220 (number)

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219 220 221
Cardinal two hundred twenty
Ordinal 220th
(two hundred and twentieth)
Factorization 22× 5 × 11
Roman numeral CCXX
Binary 110111002
Ternary 220113
Quaternary 31304
Quinary 13405
Senary 10046
Octal 3348
Duodecimal 16412
Hexadecimal DC16
Vigesimal B020
Base 36 6436

220 (two hundred [and] twenty) is the natural number following 219 and preceding 221.

In mathematics[edit]

It is a composite number, with its divisors being 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 11, 20, 22, 44, 55 and 110, making it an amicable number with 284.[1][2] Every number up to 220 may be expressed as a sum of its divisors, making 220 a practical number.[3] Also, being divisible by the sum of its digits, 220 is a Harshad number.[4]

It is the sum of four consecutive primes (47 + 53 + 59 + 61).[5] It is the smallest even number with the property that when represented as a sum of two prime numbers (per Goldbach's conjecture) both of the primes must be greater than or equal to 23.[6] There are exactly 220 different ways of partitioning 64 = 82 into a sum of square numbers.[7]

It is a tetrahedral number, the sum of the first ten triangular numbers,[8] and a dodecahedral number.[9] If all of the diagonals of a regular decagon are drawn, the resulting figure will have exactly 220 regions.[10]

In other fields[edit]

The number 220 can also refer to:

221-229[edit]

221 has its own article.


222 has its own article.


223 has its own article.


224 has its own article.


225 has its own article.

See also: Area code 225 - North American telephone area code 225 encompasses a section of south Louisiana, including Baton Rouge. The area code has come to be part of the identity of the Baton Rouge area to the extent that there is a local news magazine named 225.


226 has its own article.

See also: Area code 226

227 has its own article.


228 has its own article. See also:


229 has its own article.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Bryan Bunch, The Kingdom of Infinite Number. New York: W. H. Freeman & Company (2000): 167
  2. ^ Higgins, Peter (2008). Number Story: From Counting to Cryptography. New York: Copernicus. p. 61. ISBN 978-1-84800-000-1. 
  3. ^ "Sloane's A005153 : Practical numbers", The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  4. ^ "Sloane's A005349 : Niven (or Harshad) numbers: numbers that are divisible by the sum of their digits", The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  5. ^ "Sloane's A034963 : Sums of four consecutive primes", The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  6. ^ "Sloane's A025018 : Numbers n such that least prime in Goldbach partition of n increases", The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  7. ^ "Sloane's A037444 : Number of partitions of n^2 into squares", The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  8. ^ "Sloane's A000292 : Tetrahedral (or triangular pyramidal) numbers", The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  9. ^ "Sloane's A006566 : Dodecahedral numbers", The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  10. ^ "Sloane's A007678 : Number of regions in regular n-gon with all diagonals drawn", The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.

References[edit]