26th Tony Awards

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26th Tony Awards
Date April 23, 1972
Location The Broadway Theatre, New York City, New York
Host Henry Fonda, Deborah Kerr and Peter Ustinov
Television/Radio coverage
Network ABC
25th Tony Awards 27th >

The 26th Annual Tony Awards was broadcast by ABC television on April 23, 1972 from The Broadway Theatre in New York City. Hosts were Henry Fonda, Deborah Kerr and Peter Ustinov.

The ceremony[edit]

Presenters were Richard Benjamin, Ingrid Bergman, Claire Bloom, Arlene Dahl, Sandy Duncan, Peter Falk, Lee Grant, Joel Grey, Arthur Hill, Hal Holbrook, Jean Stapleton, and Gwen Verdon.

Performers were Desi Arnaz, Janet Blair, Larry Blyden, Alfred Drake, Helen Gallagher, Lisa Kirk, Hal Linden, Barbara McNair, Ethel Merman, and Constance Towers.

Musicals represented:

Special Tony Awards were presented to Ethel Merman and Richard Rodgers. For Rodgers, there was a medley from his works, from Garrick Gaieties to Do I Hear A Waltz, with the composer accepting his award to the tune of "The Sound of Music." With the assistance of Hal Linden and Larry Blyden, Merman herself sang selections from her performances, including "I Got Rhythm" and "Everything's Comin' Up Roses."[1]

Winners and nominees[edit]

Winners are in bold

Best Play Best Musical
Best Book of a Musical Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theatre
Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play
Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical
Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Play Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play
Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical
Best Direction of a Play Best Direction of a Musical
Best Choreography Best Scenic Design
Best Costume Design Best Lighting Design

Special awards[edit]

  • The Theatre Guild--American Theatre Society, for its many years of service to audiences for touring shows.
  • Fiddler on the Roof, on becoming the longest-running musical in Broadway history. Presented to Harold Prince
  • Ethel Merman
  • Richard Rodgers

References[edit]

  1. ^ O'Connor, John.New York Times, April 25, 1972,p.86

External links[edit]