2014 Winter Olympics medal table

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Map showing the medal achievements of each country during the 2014 Winter Olympics
       countries that won at least one gold
       countries that won at least one silver
       countries that won at least one bronze
       countries that did not win any medals
       countries that did not participate
       countries without a recognised NOC

The 2014 Winter Olympics medal table is a list of National Olympic Committees (NOCs) ranked by the number of medals won during the 2014 Winter Olympics, which were held in Sochi, Russia, from 7 to 23 February. A total of 2,873 athletes (+241 from 2010 Olympics) representing 88 NOCs (+6 from 2010) participated in 98 events (+12 from 2010) in 15 sports and disciplines (unchanged from 2010).[1][2]

Host nation Russia topped the medal table with thirteen gold, eleven silver and nine bronze, the second Winter Olympics in a row (and the fourth overall) the host nation led the gold medal count (following Canada in 2010). Slovenia won its first Winter Olympic gold medal, with a historic tie in alpine skiing.[3]

Medal table[edit]

Medal winners from men's singles figure skating: (From left to right) Patrick Chan of Canada (silver), Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan (gold) and Denis Ten of Kazakhstan (bronze).

The medal table is based on information provided by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and is consistent with IOC convention in its published medal tables. By default, the table is ordered by the number of gold medals the athletes from a nation have won, where nation is an entity represented by a National Olympic Committee (NOC). The number of silver medals is taken into consideration next and then the number of bronze medals. If nations are still tied, equal ranking is given and they are listed alphabetically.

Two gold medals, one to Slovenia and one to Switzerland, were awarded for a first-place tie in the women's downhill competition in alpine skiing, the first gold medal tie ever for an Olympic alpine skiing event. No silver medal was awarded.[4] Two bronze medals, one to Canada and one to the United States, were awarded for the third-place tie in the men's super-G event in alpine skiing.[5]

Key

   *   Host nation (Russia)

Rank NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Russia (RUS)* 13 11 9 33
2  Norway (NOR) 11 5 10 26
3  Canada (CAN) 10 10 5 25
4  United States (USA) 9 7 12 28
5  Netherlands (NED) 8 7 9 24
6  Germany (GER) 8 6 5 19
7  Switzerland (SUI) 6 3 2 11
8  Belarus (BLR) 5 0 1 6
9  Austria (AUT) 4 8 5 17
10  France (FRA) 4 4 7 15
11  Poland (POL) 4 1 1 6
12  China (CHN) 3 4 2 9
13  South Korea (KOR) 3 3 2 8
14  Sweden (SWE) 2 7 6 15
15  Czech Republic (CZE) 2 4 2 8
16  Slovenia (SLO) 2 2 4 8
17  Japan (JPN) 1 4 3 8
18  Finland (FIN) 1 3 1 5
19  Great Britain (GBR) 1 1 2 4
20  Ukraine (UKR) 1 0 1 2
21  Slovakia (SVK) 1 0 0 1
22  Italy (ITA) 0 2 6 8
23  Latvia (LAT) 0 2 2 4
24  Australia (AUS) 0 2 1 3
25  Croatia (CRO) 0 1 0 1
26  Kazakhstan (KAZ) 0 0 1 1
Total (26 NOCs) 99 97 99 295

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Discover the twelve new winter sports events for Sochi 2014!". Olympic.org. 18 December 2013. Retrieved 4 February 2014. 
  2. ^ "Rogge announces three new disciplines for Sochi 2014". Russia Today. 5 July 2011. Retrieved 6 July 2011. 
  3. ^ Herman, Martyn (12 February 2014). "Maze amazes as she wins Slovenia's first gold". Reuters (Rosa Khutor, Russia). Retrieved 12 February 2014. 
  4. ^ Pennington, Bill (12 February 2014). "In Women's Downhill, a Nice Round Historic Tie". The New York Times. Retrieved 12 February 2014. 
  5. ^ Ng, Curtis (16 February 2014). "Jan Hudec bronze snaps Canadian alpine medal drought". cbc.ca. Retrieved 16 February 2014. 

External links[edit]