2014 Tour de France

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
2014 Tour de France
2014 UCI World Tour, race 18 of 29
Route of the 2014 Tour de France.png
Route of the 2014 Tour de France
Race details
Dates 5 July 2014 (2014-07-05) – 27 July 2014 (2014-07-27)
Stages 21
Distance 3,663.5 km (2,276 mi)
Palmares
2013
2015

The 2014 Tour de France is the 101st edition of the Tour de France. It started in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, on 5 July 2014, followed by a stage finish in London, before returning to France.[1][2][3]

Teams[edit]

All 18 teams in the UCI's Proteam category are entitled, and obliged, to enter the race. Four UCI Professional Continental teams have also been invited.[4]

†: Invited Pro-Continental teams

Before the start of the race, Chris Froome, Alberto Contador, Vincenzo Nibali and Alejandro Valverde were among the main favourites for overall victory.[5][6] Froome crashed out of the Tour on stage 5, and Contador followed on stage 10. German rider Jens Voigt is competing in his seventeenth and final Tour.[7]

Grand Départ[edit]

Countdown clock at Trinity Leeds

The Grand Départ team presentation took place on 3 July in Leeds at the First Direct Arena, after a ceremonial ride from the University of Leeds. The ceremony included performances from Embrace and Opera North.[8]

Route and stages[edit]

The first three stages were in England, starting in Leeds.[9][10] This is the fourth Tour de France to contain stages in England (after 1974, 1994 and 2007) and the only edition to contain more than two stages in England.

List of stages[11]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1 5 July Leeds – Harrogate (United Kingdom) 190.5 km (118 mi) Flat stage  Marcel Kittel (GER)
2 6 July York – Sheffield (United Kingdom) 201 km (125 mi) Medium-mountain stage  Vincenzo Nibali (ITA)
3 7 July Cambridge – London (United Kingdom) 155 km (96 mi) Flat stage  Marcel Kittel (GER)
4 8 July Le Touquet-Paris-Plage – Lille Metropole (Villeneuve-d'Ascq) 163.5 km (102 mi) Flat stage  Marcel Kittel (GER)
5 9 July Ypres (Belgium) – Arenberg Porte du Hainaut 155.5 km (97 mi) Flat stage with cobblestones[12]  Lars Boom (NED)
6 10 July Arras – Reims 194 km (121 mi) Flat stage  André Greipel (GER)
7 11 July Épernay – Nancy 234.5 km (146 mi) Flat stage  Matteo Trentin (ITA)
8 12 July Tomblaine – Gérardmer La Mauselaine 161 km (100 mi) Medium-mountain stage  Blel Kadri (FRA)
9 13 July Gérardmer – Mulhouse 170 km (106 mi) Medium-mountain stage  Tony Martin (GER)
10 14 July Mulhouse – La Planche des Belles Filles 161.5 km (100 mi) Mountain stage  Vincenzo Nibali (ITA)
15 July Rest day
11 16 July Besançon – Oyonnax 187.5 km (117 mi) Flat stage
12 17 July Bourg-en-Bresse – Saint-Étienne 185.5 km (115 mi) Medium-mountain stage
13 18 July Saint-Étienne – Chamrousse 197.5 km (123 mi) Mountain stage
14 19 July Grenoble – Risoul 177 km (110 mi) Mountain stage
15 20 July Tallard – Nîmes 222 km (138 mi) Flat stage
21 July Rest day
16 22 July Carcassonne – Bagnères-de-Luchon 237.5 km (148 mi) Mountain stage
17 23 July Saint-Gaudens – Saint-Lary-Soulan Pla d’Adet 124.5 km (77 mi) Mountain stage
18 24 July Pau – Hautacam 145.5 km (90 mi) Mountain stage
19 25 July Maubourguet Pays du Val d’Adour – Bergerac 208.5 km (130 mi) Flat stage
20 26 July Bergerac – Périgueux 54 km (34 mi) History.gif Individual time trial
21 27 July Évry – Paris 137.5 km (85 mi) Flat stage

Classification leadership[edit]

There are four main classifications contested in the 2014 Tour de France, with the most important being the general classification. The general classification is calculated by adding each cyclist's finishing times on each stage. The cyclist with the least accumulated time is the race leader, identified by the yellow jersey; the winner of this classification will be considered the winner of the Tour.[13] In 2014, there are no time bonuses given.

Additionally, there is a points classification, which awards a green jersey. In the points classification, cyclists get points for finishing among the best in a stage finish, or in intermediate sprints. The cyclist with the most points leads the classification, and is identified with a green jersey.[13]

There is also a mountains classification. The organisation categorises some climbs as either hors catégorie, first, second, third, or fourth-category; points for this classification are won by the first cyclists that reach the top of these climbs, with more points available for the higher-categorized climbs. The cyclist with the most points leads the classification, and is identified with a polka dot jersey.[13]

The fourth individual classification is the young rider classification, marked by the white jersey. This classification is calculated the same way as the general classification, but the classification is restricted to riders who were born on or after 1 January 1989.[13]

For the team classification, the times of the best three cyclists per team on each stage are added; the leading team is the team with the lowest total time. The riders in the team that lead this classification are identified with yellow numbers and helmets.

For the combativity award, a jury awards points after each stage to the cyclists they consider most combative. The cyclist with the most votes in all stages leads the classification.

Stage Winner General classification
Jersey yellow.svg
Points classification
Jersey green.svg
Mountains classification
Jersey polkadot.svg
Young rider classification
Jersey white.svg
Team classification
Jersey yellow number.svg
Combativity award
Jersey red number.svg
1 Marcel Kittel Marcel Kittel Marcel Kittel Jens Voigt Peter Sagan Team Sky Jens Voigt
2 Vincenzo Nibali Vincenzo Nibali Peter Sagan Cyril Lemoine Blel Kadri
3 Marcel Kittel Jan Bárta
4 Marcel Kittel Thomas Voeckler
5 Lars Boom Astana Pro Team Lieuwe Westra
6 André Greipel Luis Ángel Maté
7 Matteo Trentin Martin Elmiger
8 Blel Kadri Blel Kadri Michał Kwiatkowski Blel Kadri
9 Tony Martin Tony Gallopin Tony Martin Tony Martin
10 Vincenzo Nibali Vincenzo Nibali Joaquim Rodríguez Romain Bardet Ag2r-La Mondiale
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
Final
Notes
  • In stage 2, Bryan Coquard, who was third in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because Marcel Kittel (in first place) wore the yellow jersey as leader of the general classification and Peter Sagan (in second place) wore the white jersey as leader of the young riders' classification during that stage
  • In stages 3–5, Romain Bardet, who was second in the young riders' classification, wore the white jersey, because Peter Sagan (in first place) wore the green jersey as leader of the points classification. Also, in stages 6-7, Michał Kwiatkowski wore the white jersey for the same reason.

Classification standings[edit]

Legend
  Yellow jersey   Denotes the leader of the General classification   Polka dot jersey   Denotes the leader of the Mountains classification
  Green jersey   Denotes the leader of the Points classification   White jersey   Denotes the leader of the Young rider classification
  Jersey with a yellow background on the number bib.   Denotes the leader of the Team classification

Standings below as after the ninth stage

General classification[edit]

Rider Team Time
1  Tony Gallopin (FRA) Yellow jersey Lotto-Belisol 38h 04' 38"
2  Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Jersey yellow number.svg Astana + 1' 34"
3  Tiago Machado (POR) Team NetApp-Endura + 2' 40"
4  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Jersey yellow number.svg Astana + 3' 18"
5  Richie Porte (AUS) Team Sky + 3' 32"
6  Michał Kwiatkowski (POL) White jersey Omega Pharma-Quick Step + 4' 00"
7  Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 4' 01"
8  Pierre Rolland (FRA) Team Europcar + 4' 07"
9  Alberto Contador (ESP) Team Tinkoff-Saxo + 4' 08"
10  Romain Bardet (FRA) Ag2r-La Mondiale + 4' 13"

Points classification[edit]

Rider Team Points
1  Peter Sagan (SVK) Green jersey Cannondale 267
2  Bryan Coquard (FRA) Team Europcar 156
3  Marcel Kittel (GER) Giant-Shimano 146
4  Alexander Kristoff (NOR) Team Katusha 117
5  Mark Renshaw (AUS) Omega Pharma-Quick Step 101
6  André Greipel (GER) Lotto-Belisol 98
7  Greg Van Avermaet (BEL) BMC Racing Team 87
8  Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Jersey yellow number.svg Astana 75
9  Tony Gallopin (FRA) Yellow jersey Lotto-Belisol 71
10  Blel Kadri (FRA) Ag2r-La Mondiale 63

Mountains classification[edit]

Rider Team Points
1  Tony Martin (GER) Polka-dotted jerseyJersey red number.svg Omega Pharma-Quick Step 18
2  Blel Kadri (FRA) Ag2r-La Mondiale 17
3  Alessandro De Marchi (ITA) Cannondale 17
4  Nicolas Edet (FRA) Cofidis 12
5  Joaquim Rodríguez (ESP) Team Katusha 11
6  Thomas Voeckler (FRA) Team Europcar 8
7  Cyril Lemoine (FRA) Cofidis 6
8  Sylvain Chavanel (FRA) IAM Cycling 6
9  Simon Yates (GBR) Orica-GreenEDGE 5
10  Jens Voigt (GER) Trek Factory Racing 4

Young Riders classification[edit]

Rider Team Time
1  Michał Kwiatkowski (POL) White jersey Omega Pharma-Quick Step 38h 08' 38"
2  Romain Bardet (FRA) Ag2r-La Mondiale + 13"
3  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) FDJ.fr + 1' 06"
4  Tom Dumoulin (NED) Giant-Shimano + 4' 08"
5  Peter Sagan (SVK) Green jersey Cannondale + 16' 11"
6  Tom-Jelte Slagter (NED) Garmin-Sharp + 27' 54"
7  Jon Izagirre (ESP) Movistar Team + 41' 40"
8  Matteo Trentin (ITA) Omega Pharma-Quick Step + 42' 01"
9  Nelson Oliveira (POR) Lampre-Merida + 43' 13"
10  Simon Yates (GBR) Orica-GreenEDGE + 45' 01

Team classification[edit]

Pos. Team Time
1 Astana Jersey yellow number.svg 114h 22' 53″
2 Belkin Pro Cycling + 22"
3 Ag2r-La Mondiale + 53"
4 Team Sky + 5' 31"
5 Omega Pharma-Quick Step + 9' 31"
6 BMC Racing Team + 10' 45"
7 Team Tinkoff-Saxo + 15' 03"
8 Movistar Team + 20' 05"
9 Lampre-Merida + 20' 08"
10 Trek Factory Racing + 20' 11"

Women's race[edit]

Women will take part on the final day of the 2014 Tour de France in a race called La Course by Le Tour de France. The riders will finish on the Champs-Élysées a few hours before the men arrive. The race is part of the International Cycling Union's (UCI) 2014 elite women's calendar.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tour de France: Yorkshire to host start of 2014 race". BBC News. Retrieved 14 December 2012. 
  2. ^ "Yorkshire 2014 Grand Départ, London to host a stage — Tour de France 2013". 
  3. ^ "Tour de France 2014: Yorkshire, Olympic Park, Mall feature". BBC News. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  4. ^ "Teams Selection of Tour de France 2014". letour.com. 28 January 2014. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  5. ^ Rob Sturney (2014-05-07). "Chris Froome, Alberto Contador, Alejandro Valverde and Vincenzo Nibali will be clashing at the Tour de France in July". Cyclingmagazine.ca. Retrieved 2014-07-12. 
  6. ^ "Tour de France: The Contenders". .skysports.com. Retrieved 2014-07-12. 
  7. ^ Gregor Brown. "Jens Voigt to match Tour de France participation record". Cyclingweekly.co.uk. Retrieved 2014-07-12. 
  8. ^ "BBC News - Leeds Arena hosts Tour de France opening ceremony". Bbc.co.uk. 2014-07-03. Retrieved 2014-07-09. 
  9. ^ "Yorkshire to host the 2014 Tour de France". yorkshire.com. 14 December 2012. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  10. ^ "British Start To 2014 Tour De France Presented". Cyclingnews.com. 14 December 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  11. ^ "2014 Route". Le Tour. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  12. ^ Because of the cobblestones, the stage winner received only 30 points (as opposed to 45 for a regular flat stage) for the points classification.
  13. ^ a b c d Christian, Sarah (2 July 2009). "Tour de France demystified — Evaluating success". RoadCycling.co.nz Ltd. Retrieved 18 July 2013. 
  14. ^ "Tour de France to host one-day women's stage on the Champs-Elyseés". The Guardian. 1 February 2014. Retrieved 3 February 2014. 

External links[edit]