2C-T-13

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2C-T-13
2C-T-132DACS.svg
2C-T-13-3d-sticks.png
Identifiers
CAS number 207740-30-5 N
ChemSpider 21106228 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL123868 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C13H21NO3S
Molar mass 271.38 g/mol
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 N (verify) (what is: YesY/N?)
Infobox references

2C-T-13 or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-(β-methoxyethylthio)phenethylamine is a psychedelic phenethylamine of the 2C family. It was presumably first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin and reported in his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved).

Chemistry[edit]

2C-T-13 is the 2 carbon homologue of Aleph-13. The full chemical name is 2-[4-(2-methoxyethylthio)-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl]ethanamine. The drug has structural properties similar to mescaline and other drugs in the 2C-T series, with the most closely related compounds being 2C-T-7 and 2C-T-21.

General information[edit]

The dosage range of 2C-T-13 is typically 25 - 40 mg and its duration is approximately 6–8 hours according to Shulgin. 2C-T-13 produces many closed-eye visuals and geometric patterns. It also produces slight visual distortion.[1]

Pharmacology[edit]

The mechanism that produces 2C-T-13's hallucinogenic and entheogenic effects has not been specifically established, however it is most likely to result from action as a 5-HT2A serotonin receptor agonist in the brain, a mechanism of action shared by all of the hallucinogenic tryptamines and phenethylamines for which the mechanism of action is known.

Dangers[edit]

The toxicity of 2C-T-13 is not well documented. 2C-T-13 is slightly less potent than 2C-T-7, but it may be expected that at higher doses it would display similar toxicity to that of other phenethylamines of the 2C-T family. Other phenethylamine derivatives substituted with an alkylthio group at the 4 position such as 2C-T-7 and 4-MTA are known to act as selective monoamine oxidase A inhibitors, a side effect which can lead to lethal serotonin syndrome when they are combined with stimulant drugs. Most confirmed fatalities involving 2C-T drugs involve their combination with other hard drugs such as alcohol, ecstasy or cocaine.

Legality[edit]

2C-T-13 is not illegal, but possession and sales of 2C-T-13 could be prosecuted under the Federal Analog Act because of its structural similarities to 2C-T-7.

References[edit]

External links[edit]