26th New Zealand Parliament

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The 26th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand. It was elected at the 1938 general election in October of that year.

1938 general election[edit]

The 1938 general election was held on Friday, 14 October in the Māori electorates and on Saturday, 15 October in the general electorates, respectively.[1] A total of 80 MPs were elected; 48 represented North Island electorates, 28 represented South Island electorates, and the remaining four represented Māori electorates.[2] 995,173 voters were enrolled and the official turnout at the election was 92.9%.[1]

Sessions[edit]

The 26th Parliament sat for an unprecedented 19 sessions, and was prorogued on 30 August 1943.[3]

Session Opened Adjouned
first 27 June 1939 6 October 1939
second 30 May 1940 31 July 1940
third 21 August 1940 30 August 1940
fourth 1 October 1940 11 October 1940
fifth 26 November 1940 6 December 1940
sixth 12 March 1941 27 March 1941
seventh 10 June 1941 12 June 1941
eight 15 July 1941 17 October 1941
ninth 11 December 1941 12 December 1941
tenth 5 February 1942 12 February 1942
eleventh 17 March 1942 20 March 1942
twelfth 28 April 1942 9 May 1942
thirteenth 24 June 1942 10 July 1942
fourteenth 18 August 1942 20 August 1942
fifteenth 14 October 1942 22 October 1942
sixteenth 2 December 1942 4 December 1942
seventeenth 24 February 1943 18 March 1943
eighteenth 19 May 1943 2 July 1943
nineteenth 20 July 1943 25 August 1943

Ministries[edit]

The Labour Party had been in power since December 1935, and Michael Joseph Savage led the Savage Ministry.[4] The opposition had consisted of the United Party and the Reform Party, which merged in 1936 during the term of the 25th Parliament to form the National Party. The First Labour Government was confirmed at the 1938 general election with an increased majority, and the Savage Ministry remained until Savage's death on 27 March 1940.[5]

Savage was succeeded as Prime Minister by Peter Fraser, who formed the Fraser Ministry on 1 April 1940. The first Fraser Ministry resigned on 30 April 1940 and was reappointed, with some portfolios adjusted.[6] The second Fraser Ministry remained in power until its defeat by the National Party at the 1949 election.[7][8]

A War Cabinet was formed on 16 July 1940, which held the responsibility for all decisions relating to New Zealand's involvement in WWII. The War Cabinet was dissolved on 21 August 1945.[9] For some months in 1942, a War Administration was in place. Formed on 30 June and dissolved on 2 October, the War Administration had responsibility for all war matters, with the War Cabinet as its executive body.[9]

Initial composition of the 26th Parliament[edit]

The following table shows the initial composition of the 26th Parliament: Key

 Labour    National    Country Party    Independent    Independent Liberal  

[v · t · e] Electorate results for the New Zealand general election, 1938[10][11]
Electorate Incumbent Winner Majority Runner up
General electorates
Auckland Central Bill Parry 6,181 Clifford Reid Dodd[12] (National)
Auckland East Frederick Schramm 2,626 Harry T Merritt[13] (National)
Auckland Suburbs Rex Mason 4,862 M S Walker (National)
Auckland West Michael Joseph Savage 8,007 John W Kealy[14] (National)
Avon Dan Sullivan 6,179 Hiram Hunter (National)
Awarua James Hargest 660 J A Beck (Labour)
Bay of Islands Harold Rushworth Charles Boswell 163 H F Guy (National)
Bay of Plenty Gordon Hultquist 169 Bill Sullivan (National)
Buller Paddy Webb 6,144 T O Maddison (National)
Central Otago William Bodkin 1,231 J M MacKay (Labour)
Christchurch East Tim Armstrong 7,179 K I Armour (National)
Christchurch North Sidney Holland 492 Robert Macfarlane (Labour)
Christchurch South Ted Howard 5,995 Gladstone Ward[15] (National)
Clutha James Roy 714 John Edie (Labour)
Dunedin Central Peter Neilson 3,814 W J Meade (National)
Dunedin North James Wright Munro 3,557 Alexander Smith Falconer[16] (National)
Dunedin South Fred Jones 4,314 Rev. Ernest Aderman (National)
Dunedin West Dr Gervan McMillan 2,639 Thomas Kay Stuart Sidey[17] (National)
Eden Bill Anderton 2,333 Donald Pool[18] (National)
Egmont Charles Wilkinson 1,402 T E Trask (Labour)
Franklin Arthur Sexton Jack Massey 2,057 E Piggott (Labour)
Gisborne David William Coleman 3,640 K F Jones (National)
Grey Lynn John A. Lee 8,607 J A Govan (National)
Hamilton Charles Barrell 1,860 Albert W Grant[19] (National)
Hauraki Charles Robert Petrie John Manchester Allen 1,188 Robert Coulter (Labour)
Hawkes Bay Edward Luttrell Cullen 2,658 George Maddison[20][21] (National)
Hurunui George Forbes 535 H E Denton (Labour)
Hutt Walter Nash 6,814 J W Andrews (National)
Invercargill William Denham 2,156 F G Hall-Jones[17] (National)
Kaiapoi Morgan Williams 1,535 G C Warren (National)
Kaipara Gordon Coates 1,689 P McGregor Stewart (Labour)
Lyttelton Terry McCombs 2,984 I J Wilson (National)
Manawatu Clifford Hunter John Cobbe 1,644 Clifford Hunter (Labour)
Marlborough (new electorate) Edwin Meachen 1,525 Edward Healy (National)
Marsden James Gillespie Barclay 557 Alfred Murdoch (National)
Masterton John Robertson 190 J H Irving (National)
Mataura David McDougall Tom Macdonald 1,515 David McDougall (Labour)
Mid-Canterbury Horace Herring Arthur Grigg 74 Horace Herring (Labour)
Motueka Keith Holyoake Clarence Skinner 870 Keith Holyoake (National)
Napier Bill Barnard 3,937 John Ormond[22] (National)
Nelson Harry Atmore 886 J R Kerr (National)
New Plymouth Sydney George Smith Frederick Frost 869 Sydney George Smith (National)
Oamaru Arnold Nordmeyer 758 Michael Francis Edward Cooney[23] (National)
Onehunga (new electorate) Arthur Osborne 4,314 John Park[24][25] (National)
Otahuhu (new electorate) Charles Robert Petrie 2,267 Kenneth Boor Tennent[26] (National)
Otaki Leonard Lowry 1,367 George Alexander Monk[27] (National)
Pahiatua Alfred Ransom 931 G A Hansen[28] (Labour)
Palmerston North Joe Hodgens 2,118 Jimmy Nash[29] (National)
Patea Harold Dickie 809 Charles Joseph Duggan[30][31] (Labour)
Raglan Lee Martin 604 Andrew Sutherland[32] (National)
Rangitikei Ormond Wilson Edward Gordon 311 Ormond Wilson (Labour)
Remuera (new electorate) Bill Endean 2,861 Mary Dreaver[33] (Labour)
Riccarton Herbert Kyle 87 Thomas Herbert Langford[34] (Labour)
Roskill Arthur Shapton Richards 2,141 A S Bailey (National)
Rotorua Alexander Moncur 1,648 H W Nixon[35] (National)
Stratford William Polson 1,101 J W McMillan (Labour)
Tauranga Charles Harris Burnett Frederick Doidge 1,138 Charles Harris Burnett (Labour)
Temuka Thomas David Burnett 1,249 J A Kearton (Labour)
Thames Jim Thorn 2,295 W A Clark (National)
Timaru Clyde Carr 2,196 W H Hall (National)
Waikato Robert Coulter William Goosman 2,928 J W Neate (Labour)
Waimarino Frank Langstone 2,940 C A Boles (National)
Waipawa Hubert Christie Albert Jull 446 Hubert Christie (Labour)
Wairarapa Benjamin Roberts 777 J F Thompson[36] (National)
Waitaki David Barnes David Campbell Kidd 14 David Barnes (Labour)
Waitemata Jack Lyon 2,261 J E Close (National)
Waitomo Walter Broadfoot 329 Jack Jones[37] (Labour)
Wallace Adam Hamilton 844 J J Lynch (Labour)
Wanganui Joseph Cotterill 3,920 Bill Veitch (National)
Wellington Central Peter Fraser 3,837 Will Appleton[38] (National)
Wellington East Bob Semple 4,736 W L Barker (National)
Wellington North Charles Henry Chapman 3,278 Elizabeth Gilmer[39] (Independent Liberal)
Wellington South Robert McKeen 6,415 David Howlett[40] (National)
Wellington Suburbs Robert Alexander Wright Harry Ernest Combs 3,163 Ossie Mazengarb (National)
Wellington West (new electorate) Catherine Stewart 956 Robert Alexander Wright (National)
Westland James O'Brien 3,729 Edward Bickmore Ellison Taylor (Independent)
Māori electorates
Eastern Maori Apirana Ngata 1,064 Reweti Tuhorouta Kohere (Labour)
Northern Maori Taurekareka Henare Paraire Karaka Paikea 2,011 Taurekareka Henare (National)
Southern Maori Eruera Tirikatene 485 Thomas Kaiporohu Bragg (National)
Western Maori Toko Ratana 4,267 Pei Te Hurinui Jones (Independent)

By-elections during 26th Parliament[edit]

There were a number of changes during the term of the 26th Parliament.

Electorate and by-election Date Incumbent Cause Winner
Christchurch South 1939 3 June Ted Howard Death Robert Macfarlane
Auckland West 1940 18 May Michael Joseph Savage Death Peter Carr
Waipawa 1940 16 November Albert Jull Death Cyril Harker
Waitemata 1941 19 July Jack Lyon Death Mary Dreaver
Bay of Plenty 1941 13 December Gordon Hultquist Death Bill Sullivan
Mid-Canterbury 1942 27 January Arthur Grigg Death Mary Grigg
Hauraki 1942 7 February John Allen Death Andrew Sutherland
Temuka 1942 7 February Thomas Burnett Death Jack Acland
Christchurch East 1943 6 February Tim Armstrong Death Mabel Howard
Northern Maori 1943 19 June Paraire Karaka Paikea Death (by-election postponed by legislation)[41]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "General elections 1853–2005 - dates & turnout". Elections New Zealand. Retrieved 10 December 2011. 
  2. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 90.
  3. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 70.
  4. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 48.
  5. ^ Gustafson, Barry. "Savage, Michael Joseph - Biography". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 11 December 2011. 
  6. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 50.
  7. ^ Beaglehole, Tim. "Fraser, Peter - Biography". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 11 December 2011. 
  8. ^ Scholefield 1950, pp. 50–51.
  9. ^ a b Scholefield 1950, p. 52.
  10. ^ "The General Election, 1938". National Library. 1939. pp. 1–6. Retrieved 8 February 2012. 
  11. ^ "Candidates for tomorrow's election". Evening Post. CXXVI (91). 14 October 1938. p. 18. Retrieved 3 August 2013. 
  12. ^ "Notice of Nominations Received and Polling Places Appointed". Auckland Star LXVI (268). 12 November 1935. p. 9. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  13. ^ Gustafson 1986, pp. 26, 28.
  14. ^ Gustafson 1986, p. 370.
  15. ^ "The By-Election". Evening Post. CXXVII (128). 2 June 1939. p. 8. Retrieved 13 November 2011. 
  16. ^ Gustafson 1986, p. 362.
  17. ^ a b "The Mantle of Seddon". Evening Post. CXXVI (90). 13 October 1938. p. 24. Retrieved 3 November 2013. 
  18. ^ "Election Review". Evening Post. CXXVI (83). 5 October 1938. p. 15. Retrieved 2 November 2013. 
  19. ^ Gustafson 1986, p. 366.
  20. ^ Webb, Brendan (20 September 2010). "No Sign of Mayors". BayBuzz. Retrieved 2 November 2013. 
  21. ^ "Hawke's Bay Seats". Evening Post. CXXVI (90). 13 October 1938. p. 11. Retrieved 13 November 2011. 
  22. ^ Bremer, Robert James. "Ormond, John Davies Wilder". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 9 January 2010. 
  23. ^ "Otago Contests". Evening Post. CXXVI (73). 23 September 1938. p. 10. Retrieved 5 November 2013. 
  24. ^ "The Onehunga Seat". Evening Post. CXXVI (59). 7 September 1938. p. 5. Retrieved 5 November 2013. 
  25. ^ "Discover Onehunga’s Rich History". Onehunga Business Association. Retrieved 5 November 2013. 
  26. ^ "Parliamentary Elections". Auckland Star LXIX (233). 3 October 1938. p. 11. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  27. ^ "Public Notices". Evening Post. CXXVI (82). 4 October 1938. p. 4. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  28. ^ "Labour Candidates". Evening Post CXXV (82). 7 April 1938. p. 17. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  29. ^ "J. A. Nash". Evening Post. CXXVI (89). 12 October 1938. p. 18. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  30. ^ "The Labour Party". Auckland Star LXIX (192). 16 August 1938. p. 5. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  31. ^ "Labour Candidates". Evening Post CX (61). 9 September 1925. p. 6. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  32. ^ Gustafson 1986, p. 345.
  33. ^ Laracy, Hugh. "Dreaver, Mary Manson". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 22 July 2012. 
  34. ^ "Tammany Hall". Evening Post CXL (52). 30 August 1945. p. 9. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  35. ^ "General Election". Auckland Star LXIX (116). 19 May 1938. p. 10. Retrieved 7 November 2013. 
  36. ^ "Wairarapa Electorate". Upper Hutt Weekly Review III (43). 14 October 1938. p. 3. Retrieved 9 November 2013. 
  37. ^ "Mrs. R. Bleasel". Auckland Star LXIX (277). 23 November 1938. p. 4. Retrieved 9 November 2013. 
  38. ^ Buchan, Allison. "Appleton, William". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 10 January 2012. 
  39. ^ Labrum, Bronwyn. "Gilmer, Elizabeth May". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved January 2013. 
  40. ^ "General Election". Evening Post. CXXVI (45). 22 August 1938. p. 10. Retrieved 10 November 2013. 
  41. ^ "By-election Postponement Act 1943". Retrieved 8 March 2012. 

References[edit]

  • Gustafson, Barry (1986). The First 50 Years : A History of the New Zealand National Party. Auckland: Reed Methuen. ISBN 0-474-00177-6. 
  • Scholefield, Guy (1950) [First published in 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1949 (3rd ed.). Wellington: Govt. Printer. 
  • Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First published in 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103.