22.2 surround sound

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22.2 or Hamasaki 22.2 (named after Kimio Hamasaki, a senior research engineer at NHK Science & Technology Research Laboratories in Japan) is the surround sound component of Super Hi-Vision (a new television standard with 16 times the pixel resolution of HDTV). It has been developed by NHK Science & Technical Research Laboratories. It uses 24 speakers (including two subwoofers) arranged in three layers.[1]

Channels[edit]

Diagram of three major multichannel audio formats: 5.1, 9.2 and 22.2 channel layouts.

The channel numbers and labels are:[2]

AES

Pair No./Ch No.

Channel

No.

Label Name
1/1 1 FL Front left
1/2 2 FR Front right
2/1 3 FC Front center
2/2 4 LFE1 LFE-1
3/1 5 BL Back left
3/2 6 BR Back right
4/1 7 FLc Front left center
4/2 8 FRc Front right center
5/1 9 BC Back center
5/2 10 LFE2 LFE-2
6/1 11 SiL Side left
6/2 12 SiR Side right
7/1 13 TpFL Top front left
7/2 14 TpFR Top front right
8/1 15 TpFC Top front center
8/2 16 TpC Top center
9/1 17 TpBL Top back left
9/2 18 TpBR Top back right
10/1 19 TpSiL Top side left
10/2 20 TpSiR Top side right
11/1 21 TpBC Top back center
11/2 22 BtFC Bottom front center
12/1 23 BtFL Bottom front left
12/2 24 BtFR Bottom front right

Channel numbers up to 6 represent the same as those in a 5.1 channel system. There are then a further 5 listener-plane channels, 9 overhead channels, arranged in a square, and a row of 3 further channels at the bottom front, plus the additional LFE channel.

Demonstrations[edit]

Reviews[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "22.2 Multichannel Audio Format Standardization Activity". NHK World. Retrieved February 17, 2014. 
  2. ^ Ultra High Definition Television - Audio Characteristics And Audio Channel Mapping For Program Production. Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers. 2008. SMPTE ST 2036-2:2008. 
  3. ^ Sangani, Kris (2008-10-11). "A game of leapfrog". Engineering & Technology 3 (17): p.8. doi:10.1049/et:20081720. Retrieved 2008-10-31. 
  4. ^ Sweney, Mark (2011-08-28). "BBC plans to use 3D and 'super hi-vision' for London Olympics". The Guardian (London). 

External links[edit]