291 Alice

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291 Alice
291Alice (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 291 Alice based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Johann Palisa
Discovery date April 25, 1890
Designations
Alternative names 1954 UJ3
Minor planet category main belt (Flora family)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 30 January 2005 (JD 2453400.5)
Aphelion 363.171 Gm (2.428 AU)
Perihelion 301.612 Gm (2.016 AU)
Semi-major axis 332.392 Gm (2.222 AU)
Eccentricity 0.093
Orbital period 1209.699 d (3.31 a)
Average orbital speed 19.98 km/s
Mean anomaly 305.558°
Inclination 1.853°
Longitude of ascending node 161.696°
Argument of perihelion 331.644°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 19×12×11 km [2][3]
Mass ~5×1015 (estimate)
Mean density ~2.7 g/cm³ (estimate) [4]
Equatorial surface gravity ~0.006 m/s² (estimate)
Escape velocity ~0.009 km/s (estimate)
Rotation period 0.180 d (4.32 h) [5]
Albedo 0.208 [2]
Temperature ~181 K
max: 267 K (-5°C)
Spectral type S [5]
Absolute magnitude (H) 11.45

291 Alice is an asteroid belonging to the Flora family in the main belt. It was discovered by Johann Palisa on April 25, 1890 at the Vienna Observatory.

Photometric observations of this asteroid at the Leura Observatory in Leura, Australia during 2006 gave a rotation period of 4.313 ± 0.002 hours and a brightness variation of 0.20 ± 0.02 in magnitude. This result is in agreement with previous studies.[6] Lightcurve analysis indicates that Alice's pole points towards either ecliptic coordinates (β, λ) = (55°, 65°) or (β, λ) = (55°, 245°) with a 10° uncertainty.[3] This gives an axial tilt of about 35° in both cases.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yeomans, Donald K., "291 Alice", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 2013-03-30. 
  2. ^ a b Supplemental IRAS Minor Planet Survey
  3. ^ a b A. Kryszczyńska et al. (1996). "CCD Photometry of Seven Asteroids: New Spin Axis and Shape Determinations". Icarus 124: 134. Bibcode:1996Icar..124..134K. doi:10.1006/icar.1996.0194. 
  4. ^ G. A. Krasinsky et al. (2002). "Hidden Mass in the Asteroid Belt". Icarus 158: 98. Bibcode:2002Icar..158...98K. doi:10.1006/icar.2002.6837. 
  5. ^ a b PDS lightcurve data
  6. ^ Oey, Julian (December 2006), "Lightcurves analysis of 10 asteroids from Leura Observatory", Bulletin of the Minor Planets Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers 33 (4): 96–99, Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...96O.