27 Euterpe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
27 Euterpe
27Euterpe (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 27 Euterpe based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by J. R. Hind
Discovery date November 8, 1853
Designations
Pronunciation /juːˈtɜrp/ ew-TUR-pee
Named after
Euterpē
1945 KB
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics
Epoch June 14, 2006 (JD 2453900.5)
Aphelion 411.552 Gm (2.751 AU)
Perihelion 290.966 Gm (1.945 AU)
351.259 Gm (2.348 AU)
Eccentricity 0.172
1314.171 d (3.60 a)
19.29 km/s
126.457°
Inclination 1.584°
94.807°
356.754°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 124×75 km (Dunham)
105.80 ± 7.23[1] km
Mass (1.67 ± 1.01) × 1018[1] kg
Mean density
2.69 ± 1.71[1] g/cm3
0.0268? m/s²
0.0508? km/s
0.4338 d (10.41 h) [2]
Albedo 0.162 (geometric[3]
Temperature ~178 K
Spectral type
S
8.30 to 12.55
7.0
0.13" to 0.035"

27 Euterpe is a large main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by J. R. Hind on November 8, 1853, and named after Euterpē, the Muse of music in Greek mythology.

Euterpe is one of the brightest asteroids in the night sky.[4] On December 25, 2015, during a perihelic opposition, it will shine with an apparent magnitude of 8.3.[5]

Euterpe has been studied by radar.[6][vague]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), Density of asteroids, Planetary and Space Science 73: 98-118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  2. ^ http://www.psi.edu/pds/asteroid/EAR_A_5_DDR_DERIVED_LIGHTCURVE_V8_0/data/lc.tab
  3. ^ http://www.psi.edu/pds/asteroid/EAR_A_5_DDR_ALBEDOS_V1_1/data/albedos.tab
  4. ^ "Bright Minor Planets 2004". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2008-05-20. 
  5. ^ Yeomans, Donald K. "Horizons Online Ephemeris System". California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2008-05-20. 
  6. ^ "Radar-Detected Asteroids and Comets". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 2011-10-30. 

External links[edit]