Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Station, Philadelphia

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To be distinguished from 24th Street (PTC station).
24th St. Station or Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Station
B&OPassengerStationPhiladelphia.jpg
Main entrance from the Chestnut Street Bridge, 1959
Station statistics
Address 24th Street and Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
U.S.
Line(s) B&O Railroad
Other information
Opened 1888; 126 years ago (1888)[1]
Closed April 28, 1958; 56 years ago (1958-04-28)[1]
Services
  Former services  
Preceding station   Baltimore and Ohio   Following station
Philadelphia Branch Terminus

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Station, Philadelphia (also known as 24th St. Station) was the main passenger station for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Designed by architect Frank Furness, it stood at 24th Street and the Chestnut Street Bridge from 1888 to 1963.[2]

The station was essentially built on stilts, with the main entrance from the Chestnut Street Bridge, 30 feet above ground level. The B&O trains ran along the east bank of the Schuylkill River and under the bridge. Furness mixed Flemish Revival detailing with an industrial aesthetic of brick, iron and glass. Through the station's innovative plan, he separated the flow of passengers waiting to board the trains from those arriving.

It also had a connection to the 24th Street trolley stop until that was closed in 1956. The station saw its last regularly scheduled passenger train on April 28, 1958, when the Baltimore & Ohio railroad ended all passenger service north of Baltimore.

The station was demolished in 1963.

Philadelphia Model Railroad Club[edit]

The B&O Station building was also home to the Philadelphia Model Railroad Club, which split into two separate clubs when the building was torn down. The first reopened as the Cherry Valley Model Railroad Club in Merchantville, New Jersey in 1962,[3] and the second as the East Penn Traction Club several years later.[4] Some of the models and buildings from the PMRC were salvaged, and live on today on the CVMRR layout.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference kcet was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  2. ^ Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Station, Philadelphia at the Historic American Building Survey
  3. ^ Sam Steinruck, "Model Train Layout A Little Bit of Christmas", The Retrospective, December 5, 2008
  4. ^ The East Penn Traction Club: The Origin of Modular Trolley Layout
  5. ^ "Model Railroad Invites Inspection", The Haddon Gazette, November 2, 1967

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°57′07″N 75°10′49″W / 39.95194°N 75.18028°W / 39.95194; -75.18028