2C–H

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2C–H
2C-H-Chemdraw.png
2C-H-3d-sticks.png 2C-H animation.gif
Identifiers
CAS number 3600-86-0 YesY
PubChem 76632
ChemSpider 69096 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL287047 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C10H15NO2
Molar mass 181.23 g/mol
Melting point 138–139 °C (hydrochloride)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
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Infobox references

2C–H, or 2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine, is a lesser-known substituted phenethylamine of the 2C family. 2C–H was first synthesized 1932 by Johannes S. Buck.[1] In the book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved), Alexander Shulgin lists both the dosage and duration of 2C–H as unknown.[2] There is no record of 2C–H trials in humans, as it would likely be destroyed by monoamine oxidase enzymes before causing any significant psychoactive effects.[3] Very little data exists about the pharmacological properties, metabolism, and toxicity of 2C–H.

2C–H has been found in trace amounts by the DEA's south central laboratory in tablets that were suspected of containing MDMA.[citation needed] It is used as a precursor in the synthesis of other substituted phenethylamines.[citation needed]

As of July 9, 2012, 2C–H is a Schedule I substance in the United States, under the Synthetic Drug Abuse Prevention Act of 2012.[4] Note that the previous mention of it being schedule I is not correct. The bill was never enacted. Please review: "This bill was introduced on May 16, 2012, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted." - https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/112/s3190

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Buck, Johannes S. (1932). "Hydroxy- and Dihydroxyphenylethylmethylamines and their Ether". Journal of Chemical Society 54 (9): 3661–3665. doi:10.1021/ja01348a024. 
  2. ^ Shulgin, Alexander; Ann Shulgin (September 1991). PiHKAL: A Chemical Love Story. Berkeley, California: Transform Press. ISBN 0-9630096-0-5. OCLC 25627628. 
  3. ^ Shulgin, Alexander; Ann Shulgin (September 1991). PiHKAL: A Chemical Love Story. Berkeley, California: Transform Press. ISBN 0-9630096-0-5. OCLC 25627628. 
  4. ^ Portman. "Synthetic Drug Abuse Prevention Act of 2012". Govtrack. Retrieved 22 July 2012. 

External links[edit]