21st Legislative District (New Jersey)

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New Jersey's 21st Legislative district
Census Bureau map of New Jersey's 21st Legislative District.gif
New Jersey State Senator Thomas Kean, Jr. (R)
New Jersey General Assemblymembers Jon Bramnick (R)
Nancy Munoz (R)
Registration 28.3% Republican
25.4% Democratic
Demographics 85.5% White
2.8% Black/African American
0.1% Native American
8.0% Asian
0.0% Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
1.6% Other race
1.9% Two or more races
8.0% Hispanic
Population 219,875
Voting-age population 161,480
Registered voters 148,889

New Jersey's 21st Legislative District is one of 40 in the New Jersey Legislature. As of the 2011 apportionment, the district includes the Morris County communities of Chatham Borough and Long Hill Township; the Somerset County municipalities of Bernards Township, Far Hills Borough, Warren Township and Watchung Borough; the Union County municipalities of Berkeley Heights Township, Cranford Township, Garwood Borough, Kenilworth Borough, Mountainside Borough, New Providence Borough, Roselle Park Borough, Springfield Township, Summit City and Westfield Town.[1][2]

Demographic characteristics[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, the district had a population of 219,875, of whom 161,480 (73.4%) were of voting age. The racial makeup of the district was 188,028 (85.5%) White, 6,256 (2.8%) African American, 190 (0.1%) Native American, 17,640 (8.0%) Asian, 50 (0.0%) Pacific Islander, 3,477 (1.6%) from some other race, and 4,234 (1.9%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17,698 (8.0%) of the population.[3] The 21st District had 148,889 registered voters as of November 2013, of whom 68,769 (46.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated, 42,154 (28.3%) were registered as Republicans, 37,843 (25.4%) were registered as Democrats and 123 (0.1%) were registered to other parties.[4]

The densely populated district is one of the wealthiest in the state, with the highest equalized property value and income on a per capita basis. Standardized test schools in the district's public schools were the highest of all districts statewide, and the district placed third in the percentage of 9th graders graduating from high school. Voter registration and turnout is among the highest in the state, with registered Republicans outnumbering Democrats by a more than 3-2 margin.[5][6]

Apportionment history[edit]

The 2011 apportionment added Chatham Borough (from District 26), Bernards Township (from District 16), Far Hills Borough (from District 16) and Kenilworth Borough (from District 20). Removed were Chatham Township, Harding Township, Madison and Millburn. all of which were shifted into the 27th Legislative District.

Changes to the district made as part of the New Jersey Legislative redistricting in 2001, based on the results of the 2000 United States Census removed Kenilworth Borough and Union Township (both to the 20th Legislative District) Caldwell Township, Essex Fells Township, Livingston Township, North Caldwell Township and Roseland Borough (all to the 27th Legislative District), Cedar Grove Township and Verona Township (both to the 40th Legislative District) and added Berkeley Heights Township, Chatham Township, Cranford Township, Garwood Borough, Long Hill Township, Mountainside Borough, New Providence Borough, Warren Township, Watchung Borough and Westfield Town (from the 22nd Legislative District), Harding Township (from the 25th Legislative District) and Madison Borough (from the 26th Legislative District).[7]

Political representation[edit]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the district is represented in the State Senate by Thomas Kean, Jr. (R, Westfield) and in the General Assembly by Jon Bramnick (R, Westfield) and Nancy Munoz (R, Summit).[8][9]

Election history[edit]

After a single term in the Senate, Thomas G. Dunn was dropped by the Union County Democrats in 1977 and was replaced on the party line by Elizabeth Mayor John T. Gregorio.[10] Dunn ran as an independent and lost to Gregorio in the general election.[11]

Edward K. Gill, elected to the Assembly in 1981 after C. Louis Bassano ran for the Senate, had announced that he would not run for a third term in the Assembly shortly before his death in February 1985.[12] Peter J. Genova was elected in a special election to fill Gill's vacant seat.[13]

Joel Weingarten was elected to the Assembly in a November 1996 special election in which he defeated Democratic candidate Robert R. Peacock to fill the one year remaining on the vacant seat of Monroe Jay Lustbader, who had died in office in March 1996.[14]

A special convention of Republican Party delegates chose Nancy Munoz in May 2009 to succeed her husband, Eric Munoz, following his death in March of that year.[15]

Session State Senate[16] Assembly[17]
1976-1977 Thomas G. Dunn Thomas J. Deverin John T. Gregorio
1978-1979 John T. Gregorio Thomas J. Deverin Raymond Lesniak
1980-1981 C. Louis Bassano Raymond Lesniak
1982-1983 C. Louis Bassano Edward K. Gill Chuck Hardwick
1984-1985 C. Louis Bassano Edward K. Gill Chuck Hardwick
1986-1987 Peter J. Genova Chuck Hardwick
1988-1989 C. Louis Bassano Peter J. Genova Chuck Hardwick
1990-1991[18] Neil M. Cohen Chuck Hardwick
1992-1993 C. Louis Bassano Monroe Jay Lustbader Maureen Ogden
1994-1995[19] C. Louis Bassano Monroe Jay Lustbader Maureen Ogden
1996-1997 Monroe Jay Lustbader Kevin J. O'Toole
1998-1999[20] C. Louis Bassano Kevin J. O'Toole Joel M. Weingarten
2000-2001[21] Kevin J. O'Toole Joel M. Weingarten
2002-2003[22] Richard Bagger Thomas Kean, Jr. Eric Munoz
2004-2005[23] Thomas Kean, Jr. Jon Bramnick Eric Munoz
2006-2007 Jon Bramnick Eric Munoz
2008-2009 Thomas Kean, Jr. Jon Bramnick Eric Munoz
2010-2011[24] Jon Bramnick Nancy Munoz
2012-2013 Thomas Kean, Jr. Jon Bramnick Nancy Munoz
2014-2015[25] Thomas Kean, Jr. Jon Bramnick Nancy Munoz

References[edit]

  1. ^ Districts by Number, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  2. ^ Municipalities (sorted by 2011 legislative district), New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  3. ^ DP-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 from the 2010 Demographic Profile Data for the General Assembly District 21 (2010), New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  4. ^ Statewide Voter Registration Summary, New Jersey Department of State, November 28, 2013. Accessed February 1, 2014.
  5. ^ District 21 Profile, Rutgers University. Accessed July 15, 2010.
  6. ^ 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book. Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. p. 92. 
  7. ^ Legislative Districts, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of December 6, 1998. Accessed July 15, 2010.
  8. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  9. ^ District 21 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  10. ^ Edge, Wally. "Retro Quote of the Day", PolitickerNJ.com, June 12, 2007. Accessed July 17, 2010.
  11. ^ NJ Senate District 21 - History, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed July 17, 2010.
  12. ^ Staff. "DEATHS ELSEWHERE", The Philadelphia Inquirer, February 11, 1985. Accessed July 18, 2010.
  13. ^ Staff. "FIGHT FOR ASSEMBLY CONTROL TO FOCUS ON A FEW DISTRICTS", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 5, 1985. Accessed July 18, 2010. "Genova was elected earlier this year to the Assembly after the death of Assemblyman Edward Gill."
  14. ^ Pristin, Terry. "NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING -- LOCAL ELECTION RESULTS New Republican in Assembly", The New York Times, November 6, 1996. Accessed June 14, 2010.
  15. ^ Bechtel, Sheri. "Nancy Munoz succeeds her husband in the N.J. Assembly", The Star-Ledger, May 22, 2009. accessed July 18, 2010.
  16. ^ NJ Senate District 21 - History, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed July 16, 2010.
  17. ^ NJ Assembly 21 - History, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed July 16, 2010.
  18. ^ Staff. "Vote Totals for the Elections Held on Tuesday in New York and New Jersey", The New York Times, November 9, 1989. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  19. ^ Sullivan, Joseph F. "THE 1993 ELECTIONS: New Jersey Legislature; Cut Taxes 30 Percent? Whitman's Top Statehouse Allies Say Not So Fast", The New York Times, November 4, 1993. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  20. ^ Staff. "THE 1997 ELECTIONS: RESULTS; The Races for the New Jersey Assembly", The New York Times, November 5, 1997. Accessed July 12, 2010.
  21. ^ Kocieniewski, David. "THE 1999 ELECTIONS: NEW JERSEY ASSEMBLY; Democrats Win Seats in Three Districts, Narrowing Republicans' Majority", The New York Times, November 3, 1999. Accessed July 12, 2010.
  22. ^ Staff. "THE 2001 ELECTIONS; RESULTS -- The Races for New Jersey", The New York Times, November 8, 2001. Accessed July 12, 2010.
  23. ^ Kocieniewski, David. "THE 2003 ELECTION: THE STATEHOUSE; Democrats Seize Senate And Widen Assembly Gap", The New York Times, November 5, 2003. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  24. ^ Staff. "2009 Election Results", The New York Times, November 9, 2009. Accessed July 12, 2010.
  25. ^ Official List; Candidates for General Assembly For GENERAL ELECTION 11/05/2013 Election, New Jersey Department of State, December 4, 2013. Accessed February 2, 2014.