuki also breaks a tie with Lou Gehrig with this, his 2,722nd Major League hit in his 13th season. Previously, Suzuki amassed 1,278 hits in nine seasons in Japan's Pacific League.[87]

September[edit]

  • September 3 - The Pittsburgh Pirates, aided by Andrew McCutchen's 100th career home run and Travis Snider's ninth-inning pinch-hit home run, ended their North American sports league record of 20 consecutive losing seasons by defeating the Milwaukee Brewers, 4–3, at Miller Park. The victory was the Pirates' 81st of the season and assures them of their first non-losing season since 1992, when they won the National League East title.[88]
  • September 4:
    • Miguel Cabrera of the Detroit Tigers and Martín Prado of the Arizona Diamondbacks were named Player of the Month in the American League and National League respectively. Cabrera, the reigning AL MVP and 2012 Triple Crown winner, earned his fourth career monthly award and second in the current season. He posted a .356 batting average with a .430 on-base percentage for the month and a .733 of slugging, which included 11 home runs, five doubles, a .733 slugging percentage and 31 RBIs. Cabrera's month was highlighted by a four-game stretch of multiple-hit games from August 9–12, including a .538 average while hitting a double, three homers, five RBIs and four runs in three games against the New York Yankees.[89] Prado, acquired by Arizona prior the season, led the National League with 30 RBIs and 43 hits, while his .375 average was the fourth-best mark in the league and his 65 total bases were the second-highest number in the circuit. He also tied for fifth in runs (19), while his slugging percentage (.565) and on-base percentage (.425) both ranked him ninth.[90]
    • Iván Nova of the New York Yankees and Zack Greinke of the Los Angeles Dodgers earned Pitcher of the Month honors in the American League and National League apiece. Nova finished the month with a perfect 4–0 record and a 2.08 ERA, including one complete-game, three-hit shutout. He also collected 12 walks and 31 strikeouts in 43 13 innings over six starts to claim his first career monthly award.[91] Greinke, who previously won an AL Pitcher of the Month Award in April 2009 as a member the Kansas City Royals, went 5–0 with 30 strikeouts and eight walks over 36 23 innings of work, posting a 1.23 ERA in the process. For the second consecutive month, a Dodgers pitcher took home NL Pitcher of the Month honors. Clayton Kershaw claimed the Award for July.[92]
    • Martín Pérez of the Kansas City Royals was voted American League Rookie of the Month for August. The 22-year left-handed pitcher won all five of his starts in the month, while collecting a 3.06 ERA with 26 strikeouts and 11 walks in 35 13 innings pitched, to become the only Texas rookie ever to win five consecutive starts and the first pitcher overall to do so since Ryan Dempster won five straight from August 20–September 12 of 2012. Pérez also led AL rookies in wins, ending second in innings and fourth in strikeouts.[93] José Fernández of the Miami Marlins was named Rookie of the Month in the National League, to become the first rookie pitcher to receive the Award in back-to-back months since Josh Johnson in May and June 2006. Fernández went 3–1 in six starts, allowing six earned runs in 39 innings for a 1.15 ERA – the second lowest among qualifying rookie pitchers (Alex Wood, 0.90) and the third lowest in the league overall (Clayton Kershaw, 1.01) in August. Fernández also held opposing hitters to a paltry .158 batting average, the lowest mark among qualifying Major League pitchers. He also struck out 49 batters in 39 innings, allowing 11 walks, while breaking his own franchise rookie record with 14 strikeouts against the Cleveland Indians on August 2. He previously set the franchise mark with 13 strikeouts in his final July start against the Pittsburgh Pirates.[94]
  • September 6 - In defeating his former team, the Arizona Diamondbacks, 3-0 at AT&T Park, Yusmeiro Petit of the San Francisco Giants has a bid for a perfect game broken up with two out of the ninth—and with one strike to go. After retiring the first 26 batters, Petit, who struck out seven, gets to a 2-2 count on Eric Chavez and narrowly misses throwing the next pitch for the third strike. One pitch later, Chavez lines a ball to right field that falls in for a hit despite Hunter Pence's attempt to make a diving catch (ironically, Pence, who scored all three Giant runs, including an eight-inning home run, had made a diving catch to preserve Tim Lincecum's no-hitter on July 13). The hit is the only baserunner Petit allows; he retires the next batter, A. J. Pollock, for the final out. With teammate Matt Cain having pitched his perfect game a year earlier, the Giants would have joined the New York Yankees as the only teams to record perfect games in back-to-back seasons, David Wells having pitched his in 1998 and David Cone pitching his in 1999. It is also the first time that two perfect game bids were broken up with two out in the ninth in the same season, Yu Darvish of the Texas Rangers having his bid broken up on April 2.[95]
  • September 8 - The International Olympic Committee votes to reinstate wrestling as an Olympic Sport for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. The vote bypasses a joint bid by baseball and softball.
  • September 9 - In defeating the Texas Rangers 1-0, the Pittsburgh Pirates clinch their first winning season since 1992.
  • Seotember 11 - The defending World Champion San Francisco Giants are eliminated from postseason contention, thus the 2000 New York Yankees remain baseball's last repeat World Champions.
  • September 13 - In the Baltimore Orioles' 5-3 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays at the Rogers Centre, Chris Davis hits his 50th home run of the season, tying the single-season franchise record set by Brady Anderson in 1996. With 40 doubles, Davis also becomes the third player in Major League history with 50 home runs and 40 doubles in the same season, joining Babe Ruth in 1921 and Albert Belle in 1995.[96]
  • September 14 - Vladimir Guerrero formally announced his retirement after failing to secure a contract this season. A nine-time All Star, the Dominican slugger spent 16 major league seasons as an outfielder and designated hitter from 1996–2011, playing for the Montreal Expos, Anaheim/Los Angeles Angels, Texas Rangers and Baltimore Orioles, while winning the 2004 American MVP Award and eight Silver Slugger trophies. Guerrero posted a .318 average with 449 home runs and 1,496 RBIs in 2147 games, which includes 2,590 hits, 1,328 runs scored, 181 stolen bases, and 4,506 total bases.[97]
  • September 15 - Wladimir Balentien of the Yakult Swallows breaks Sadaharu Oh's 49-year Nippon Professional Baseball record for most home runs in a season, hitting his 56th and 57th home runs in a 9-0 victory over the Hanshin Tigers. Oh had held the previous record of 55 in 1964 while playing for the Yomiuri Giants.[98]
  • September 19:
    • The Los Angeles Dodgers defeated the host Arizona Diamondbacks, 7–6, to capture the National League West Division title, while becoming the first team to claim a playoff berth in 2013. The Dodgers were in last place in the West through most of May and all of June, trailing by as many as 9 12 games, after they 30-42 start. Since then, the Dodgers posted a Major League best 58–23 and extended the margin over second place Arizona by 10 12 games. This will be the first appearance for the Dodgers in the postseason since 2009, when they lost the National League Championship Series to the Philadelphia Phillies, four games to one. They have not been to the World Series since winning it all in 1988.[99]
    • Boston Red Sox closer Koji Uehara ended his streak of 37 straight batters retired, as well as his 30 13 inning scoreless streak, when he allowed a Danny Valencia leadoff triple and Matt Wieters hit a sacrifice fly to score pinch runner Alexi Casilla, in the Baltimore Orioles victory over the Red Sox, 3–2, at Fenway Park. In the top of the sixth, Chris Davis launched his 51st home run of the season off Boston starter Ryan Dempster, a towering shot to center field that tied the game at 2. That set an Orioles season-record, surpassing Brady Anderson, who clubbed 50 homers in 1996.[100]
  • September 20:
  • September 21 - A. J. Burnett of the Pittsburgh Pirates struck out a season-high 12 in a 4–2 victory over the Cincinnati Reds, becoming the first right-handed pitcher in the 126-year history of the franchise to top 200 strikeouts in a season when he fanned Joey Votto in the sixth inning. The previous franchise record for a righty had been set by Mark Baldwin, who had 197 strikeouts in the 1891 season. In the modern era, Kris Benson recorded 184 in 2000, Bob Friend 183 in 1960, and Bert Blyleven 182 in 1978. Burnett also became the first Pittsburgh pitcher to post 200 whiffs since left-handed Óliver Pérez did it in 2004.[103]
  • September 22
  • September 23:
    • The Pittsburgh Pirates clinched their first playoff berth since 1992 when they beat the Chicago Cubs, 2–1, while the Washington Nationals were eliminated by the St. Louis Cardinals. The Cincinnati Reds also clinched at least a wild-card berth when they defeated the New York Mets 3–2 in 10 innings. The Pirates and Reds, both with a 90-67 record, now trail St. Louis by two games in the National League Central division with five games to go. As a result, the three clubs qualified for the playoffs and will at least be Wild Card game participants.[109]
    • Alex Rios of the Texas Rangers hit for the cycle in four at-bats in a 12–0 victory over the Houston Astros at Rangers Ballpark. Rios etched his name in the Texas record books by completing his first career cycle and became just the seventh player in franchise history to accomplish the feat. It was also the fourth cycle recorded in club history on four at-bats.[110]
  • September 24 - Against the Washington Nationals at Busch Stadium, rookie Michael Wacha of the St. Louis Cardinals has a no-hitter broken up with two out in the ninth. Ryan Zimmerman chops a ground ball that bounces over Wacha's glove to shortstop Pete Kozma, who bare-hands it but throws wide to first, pulling Matt Adams off the base. Trevor Rosenthal relieves Wacha after the hit and retires Jayson Werth on a ground ball for the final out in a 2-0 Cardinal victory. The last two Cardinal no-hitters had been pitched by rookies: Bud Smith in 2001 and José Jiménez in 1999. The no-hitter would have been the first in St. Louis since the second of Cardinal Bob Forsch's two no-hitters at Busch Memorial Stadium almost a full 30 years earlier, on September 26, 1983. With Yu Darvish and Yusmeiro Petit having perfect game bids broken up on April 2 and September 6 respectively, this is the first season in which three no-hit bids were broken up with two out in the ninth since 1990. It is also the first month since September 1988 in which two no-hitters were broken up with two out in the ninth, Toronto Blue Jay Dave Stieb having the bids broken up in consecutive starts, on the 24th and 30th.[111][112]
  • September 25:
    • The Detroit Tigers clinched their third consecutive American League Central Division with a 1–0 victory over the host Minnesota Twins. Max Scherzer scattered two hits and stroke out 10 batters over seven scoreless innings to improve his major league best record to 21–3, while Torii Hunter drove in the winning run with a single in the first inning. With this victory, Jim Leyland earned his 700th win as manager of the Tigers, becoming the third manager in Detroit history to reach at least 700 wins, joining Hall of Famers Sparky Anderson and Hugh Jennings.[113]
    • The New York Yankees failed to claim one of the 10 playoff berths, when they were mathematically eliminated before an 8–3 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays at Yankee Stadium. The Yankees were trailing 7–3 in the eight inning when they were out of competition, as the Cleveland Indians completed a 7–2 victory against the Chicago White Sox. Despite having the highest opening-day payroll at $230 million, the Yankees were hindered by age, an assortment of injuries, and subpar performances, failing to make the postseason for the first time since 2008 and for only the second time in 19 years.[114]
    • The helpless Houston Astros set a franchise record with 109 losses this season. And after their loss to the New York Yankees, 3–2, they set another franchise record for futility, losing their 13th consecutive game. The Astros have not won a game since a 9–7 victory over the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim on September 13. Two of these losses were in extra innings, and one came in a rain-shortened seven-inning game.[115]
    • Will Middlebrooks powered the attack with seven RBIs and two home runs, including a grand slam, as the Boston Red Sox crushed the Colorado Rockies, 15–5, in the final game of Colorado Rockies first baseman Todd Helton at Coors Field. The seven RBIs are a career high for Middlebrooks, while the slam was his second this season and third of his career. Helton, who announced his retirement two weeks before, is the longest-tenured and arguably greatest player in Colorado history. He went 2-for-3, including one homer, a double and three RBIs. At the time of his retirement, he leads the Rockies in several statistical categories after playing for them during 17 seasons.[116]
  • September 27: The government of Cuba announces that is lifting many of the restrictions placed on the ability of its athletes, including its baseball players, to sign contracts with teams abroad. Cuban baseball players will be allowed to sign with clubs in foreign countries as long as they also fulfill commitments to play domestically as well. While this represents a significant change in policy, it is unlikely to immediately impact player availability to Major League Baseball.[117]
  • September 28:
    • The Pittsburgh Pirates belted six home runs to beat the Cincinnati Reds, 8–3 at Great American Ball Park, and clinched home-field advantage in the wild-card playoff game. Neil Walker hit two of the Pirates homers, while Andrew McCutchen, Pedro Alvarez, Marlon Byrd and prospect Andrew Lambo each hit one a piece. It was the first time the Pirates had six homers in a game since August 22, 2007, at Coors Field. Pittsburgh will host the Reds in the Pirates' first playoff appearance in 21 years. Pittsburgh posted a 50-31 record at PNC Park, the third-best home record in the National League, and wanted to make that long-awaited playoff return at home.[118]
    • The St. Louis Cardinals clinched their first National League Central Division title in four seasons with a 7–0 victory over the visiting Chicago Cubs. With this victory, the Cardinals are assured of home-field advantage when the NL Division Series starts.[119]
    • Andy Pettitte closed out his 18-season career with a one more vintage performance, pitching his first complete game in more than seven years to lead the New York Yankees to a 2–1 win over the Houston Astros at Minute Maid Park. The left-handed Pettitte, 41, allowed one earned run on five hits and two walks while striking out five, to outduel Astros rookie starter Paul Clemens, who was making only his fifth start an carried a shutout into the sixth inning before a cut on his right hand became an issue. A three-time All-Star and a member of five Yankees World Champion teams, Pettitte posted a 256-153 record and a 3.86 ERA in 3,316 innings of work, ending his career without a losing season.[120]
  • September 29:
  • September 30:
    • Josh Donaldson of the Oakland Athletics and Hunter Pence of the San Francisco Giants were named Player of the Month in the American League and National League respectively. The third baseman earned his first such honor after batting .337 with eight doubles, five home runs and 16 RBIs in 25 games to help the Athletics win the AL West Division title. Donaldson had 11 multi-hit efforts, while his 17 extra-base hits ranked him seventh in the AL, ending the season with 56 multi-hit games, the third-most in Oakland history behind Mark Kotsay (57 in 2004) and Miguel Tejada (57 in 2002).[124] In 27 games, Pence batted .293 with a .393 on-base percentage and a MLB-leading .667 slugging percentage, also leading MLB with 32 RBIs while tying for the lead with 11 home runs. Pence, who started all 162 games this season, became the first Giants player to do so since Alvin Dark in 1954, when the season was 154 games long. The right fielder finished the season with his NL-leading 171st consecutive game overall, hitting a walk-off single to give San Francisco a 7–6 victory against the San Diego Padres at AT&T Park. After that, Pence was rewarded with a five-year, $90 million contract by the Giants.[125]
    • Ubaldo Jiménez of the Cleveland Indians and Kris Medlen of the Atlanta Braves earned Pitcher of the Month honors in the American League and National League apiece. Jiménez, who won his third distinction, posted a perfect 4-0 mark with a 1.09 ERA in six starts, striking out 51 and walking only seven in 41 13 innings of work. He finished first among AL hurlers in innings and strikeouts, second in ERA and ranked fourth in the league with 11.1 strikeouts per nine innings, while opposing batters hit only .230 against him. On the final day of the regular season, the Dominican pitcher tossed 6 23 shutout innings and a season-best 13 strikeouts against the Minnesota Twins to ensure the Indians a spot in the AL Wild Card Game.[126] Medlen, who previously claimed the honor in August and September 2012, went 4-0 in five starts to tie for the NL lead in wins and posted a league-best 1.00 ERA over 36 innings. He also tied for first with the Los Angeles Dodgers' Zack Greinke with a 0.92 WHIP and ranked sixth with a .197 opponents' batting average, while striking out 33 strikeouts against eight walks. Medlen finished the season with a 3.11 ERA and set career highs in innings (197), wins (15) and strikeouts (157), while helping the Braves finish off their first NL East title since 2005 and claim home-field advantage in the NL Division Series against the Dodgers.[127]
    • Wil Myers of the Tampa Bay Rays was voted American League Rookie of the Month. In September Myers hit a slash line (BA/OBP/SLG) of .317/.360/.558, including 13 doubles and four home runs in 27 games to help the Rays advance to the AL Wild Card tiebreaker against the Texas Rangers. The 22-year-old outfielder finished first among AL rookies in hits (33), runs (18), doubles, extra-base hits (17) and total bases (58), while tying for first in homers (13). He also ranked second in RBIs (53), average (.293), OBP (.354) and SLG (.478). He put together an eight-game hitting streak from September 11–18, during which he batted .387 with five doubles, two homers and seven RBIs, and notched his second career multi-homer game.[128] The National League Rookie of the Month award was presented to Gerrit Cole, whose strong finish helped the Pittsburgh Pirates up their first playoff berth since the 1992 season. The 23-year-old pitcher went 4-0 in five September starts to tie for the league lead in wins, and also led qualifying rookie pitchers with a 1.69 ERA, 39 strikeouts and 32 innings, while issuing only 10 walks and finishing second with a .212 opponents' batting average. Cole finished his rookie season with a 10-7 record, 100 strikeouts, and a 3.22 ERA in 117 13 innings of work.[129]
    • David Price pitched a seven-hit complete-game and Evan Longoria contributed with three hits and two RBIs, including one home run and a double, leading the Tampa Bay Rays to a 5–2 win over the Texas Rangers, in the American League tiebreaker game at Rangers Ballpark. With the victory, Tampa Bay secured the second wild card spot and will visit the Cleveland Indians in order to meet the Boston Red Sox in the American League Division Series.[130]

October[edit]

  • October   1 - The Pittsburgh Pirates defeated Johnny Cueto and the Cincinnati Reds at PNC Park, 6–2, advancing to the playoffs for the first time in 21 years. Marlon Byrd, acquired by Pittsburgh in late August from the New York Mets, hit a home run in his first postseason at-bat of his 12-year career to put his team ahead, 1–0, in the second inning. Russell Martin homered twice and Francisco Liriano scattered four hits in seven innings, while Andrew McCutchen had two hits and reached base four times.[131]
  • October   2 - Alex Cobb pitched 6 23 scoreless innings in his first career postseason start, and the Tampa Bay Rays moved on to the American League Division Series after beating the Cleveland Indians, 4–0, at Progressive Field. Over the course of four days, Tampa Bay had to win three consecutive games on the road at Toronto, Texas and Cleveland in order to avoid playoff elimination. Delmon Young hit his ninth postseason home run and Desmond Jennings added a two-run RBI double, while three relievers combined for 2 13 innings to complete the second shutout in Tampa Bay franchise history. The Rays' other shutout was in Game 1 of the 2011 American League Division Series against the Texas Rangers.[132]
  • October   7 - The Los Angeles Dodgers took a 4–3 victory over the Atlanta Braves in Game 4 of the National League Division Series, that sent the Dodgers into the National League Championship Series for the first time since 2009.[133]
  • October   8 - The Boston Red Sox defeated the Tampa Bay Rays 3–1 in Game 4 of the American League Division Series, to advance to the American League Championship Series for the first time in five years.[134]
  • October   9 - The St. Louis Cardinals overcame the Pittsburgh Pirates in Game 5 of the National League Division Series, 6–1, and went back to the National League Championship Series for the third straight year.[135]
  • October 10 - The Detroit Tigers took charge of the Oakland Athletics in Game 5 of the American League Division Series, 3–0, advancing to the American League Championship Series for the third consecutive season.[136]
  • October 13 - Down 5-1 late in the game, David Ortiz hit a game tying grand-slam which was followed up by a walk-off win for the Boston Red Sox in the bottom of the 9th to tie the ALCS 1-1. [137]
  • October 18 - The St. Louis Cardinals scored four times in the third and added five more times in a disastrous fifth inning, en route to a 9–0 annihilation of the Los Angeles Dodgers and their ace Clayton Kershaw in Game 6 of the National League Championship Series. The Cardinals, who fell one win shy a year ago, advanced to the World Series for the second time in three years and the fourth time in the past decade. Michael Wacha (22), in his 12th big league start, beat Kershaw for the second time the series, allowing just two hits in seven scoreless innings and winning Most Valuable Player honors. Setup man Carlos Martínez (22) pitched a 1-2-3 eighth inning, while closer Trevor Rosenthal (23) retired the side in order in the ninth. All three Cardinals pitchers were rookies.[138]
  • October 19 - The Boston Red Sox took a definitive 5–2 lead over the Detroit Tigers in the bottom of the seventh inning on a Shane Victorino grand slam, to win Game 6 of the American League Championship Series and advance to the World Series for the third time in the last 10 years. Koji Uehara, who inherited the closer job after the team's first two choices were injured, delivered the last three outs and was named Most Valuable Player after posting three saves and a win in the series.[139]
  • October 29 - Cuban defector José Abreu agreed to a six-year, $68 million contract to play for the Chicago White Sox. It is the largest deal ever handed out by an international free agent in Major League history, besting the six-year, $60 million contract the Texas Rangers gave Yu Darvish on January 20, 2012.[140]
  • World Series
Main article: 2013 World Series
  • October 30 - The Boston Red Sox defeated the St. Louis Cardinals 6–1 at Fenway Park and won their eighth World Series title and third in the last 10 seasons, to become the first team to win three world championship titles in the 21st century. Red Sox icon David Ortiz earned MVP honors. Ortiz becomes the first player since Baltimore Orioles pitcher Jim Palmer did it in the 1983 World Series to have three World Series rings with the same team and to have never played for the Yankees in his career. The last time Boston clinched the World Series at Fenway Park was in 1918, a 2–1 victory over the Chicago Cubs in Game 6. The Red Sox also joined the 1991 Minnesota Twins as the only teams to win a World Series following a last-place finish in the previous season.[141]

November[edit]

  • November 3 - The Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles clinched the first Japan Series championship title in their nine-year history, blanking the defending champion Yomiuri Giants, 3–0, in a decisive Game 7. The Giants are the oldest and most successful team in Japanese baseball with 22 championships, as the Eagles won the title in their first trip to the championship series, providing a dramatic lift to an area still recovering from the devastating earthquake and tsunami in March 2011.[142]
  • November 13 - Max Scherzer of the Detroit Tigers and Clayton Kershaw of the Los Angeles Dodgers are named Cy Young Award winners of the American and National League respectively. Scherzer, Major League Baseball's only 20-game winner at 21-3, receives 28 of 30 first-place votes. Yu Darvish of the Texas Rangers finishes second, the highest finish by a Japanese-born pitcher; the previous high had been fourth, by Hideo Nomo (National League) in 1995 and 1996 and Daisuke Matsuzaka (American League) in 2008. Kershaw, who also won the National League Cy Young Award in 2011 and finished second to R. A. Dickey in 2012, receives 29 of 30 first place votes, with Adam Wainwright of the St. Louis Cardinals receiving the final first-place vote.[143]
  • November 14 - Major League Baseball took the first vote in a two-step process, unanimously approving funding for expanded instant replay in the 2014 MLB season. They plan to approve the new rules when they meet on January 16 in Paradise Valley, Arizona, after agreements with the unions for umpires and players. The instant replay was first used by the NFL in 1986, the NHL in 1991, the NBA in 2002 and Wimbledon in 2006. Even the Little League World Series put replay in place for 2008. MLB allowed it starting August 2008 but in a limited manner, only to determine whether potential home runs were fair or cleared fences.[144]

December[edit]

  • December 4 - Joe Garagiola is named as the 2014 recipient of the Buck O'Neil Lifetime Achievement Award, presented every three years by the Hall of Fame "for extraordinary efforts to enhance baseball’s positive impact on society". He will receive the award on July 26, 2014 at the Hall of Fame Awards Presentation, the day before induction ceremonies. Garagiola, a former player and broadcaster who received the Hall's Ford C. Frick Award in 1991, was specifically cited for his role as a founder of two organizations—the Baseball Assistance Team, a charity which aids needy members of the professional baseball community, and the National Spit Tobacco Education Program, which advocates against the use of smokeless tobacco.[145]
  • December 9 - Managers Joe Torre, Tony La Russa and Bobby Cox are elected to the Hall of Fame, and will be inducted on July 27, 2014. The three managers, who won a combined 7,558 wins and eight World Series, are all unanimously selected by the 16 voters on the Expansion Era Committee. Torre won 2,326 games and four World Series (1996, 1998, 1999 and 2000) with the New York Yankees; La Russa won 2,728 games and three World Series, in 1989 with the Oakland Athletics and in 2006 and 2011 with the St. Louis Cardinals; Cox won 2,504 games and led the Atlanta Braves to 14 consecutive division titles and the 1995 World Series title.[146]
  • December 10 - Roger Angell, senior editor for The New Yorker, is announced as the 2014 recipient of the J. G. Taylor Spink Award, awarded by the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) "for meritorious contributions to baseball writing." He will also receive his award at the Awards Presentation. Angell, who has written on the sport for more than 50 years, has published multiple best-selling books that included many of his New Yorker pieces. He is also the first recipient of the Spink Award to have never been a BBWAA member.[147]
  • December 11 - Eric Nadel, radio announcer for the Texas Rangers since 1979. is named as the 2014 recipient of the Ford C. Frick Award, presented by the Hall of Fame for broadcasting excellence. He will also receive his award at the Awards Presentation.[148]
  • December 15 - Researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine determine that Ryan Freel, at the time of his death, had stage two chronic traumatic encephalopathy; a progressive degenerative disease better known as CTE. Freel was found dead at his Jacksonville, Florida home as a result of a self-inflicted gunshot wound on December 22, 2012. He is reported as the first Major League Baseball player diagnosed with CTE.
  • December 16 – Major League Baseball and Nippon Professional Baseball announce major changes to the posting system under which NPB teams can offer players currently under contract and not yet eligible for free agency to MLB teams. The most significant changes are:[149]
    • Instead of posting fees set by a blind bidding process among MLB teams, fees will be set by NPB teams, with a cap of $20 million.
    • Once posted, a player can negotiate with any MLB team willing to pay the fee during a 30-day window. Previously, a player could only negotiate with the team that submitted the highest posting fee. As in the previous scheme, the fee is paid only if an MLB team ultimately signs the player.
  • December 22 - Alex Cabrera of the Tiburones de La Guaira blasted a historic home run in the Venezuelan League, breaking the league's 33-year-old record for the most home runs in a season set by Leones del Caracas' catcher Bo Díaz. Cabrera hit his 21st homer of the season in his 57th game, a grand slam off pitcher Daryl Thompson, in a 4–3 victory over the Caribes de Anzoátegui. With four games left on La Guaira's regular-season schedule, Cabrera is on pace to become the first Triple Crown winner in the 67-year history of the league. At this point, he is leading the circuit in homers with a .396 batting average and 58 RBI.[150]

Deaths[edit]

January[edit]

  • January   1 – Satchel Davis, 94, Negro league pitcher who played in the 1940s for the Baltimore Elite Giants and Cleveland Buckeyes, also a World War II veteran.
  • January   2 – Lee Eilbracht, 88, baseball coach at University of Illinois and a Chicago Cubs minor league player, who won four Big Ten titles during his coaching career, served as an analyst on baseball broadcasts, and was hired as an adviser for the 1992 film A League of Their Own.
  • January   5 – Joe Padilla, 48, National League umpire during the 1995 season.
  • January   6 – Cho Sung-min, 39, South Korean All-Star pitcher for the Japan's Yomiuri Giants.
  • January   7 – Jim Cosman, 69, pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs in parts of three seasons between 1966 and 1970.
  • January 11 – Fred Talbot, 71, pitcher who played from 1963 through 1970 for the Chicago White Sox, Philadelphia Athletics, New York Yankees and Seattle Pilots.
  • January 12 – Bubba Harris, 86, pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Athletics and Cleveland Indians in part of three seasons spanning 1948–1951.
  • January 13 – Enzo Hernández, 63, Venezuelan shortstop who played from 1971 through 1978 for the San Diego Padres and Los Angeles Dodgers.
  • January 15 – Bill Glynn, 87, first baseman who played for the Philadelphia Phillies and Cleveland Indians in part of five seasons spanning 1949–54.
  • January 19 – Milt Bolling, 82, shortstop who spent seven seasons in the majors from 1952 to 1958, and afterwards worked for the Boston Red Sox organization during 30 years.
  • January 19 – Stan Musial, 92, one of the best hitters in Major League history and a Hall of Fame outfielder/first baseman, who spent a 22-year career with the St. Louis Cardinals spanning 1941–1963, taking seven National League batting titles and three MVP awards, while helping the Cardinals capture four NL Pennants and three World Series titles in the 1940 decade.
  • January 19 – Earl Weaver, 82, Hall of Fame manager who won 1,480 games as Baltimore Orioles skipper, while leading the team to the World Series four times over 17 seasons, winning the Series championship title in 1970.
  • January 20 – Ron Fraser, 79, College Baseball Hall of Fame coach, who posted a 1,271–438–9 record for the Miami Hurricanes from 1963 through 1992, including two CWS tiles in 1982 and 1985.
  • January 23 – Ed Bouchee, 79, first baseman who played with the Philadelphia Phillies from 1956–1960 and the Chicago Cubs in 1960 and 1961 before joining the New York Mets in 1962.
  • January 24 – Harry Taylor, 77, relief pitcher for the 1957 Kansas City Athletics.
  • January 27 – Chuck Hinton, 78, All-Star outfielder who played between 1961 and 1968 for the Washington Senators, Cleveland Indians and California Angels.
  • January 27 – Barney Mussill, 93, relief pitcher for the 1944 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • January 28 – Lonnie Goldstein, 94, first baseman who played with the Cincinnati Reds in parts of the 1943 and 1946 seasons.
  • January 28 – Earl Williams, 64, 1971 National League Rookie of the Year, and catcher from 1970 to 1977 for the Atlanta Braves, Baltimore Orioles, Montreal Expos and Oakland Athletics.
  • January 30 – George Witt, 79, pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Los Angeles Angels and Houston Colt .45's from 1957–1962.
  • January 31 – Tony Pierce, 67, pitcher for the Kansas City/Oakland Athletics in 1967 and 1968.
  • January 31 – Fred Whitfield, 75, first baseman who played from 1962 through 1970 for the St. Louis Cardinals, Cleveland Indians, Cincinnati Reds and Montreal Expos.

February[edit]

  • February   2 – Lavonne Paire Davis, 88, All-Star catcher who set several batting and fielding records during her 11-year career in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, as well as an inspiration for the central character in the 1992 film A League of Their Own.
  • February   2 – Edith Houghton, 100, former baseball prodigy and first female scout in Major League history.
  • February   3 – Steve Demeter, 78, infielder for the 1959 Detroit Tigers and the 1960 Cleveland Indians, who also was an eight-time minor league All-Star, managed a first-place team in the Carolina League, coached in the majors, and gained induction in the International League Hall of Fame.
  • February   5 – Shelby Whitfield, 77, sports director for Associated Press Radio and ABC Radio, and play-by-play announcer for the Washington Senators from 1969 to 1970.
  • February 10 – Jake Thies, 86, pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates during the 1954–1955 seasons.
  • February 17 – Sophie Kurys, 87, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League MVP and four-time All-Star, a speedy infielder who set several all-time records, including 1,114 career stolen bases and five steals in a single game.
  • February 22 – Mario Ramírez, 55, Puerto Rican infielder who played with the New York Mets and San Diego Padres from 1980–1985.
  • February 26 – Mickey Stubblefield, 86, Negro League pitcher who in 1952 became the first African American to play in the Kentucky-Illinois-Tennessee League, being later drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates after integration.
  • February 28 – Pompeyo Davalillo, 84, Venezuelan infielder for the 1953 Washington Senators.
  • February 28 – Moon Mullen, 96, second baseman who played for the Philadelphia Blue Jays during the 1944 season.

March[edit]

  • March   2 – Tom Borland, 80, pitcher for the Boston Red Sox from 1960–1961, who also was named the CWS Most Outstanding Player in 1955 while pitching for Oklahoma A&M.
  • March   7 – Ray Martin, 87, pitcher for the Boston Braves in parts of three seasons spanning 1943–1948.
  • March   7 – Jake Striker, 79, pitcher who played from 1959 to 1960 with the Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox.
  • March   7 – Carl Thomas, 80, pitcher for the 1960 Cleveland Indians.
  • March 13 – Ducky Detweiler, 94, third baseman who played for the Boston Braves in the 1942 and 1946 seasons.
  • March 14 – Jack Curran, 82, two-sport coach and member of nine different Halls of Fame, who won more basketball and baseball games (2,491) than any high school coach in United States history.
  • March 16 – Yadier Pedroso, 26, pitcher for the Cuban national baseball team, who played in the 2006 and 2013 World Baseball Classic editions.
  • March 18 – Earl Hersh, 80, reserve outfielder for the 1956 Milwaukee Braves.
  • March 21 – Joe B. Scott, 92, Negro League outfielder who played from 1938 to 1956 for the New York Black Yankees, Pittsburgh Crawfords, Chicago American Giants and Memphis Red Sox.
  • March 23 – Virgil Trucks, 95, two-time All-Star pitcher who helped the Detroit Tigres clinch the 1945 World Series title, and one of five pitchers to throw two no-hitters in a major league season.
  • March 25 – Lou Sleater, 86, left-handed knuckleballer for six teams between 1950 and 1958, and also one of 10 pitchers to hit a walk-off home run since 1957.[151]
  • March 28 – Gus Triandos, 82, four-time All-Star catcher who played from 1953 through 1965 for five different teams, most prominently with the Baltimore Orioles.
  • March 30 – Bob Turley, 82, three-time All-Star and Cy Young Award winning pitcher, who lifted the New York Yankees, trailed 3 games to 1, to a come-from-behind victory over the Milwaukee Braves in the 1958 World Series.

April[edit]

  • April   1 – Bob Smith, 82, pitcher for the Red Sox, Cardinals, Pirates and Tigers in part of four seasons spanning 1955–1959.
  • April 11 – Grady Hatton, 90, third baseman for six teams in 12 seasons from 1946–1960, and later a manager for the Houston Astros from 1966 to 1968.
  • April 16 – Jack Daniels, 85, right fielder for the 1952 Boston Braves.
  • April 25 – Rick Camp, 59, relief pitcher for the Atlanta Braves during nine seasons between 1976 and 1985.
  • April 27 – Brad Lesley, 54, relief pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds and Milwaukee Brewers from 1982–1985, who in 1986 became the first American closer to pitch in Japan when he signed with the Hankyu Braves.

May[edit]

  • May   3 – Joe Astroth, 90, backup catcher for the Philadelphia/Kansas City Athletics in a span of 10 seasons between 1945 and 1956, who also served during the World War II conflict.
  • May 11 – Mike Davison, 67, pitcher for the San Francisco Giants in the 1969 and 1970 seasons.
  • May 11 – Lenny Yochim, 84, screwball pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1951 and 1954, who in 1955 became the first pitcher to throw a no-hitter in the Venezuelan Professional Baseball League while pitching for the Leones del Caracas club, a 3–0 shutout against Ramón Monzant and the Navegantes del Magallanes.
  • May 15 – Fred White, 76, Kansas City Royals broadcaster over 25 years, who helped call six division championships, an American League pennant in 1980 and the Royals' only World Series championship in 1985.
  • May 16 – Frankie Librán, 65, Puerto Rican infielder who played briefly with the San Diego Padres during the 1969 season, who also excelled in Puerto Rican baseball, basketball, volleyball, track and field, and softball.[152]
  • May 18 – Neil Chrisley, 81, outfielder who played from 1957 to 1961 with the Washington Senators, Detroit Tigers and Milwaukee Braves.
  • May 21 – Cot Deal, 90, pitcher for the Red Sox and Cardinals in part of four seasons spanning 1947–1954, who spent 48 years in baseball as a player (20), manager (5), coach (22) and executive (1).
  • May 23 – Epy Guerrero, 71, Dominican MLB scout who worked for the Astros, Yankees, Blue Jays and Brewers organizations.
  • May 23 – Luis Zuloaga, 90, legendary Venezuelan professional pitcher, who played in winter baseball, the Caribbean Series, and led the Venezuelan national team to win gold medal in two Baseball World Cup tournaments.
  • May 24 – John Miles, 90, legendary Negro League slugger inducted into a number of Hall of Fames, who gained notoriety by hitting 11 home runs in an 11-game span.
  • May 25 – Lewis Yocum, 65, orthopedic surgeon who achieved prestige by extending the careers of several Major League Baseball players.
  • May 26 – Larry Johnson, 62, backup catcher who played with the Cleveland Indians, Montreal Expos and Chicago White Sox in parts of five seasons between 1972 and 1978.
  • May 31 – Richie Phillips, 73, general counsel and executive director of the Major League Umpires Association from 1978 to 2000.

June[edit]

  • June 10 – Pete Vonachen, 87, longtime owner of the Peoria Chiefs minor league club.
  • June 11 – Billy Williams, 80, outfielder for the 1969 Seattle Pilots expansion team.
  • June 15 – Stan Lopata, 87, All-Star catcher for the Philadelphia Phillies, who holds single-season records for the most triples (7) and home runs (32) by a Phillies catcher, which he set in 1956.
  • June 16 – Peggy Fenton, 85, infield/outfield utility who played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League during the 1948 season.
  • June 18 – Gene Freese, 79, third baseman for six different teams during 12 seasons, who posted career numbers with 26 home runs and 87 RBIs in 1961, to help the Cincinnati Reds win their first National League pennant since 1940.
  • June 19 – Danny Kravitz, 82, backup catcher who played from 1956 through 1960 for the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Kansas City Athletics.
  • June 26 – Justin Miller, 35, pitcher who played with the Blue Jays, Marlins, Giants and Dodgers from 2002–2010, and for the NPB Chiba Lotte Marines in 2006.
  • June 29 – José Sosa, 60, reliever for the Houston Astros from 1975–1976, who in 1975 became the first Dominican pitcher to hit a home run in his first major league at-bat.[153]

July[edit]

  • July   8 – Dick Gray, 81, third baseman for the Los Angeles Dodgers and St. Louis Cardinals from 1958 to 1960, who became the first Dodgers player to hit a home run after the club moved to Los Angeles for the 1958 season.
  • July 14 – Matt Batts, 91, defensive specialist catcher who played from 1947 through 1956 for the Boston Red Sox, Detroit Tigers, St. Louis Browns, Chicago White Sox and Cincinnati Redlegs.
  • July 16 – Marv Rotblatt, 85, pitcher for the Chicago White Sox in parts of three seasons spanning 1948–1951, who was also the inspiration for Carleton College's annual 100-inning, one-day, nine-hour marathon softball game they christened Rotblatt in the spring of 1967.[154]
  • July 26 – Bob Savage, 91, pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and St. Louis Browns in part of five seasons spanning 1942–1949.
  • July 28 – Frank Castillo, 44, pitcher who spent seven seasons with the Chicago Cubs, and a member of the 2004 Boston Red Sox World Series Champions.
  • July 28 – Drungo Hazewood, 53, backup outfielder who played briefly for the 1980 Baltimore Orioles.
  • July 28 – George Scott, 69, a three-time All-Star first baseman and eight-time Gold Glove winner who played from 1966 through 1979 with four teams, most prominently for the Boston Red Sox, whose career included an American League leading 36 home runs and 109 RBIs during the 1975 season.

August[edit]

  • August   1 – Babe Martin, 93, backup outfielder/catcher for the St. Louis Browns and Boston Red Sox in a span of six seasons between 1944 and 1953.
  • August   6 – Mava Lee Thomas, 83, infielder/catcher who played for the Fort Wayne Daisies of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.
  • August   9 – Harry Elliott, 89, backup outfielder for the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1953 and 1955 seasons.
  • August   9 – Glen Hobbie, 77, pitcher for the Chicago Cubs from 1957-1964 and for the St. Louis Cardinals in 1964.
  • August   9 – Johnny Logan, 86, four-time National League All-Star for the 1957 World Series Champion Milwaukee Braves, who also led the league in doubles in 1955 and helped they win the NL pennant in 1958.
  • August 17 – Rod Craig, 55, backup outfielder who played with the Seattle Mariners, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox in parts of four seasons spanning 1979–1986.
  • August 17 – Jack Harshman, 96, pitcher for four teams between 1952 and 1960, mainly for the Chicago White Sox from 1954–1957, who holds the White Sox's single-game record by striking out 16 Boston Red Sox in 1954; hurled a 1-0, 16-inning shutout against the Detroit Tigers in the same season, and threw a one-hit, 1-0 shutout over the Baltimore Orioles in 1956.
  • August 28 – Frank Pulli, 78, National League umpire from 1972 to 1999, who officiated in four World Series and two All-Star games, as well as 3,774 regular games along with other playoff series; also the first umpire in MLB history to use instant replay to reverse a home run call in 1999, while working on the field for Roberto Clemente’s 3,000th hit in 1972, and for Hank Aaron’s 715 record-breaking home run in 1974.

September[edit]

  • September   6 – Santiago Rosario, 74, Puerto Rican first baseman and corner outfielder who played for the Kansas City Athletics in the 1965 season.
  • September 13 – Dan Osinski, 79, middle relief pitcher for the Kansas City Athletics, Milwaukee Braves, Boston Red Sox, Chicago White Sox and Houston Astros in parts of eight seasons spanning 1962–1970.
  • September 19 – Hiroshi Yamauchi, 85, Japanese businessman and majority owner of the Seattle Mariners since 1992.
  • September 20 – Walt Linden, 89,
  • September 25 – Bill Stewart, 85,
  • September 26 – Denis Brodeur, 82, iconic Canadian sports photographer and baseball author.
  • September 27 – Gates Brown, 74, outfielder for the Detroit Tigers in 13 seasons from 1963 through 1975, who hit a home run in his first MLB at bat and also was part of two World Series championships, winning as a player in 1968 and a coach in 1984.

October[edit]

  • October   1 – Ellis Burton, 77, center fielder who played with the St. Louis Cardinals, Cleveland Indians and Chicago Cubs in parts of five seasons spanning 1958–1965.
  • October   3 – Bob Chance, 73, first baseman who played from 1963 to 1969 with the Cleveland Indians, Washington Senators and California Angels.
  • October   8 – Andy Pafko, 92, five-time All-Star center fielder who posted a .285 average with 213 home runs and 976 RBIs in 17 seasons for the Chicago Cubs, Brooklyn Dodgers and Milwaukee Braves, while also appearing in 24 World Series games, including the Cubs' last visit to the Series in 1945.
  • October 13 – Mario Picone, 87, pitcher for the New York Giants and Cincinnati Redlegs in part of three seasons spanning 1947–1954.
  • October 14 – Wally Bell, 48, veteran umpire during 21 Major League Baseball seasons who worked the 2006 World Series, three All-Star Games, four league championship series, and seven division series, as well as the first active MLB umpire to die since John McSherry died on the field on Opening Day in 1996.
  • October 15 – Rudy Minarcin, 83, pitcher who appeared in 70 games from 1955 to 1957 for the Cincinnati Redlegs and Boston Red Sox, previously a two-sport star at Vandergrift High School, and also a Korean War veteran.
  • October 22 – Mark Small, 45, relief pitcher for the Houston Astros during the 1996 season.
  • October 27 – Eddie Erautt, 89, pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Cardinals in a span of six seasons from 1947 to 1953.
  • October 28 – Tetsuharu Kawakami, 93, Japanese player who won five batting titles, two home run crowns, three RBI titles and had six titles for the most hits in a season, while leading the Yomiuri Giants to nine consecutive championships from 1965 to 1973 as a manager.
  • October 30 – Bill Currie, 84, relief pitcher for the 1955 Washington Senators.
  • October 31 – Johnny Kucks, 80, pitcher for the New York Yankees and Kansas City Athletics from 1955 to 1960, who hurled a three-hit shutout in a 9–0 Yankees victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in Game 7 of the 1956 World Series, in the last World Series game ever played at Ebbets Field.

November[edit]

  • November  2 – Russ Sullivan, 90, outfielder for the Detroit Tigers from 1951 to 1953, whose mammoth home run into the third deck of Briggs Stadium’s right field pavilion in 1952, helped Detroit pitcher Hal Newhouser win his 200th career game.
  • November  6 – Ace Parker, 101, shortstop who played for the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1937 season, at the time of his death, the second oldest surviving Major League player.
  • November  8 – Rod Miller, 73, pinch-hitter for the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1957 season.
  • November 17 – Zeke Bella, 83, backup outfielder who played for the New York Yankees in 1957 and the Kansas City Athletics in 1959.
  • November 19 – Babe Birrer, 85, pitcher for the Detroit Tigers, Baltimore Orioles and Los Angeles Dodgers in a span of three seasons from 1955–1958, who also had a distinguished 18-year career in the Minor leagues, Canadian baseball and the Caribbean winter leagues.
  • November 21 – Mike Palagyi, 96, relief pitcher for the 1939 Washington Senators.
  • November 21 – Michael Weiner, 51, executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association since 2009, who led the negotiations in 2011 for the current collective bargaining agreement, which runs through 2016.
  • November 21 – George Werley, 75, relief pitcher for the 1956 Baltimore Orioles.
  • November 23 – Al Forman, 85, National League umpire who worked in 778 games during a seven-year career, including the 1962 MLB All-Star Game.
  • November 24 – Charlie Bicknell, 85, pitcher who played from 1948 to 1949 for the Philadelphia Phillies.
  • November 25 – Lou Brissie, 89, a decorated World War II hero who overcame serious combat injuries to become an All-Star pitcher, while playing for the Philadelphia Athletics and the Cleveland Indians between the 1947 and 1953 seasons.

December[edit]

  • December 10 – Don Lund, 90, outfielder for the Brooklyn Dodgers, St. Louis Browns and Detroit Tigers between 1945 and 1954, and also a University of Michigan three-sport athlete and Hall of Honor inductee.
  • December 10 – Pete Naton, 82, backup catcher for the 1953 Pittsburgh Pirates.
  • December 12 – Jim Burton, 64, Boston Red Sox relief pitcher who posted a 1-2 record with a 2.75 ERA and one save in the 1975 and 1977 seasons, who is better known for being the losing pitcher in Game 7 of the 1975 World Series.
  • December 13 – Vivian Kellogg, 91, multi-sport athlete who played from 1944 through 1950 in the legendary All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.
  • December 22 – Ed Herrmann, 67, All-Star catcher who played for five different teams in 11 seasons spanning 1967–1978, most prominently with the Chicago White Sox.
  • December 22 – Bill Tremel, 84, relief pitcher who played from 1954 through 1956 for the Chicago Cubs.
  • December 25 – Mike Hegan, 71, first baseman and outfielder with the New York Yankees, Seattle Pilots, Milwaukee Brewers & Oakland Athletics, and later a longtime broadcaster with the Brewers & Cleveland Indians. He was the son of longtime Indians catcher Jim Hegan.
  • December 26 – Paul Blair, 69, All-Star and eight-time Gold Glove center fielder, who played for the Baltimore Orioles, New York Yankees and Cincinnati Reds in 17 seasons spanning 1964–1980, and also a member of four World Series champion teams.

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  86. ^ Espn.com – Phillies capitalize on errors, snap Dodgers' 10-game winning streak
  87. ^ Sports.Yahoo.com – Ichiro gets 4,000th hit between MLB and Japan
  88. ^ Sports.Yahoo.com – Snider's homer lifts Pirates past Brewers 4-3
  89. ^ MLB.com – Miggy is AL Player of the Month second time this year
  90. ^ Martin Prado of the Arizona Diamondbacks voted NL Player of the Month
  91. ^ MLB.com – Yankees Ivan Nova named the American League Pitcher of the Month
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  93. ^ MLB.com – Perez named AL Rookie of Month for August
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  96. ^ Sports.Yahoo.com – Chris Davis hits 50th home ron
  97. ^ Vlad Guerrero retires from baseball
  98. ^ Wladimir Balentien Breaks Sadaharu Oh's Single-Season Home Run Record In Japan
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  130. ^ Espn.com – Rays reach playoffs behind David Price's complete game
  131. ^ Russell Martin's 2 HRs lead Pirates past Reds; Cards next
  132. ^ MLB.com – Famous Rays deliver, topping Tribe in Wild Card
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  139. ^ Espn. com – Shane Victorino's grand slam sends Red Sox to World Series
  140. ^ Espn.com – White Sox officially sign Jose Abreu
  141. ^ Espn.com – Red Sox close out Cardinals in Game 6, clinch title at Fenway Park
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  144. ^ MLB.com – Owners approve funding for expanded replay
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External links[edit]