290s BC

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

During the 290s BC, Hellenistic civilization begins its emergence throughout the successor states of the former Argead Macedonian Empire of Alexander the Great resulting in the diffusion of Greek culture throughout the Ancient world and advances in Science, mathematics, philosophy and etc. Meanwhile, the Roman Republic is embroiled in war against the Samnites, the Mauryan Empire continues to thrive in Ancient India, and the Kingdom of Qin in Ancient China, the one which in the future will conquer its adversaries and unite China, begins to emerge as a significant power during the Warring States period.

Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries: 4th century BC3rd century BC2nd century BC
Decades: 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC290s BC280s BC 270s BC 260s BC
Years: 299 BC 298 BC 297 BC 296 BC 295 BC 294 BC 293 BC 292 BC 291 BC 290 BC
Categories: BirthsDeathsArchitecture
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

290s BC: events by year[edit]

Contents: 299 BC 298 BC 297 BC 296 BC 295 BC 294 BC 293 BC 292 BC 291 BC 290 BC

299 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

China[edit]

  • The state of Qin attacks eight cities of the state of Chu. Chu then sends an envoy to ask the King of Huai to go to Qin to negotiate peace. Qu Yuan risks his life to go up to the court to persuade the King of Huai not to go to the negotiation.
  • King Wuling of Zhao abdicates the throne of Zhao to his son.

298 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Sicily[edit]

Egypt[edit]

  • Ptolemy gives his stepdaughter Theoxena in marriage to Agathocles, the tyrant of Syracuse (in south-eastern Sicily).
  • Ptolemy finally brings the rebellious region of Cyrene under his control. He places the region under the rule of his stepson Magas.

India[edit]

297 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Greece[edit]

India[edit]

296 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

  • The temple to Bellona is erected at the south end of the prata Flaminia, later the Circus Flaminius, in Rome.[1]

295 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Greece[edit]

294 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • Archidamus IV, king of Sparta, son of Eudamidas I and grandson of Archidamus III, is defeated by Demetrius Poliorcetes of Macedonia in a battle at Mantinea. Sparta is saved only because Demetrius is called away by the threatening activities of his rivals Lysimachus and Ptolemy.
  • Alexander V of Macedon is ousted by his brother, Antipater II. Therefore Alexander V turns to Demetrius Poliorcetes for help in recovering his throne. However, Demetrius Poliorcetes establishes himself on the throne of Macedonia and then murders Alexander V. Antipater II loses the throne of Macedonia but is able to survive.
  • Pyrrhus of Epirus exploits the dynastic quarrel in Macedonia involving Alexander V of Macedon, his brother, Antipater II and Demetrius Poliorcetes to take over the frontier areas of Parauaea and Tymphaea, along with Acarnania, Ampholochia, and Ambracia.
  • Lysimachus concludes a peace with Demetrius Poliorcetes whereby Demetrius Poliorcetes is recognized as ruler of Macedonia.

Egypt[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

  • Stratonice, daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes and wife of Seleucus marries her stepson Antiochus. Seleucus has reportedly instigated the marriage after discovering that his son by his late wife Apama was in danger of dying of lovesickness as he has fallen in love with his beautiful stepmother.

293 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

  • The Battle of Aquilonia is fought between the Roman Republic and the Samnites, near the current city of Aquilonia in Campania (in southern Italy). The Romans, led by the consuls Lucius Papirius Cursor and Spurius Carvilius Maximus, are victorious. After the battle, the Samnites flee into the city of Aquilonia and into their camp. The camp is captured and looted by the Romans, while the city is eventually taken, with many of the Samnite survivors being slaughtered in the fighting.
  • Rome suffers from the plague. The worship of Aesculapius is introduced from Epidaurus to Rome in the hope of averting the plague.

Persia[edit]

  • When an invasion of nomads threatens the eastern possessions of his realm (i.e. between the Caspian Sea and the Aral Sea and the Indian Ocean), Seleucus hands over the government of these lands west of the Euphrates to his son Antiochus. Antiochus is appointed co-regent and commander-in-chief of these territories.

China[edit]

292 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • Lysimachus tries to extend his influence beyond the Danube River, but he is defeated and taken prisoner by the Getae (Dacian) king Dromichaetes (Dromihete). Eventually, Lysimachus is set free and a peace is agreed between the Getae and Lysimachus. This peace agreement is strengthened further by the marriage of Dromichaetes with Lysimachus' daughter.
  • While Demetrius Poliorcetes is campaigning in Boeotia, he receives news that Lysimachus, the ruler of Thrace, has been taken prisoner by Dromichaetes. Hoping to seize Lysimachus's territories in Thrace, Demetrius, delegates command of his forces in Boeotia to his son, Antigonus and immediately marches north. However, while he is away, the Boeotians rise in rebellion, but are defeated by Antigonus, who bottles them up in the city of Thebes and puts them under siege.

291 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

290 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

  • Roman general and consul, Manius Curius Dentatus, gains a decisive victory over the Samnites, thereby ending a war that has lasted 50 years. He also reduces the Sabine insurgents to submission, their territory is annexed and they are granted civitas sine suffragio ("citizenship without the right to vote"). The Samnites are recognised by the Romans as autonomous allies. The Samnites are forced to give up some of their land to the Romans as compensation.

Egypt[edit]

  • Berenice, wife of Ptolemy, is proclaimed queen of Egypt. Ptolemy has the city of Berenice built on the Red Sea in her honour. It becomes a great emporium for Egyptian trade with the East.


Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Platner and Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Rome. Oxford University Press, 1926. p. 82.
  2. ^ [1]