29th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment

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29th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment
Active December 17, 1863 to June 21, 1866
Country United States
Allegiance Union
Branch Infantry
Size Regiment
Mascot Major (a dog), killed in action at Sabine Cross Roads April 8, 1864
Engagements Red River Campaign
Battle of Sabine Crossroads
Sheridan's Valley Campaign
Battle of Opequan
Battle of Fisher's Hill
Battle of Cedar Creek

The 29th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Service[edit]

The 29th Maine Infantry was organized in Augusta, Maine and mustered in December 17, 1863 for three years' service. The regiment was composed primarily of re-enlisted veterans of the 10th Maine Infantry, and its full name was the 29th Maine Veteran Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was under the command of Colonel George Lafayette Beal, previously the commander of the 10th Maine, who also served as their brigade commander from April 19, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel Charles S. Emerson was the de facto (acting) commander of the regiment until he was sent back to Maine on account of illness on August 27, 1864. Command then devolved on Major William Knowlton who died of wounds received at Opequan on September 20, 1864. Captain George H. Nye was then promoted to major on October 18, 1864 and assumed command of the regiment.

Colonel Beal was promoted to brigadier general and Major Nye was elected by a vote of the regiment's officers to become the regimental commander and was promoted to colonel on November 30, 1864 - at which time Nye became de jure (actual) regimental commander.

Company A and Company D were transferred in from the 10th Maine Infantry Battalion (which was disbanded at this time) on May 30, 1864. The 10th Maine Battalion was composed of three-year men from the 10th Maine.

The regiment was attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, XIX Corps, Department of the Gulf, to July 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, XIX Corps, Department of the Gulf and Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to March 1865. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Army of the Shenandoah, to April 1865. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Department of Washington, to June 1865. District of South Carolina, Department of the South, to June 1866.

Company A mustered out October 18, 1864 (having departed from the field in the Shenandoah Valley October 5, 1864) at the expiration of its original enlistment, and was replaced by the one-year men of the 1st Unassigned Company of Maine Infantry as "new" Company A, which reported for duty October 6, 1864. The remainder of the 29th Maine Infantry mustered out of service June 21, 1866.

The regiment's history, History of the 1st-10th-29th Maine Regiment, was written by Major John Mead Gould. The regiment's flags are preserved in the Maine State Museum.[1][2]

Detailed service[edit]

Left Maine for New Orleans, La., January 31, arriving February 16, 1864. Moved to Brashear City, La., February 20, 1864; then to Franklin February 21. Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Advance from Franklin to Alexandria March 14–26. Battle of Sabine Cross Roads April 8. Pleasant Hill April 9. Monett's Bluff, Cane River Crossing, April 23. At Alexandria April 25-May 13. Construction of dam at Alexandria April 30-May 10. Retreat to Morganza May 13–22. Mansura May 16. Duty at Morganza until July 2. Absorbed 10th Maine Battalion May 30. Moved to New Orleans, then to Washington, D.C., July 2–13. Snicker's Gap Expedition July 14–23. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Berryville August 21 and September 3–4. Battle of Opequan, Winchester, September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty near Middletown until November 9. At Newton until December 30, and at Stevenson's Depot until April 1865. Moved to Washington, D.C., and duty there April 22 to June 1. Provost duty during the Grand Review of the Armies May 23–24. Moved to Savannah, Ga., June 1–5, then to Georgetown, S.C., June 14–15. Duty at various points in South Carolina, with headquarters at Darlington until March 1865. Moved to Hilton Head, S.C., March 27, and duty there until June 21. (A detachment at Helena and Seabrook Islands.)

Casualties[edit]

The regiment lost a total of 237 men during service; 2 officers and 40 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, 4 officers and 191 enlisted men due to disease.

Commanders[edit]

  • Colonel George Lafayette Beal - December 17, 1863 - April 19, 1864
  • Lieutenant Colonel Charles S. Emerson (acting commander) - April 19, 1864 - August 27, 1864
  • Major William Knowlton - August 27, 1864 - September 20, 1864 (died of wounds received at Opequan).
  • Colonel George H. Nye - September 20, 1864 - June 29, 1866 (mustered out with the regiment)[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Dyer, Frederick H. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion (Des Moines, IA: Dyer Pub. Co.), 1908.
  • Edwards, Abial Hall. "Dear Friend Anna": The Civil War Letters of a Common Soldier from Maine (Orono, ME: University of Maine Press), 1992. ISBN 0-89101-079-3
  • Gould, John Mead. The Civil War Journals of John Mead Gould, 1861-1866 (Baltimore, MD: Butternut and Blue), 1997. ISBN 0-935523-63-4
  • Gould, John Mead. Directory of the First - Tenth - Twenty-ninth Maine regiment Association (Portland, ME: S. Berry, Printer), 1889.
  • Gould, John Mead & Leonard G. Jordan. History of the First - Tenth - Twenty-Ninth Maine Regiment: In Service of the United States from May 3, 1861, to June 21, 1866 (Portland, ME: S. Berry, Printer), 1871.
Attribution
  • This article contains text from a text now in the public domain: Dyer, Frederick H. (1908). A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion. Des Moines, IA: Dyer Publishing Co.

External links[edit]