2GO

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For the airline, see 2GO (Air). For the Central Coast, New South Wales radio station, see 2GGO.
2GO Travel
Industry Shipping
Founded Aboitiz
Headquarters

15th Floor, Times Plaza Bldg., United Nations Ave. Cor Taft Ave.

Ermita, Manila, Philippines 1000
Key people Francis C. Chua, Chairman & Independent Director
Sulficio O. Tagud Jr., President & CEO
Stephen Rey R. Tagud, Vice President for Passage & CCO
Fred S. Pajo, Executive Vice President & COO
Parent 2GO Group
Website http://travel.2go.com.ph
2GO Travel kiosk in an Iloilo City mall.

2GO, formally 2GO Travel, is a ferry company which is based in Manila, Philippines and part of 2GO Group, a private company owned by the Chinese government through the China-Asean Investment Cooperation Fund.[1][2][3] It is the largest ferry company in the Philippines with its main hub located in Eva Macapagal Super Terminal in Pier 15 in the Manila South Harbor.[4]

Until 2012, 2GO was known as Negros Navigation. It changed its name following a significant realignment of ferry transportation in the Philippines which saw long-standing companies SuperFerry, Cebu Ferries and SuperCat first merged into SuperFerry, under the Aboitiz Transport System, and then purchased by Negros Navigation, in December 2010, for US$105 million.[4] At the same time, a unit of China-Asean Investment Cooperation Fund, a Netherlands-based, private equity firm wholly owned by the Chinese government, took a controlling stake in Negros Navigation through an equity infusion.[1][3][4] Because Negros Navigation was a privately held firm the exact amount invested by the Fund was not disclosed.[2]

2GO has one of the most modern shipping fleets in the Philippines and operates the largest fleet of inter-island vessels in the country.[5]

Destinations[edit]

The following the ports of call are served by 2GO Travel:

Incidents[edit]

MV St. Thomas Aquinas[edit]

Main article: MV St. Thomas Aquinas

On August 16, 2013, at 9 pm as it approached Cebu City's harbor, the MV St. Thomas Aquinas, formerly SuperFerry 2 [6] collided with the cargo ship Sulpicio Express Siete of Sulpicio Lines and sank in 100 feet deep off Talisay, Cebu.[7] The ship was carrying 831 people—715 passengers and 116 crewmembers.[7] 629 people were rescued immediately and as of August 17, 2013, 31 bodies have been recovered leaving 172 unaccounted for.[7] The Sulpicio Express Siete with 36 crew members on board did not sink and returned safely to port.[7] It had a large hole in its bow above the water line, clearly visible in news photos.[7]

Vessels[edit]

2GO acquired in the merger vessels from all four brands. The vessels now carry names deriverd from one of the many Our Lady titles of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Mother of Jesus, or from Catholic saints. The ships have now been repainted in the 2GO colors and sport the 2GO Travel logo.

MV St Leo the Great of 2GO Travel docked at the Manila North Harbor.
MT San Rafael Dos of 2GO Corporation docked at the Manila North Harbor.
2GO Travel inter-island ferry, Port of Iloilo, Iloilo Strait, Iloilo City
2GO Travel catamaran ferry to Bacolod on Iloilo River in Iloilo City

Vessels acquired from SuperFerry and Negros Navigation[edit]

These former SuperFerry and Negros Navigation vessels are now part of the 2GO Travel fleet (as of 2013):

Vessels acquired from Cebu Ferries[edit]

Cebu Ferries operated the following vessels that are now part of the 2GO fleet:

Vessels acquired from SuperCat[edit]

SuperCat, now part of 2GO, operated this vessels that are now part of the 2GO fleet:

St. Nuriel (formerly Supercat 22)[edit]

Supercat 22 docked at International Port of Batangas, Philippines

St. Nuriel is formerly SuperCat 22 M/V Mt. Samat Ferry 3, which was operated by defunct Philippine fast ferry company, Mt. Samat. The Supercat 22 was built by FBMA Marine Inc. (an Aboitiz Company) in Balamban, Cebu. This vessel uses a simple propulsion system, and is very fuel efficient. In July 2010, a second deck was added. She is currently serving the Batangas - Calapan route.

St. Sealthiel (formerly SuperCat 25)[edit]

Supercat 25 docked at Calapan Pier, Philippines

St. Sealthiel was formerly SuperCat 25 & M/V Mt. Samat Ferry 5, which was operated by defunct Philippine fast ferry company, Mt. Samat. She is a sister ship of Supercat 22 and was also built by FBMA Marine Inc. (an Aboitiz Company) in Balamban, Cebu. Similarly this vessel uses a simple propulsion system, and is very fuel efficient. She was renamed as M/V Smart in Korea, before ending up with Supercat Fast Ferry Corp. She is currently serving the Batangas - Calapan route.

St. Emmanuel (formerly SuperCat 26)[edit]

SuperCat 26 was the former SeaCat from Australia, traveling Perth to Rottnest Island. She has twin Caterpillar C32 engines and can cruise up to 28 knots. She's 25m in length. She is currently serving the Bacolod-Iloilo route in the Western Visayas region of the Philippines.

St. Jhudiel (formerly SuperCat 30)[edit]

Supercat 30

St. Jhudiel was formerly SuperCat 30 & formerly one of Elbe City Jet's catamaran. She was named Hanseblitz from 1996–2001 and was reconfigured and elevated its Captain's bridge at Abeking & Rasmussen, and later on acquired by Transtejo in Lisboa,Portugal renamed Bairro Alto until early 2008. She has two decks. The upper deck offers business class accommodation for elite passengers. This vessel was built by Lindstol Skips, in Risor Norway. Unlike the other Supercat vessels, this vessel is equipped with controllable pitch propellers as its propulsion system. Supercat 32 is her sister ship. She is currently serving the Cebu - Tagbilaran route.

St. Braquiel (formerly SuperCat 32)[edit]

Supercat 32 docked at Tagbilaran Port, Philippines

St. Braquiel was formerly SuperCat 32 & formerly one of Elbe City Jet's catamaran. She was named Hansepfeil from 1996–2002 and was reconfigured and elevated its Captain's bridge at Abeking & Rasmussen, and later on acquired by Transtejo in Lisboa,Portugal renamed Parque das Nacoes until early 2008. She has two decks. The upper deck offers business class accommodation for elite passengers. This vessel was built by Lindstol Skips, in Risor Norway. Unlike the other Supercat vessels, this vessel is equipped with controllable pitch propellers as its propulsion system. Supercat 30 is her sister ship. She is currently serving the Cebu-Ormoc route.

St. Benedict (formerly SuperCat 36)[edit]

St. Benedict is formerly known as SuperCat 36 & Blue Fin and one of the oldest (1990) and one of three JetCats (high speed catamarans) purchased for the run to Manly. The other two are Sea Eagle and Sir David Martin (Now Supercat 38), delivered in that order. They replaced the hydrofoils. She formerly served from Manly to Circular Quay from 1990-2008 before ending up with Supercat. She uses a KAMEWA waterjet-propulsion and her maximum service speed can reach up to 31 knots. St. Dominic (formerly SuperCat 38) is her sistership.

St. Dominic (formerly SuperCat 38)[edit]

Supercat 38 docking at Tagbilaran Port, Philippines

St. Dominic is formerly known as SuperCat 38 & Sir David Martin and one of the oldest (1990) and one of three JetCats (high speed catamarans) purchased for the run to Manly. The other two are Sea Eagle and Blue Fin (Now Supercat 36), delivered in that order. They replaced the hydrofoils. She formerly served from Manly to Circular Quay from 1990-2008 before ending up with Supercat. She uses a KAMEWA waterjet-propulsion and her maximum service speed can reach up to 31 knots and she is 34.8 metres long. St. Benedict (formerly SuperCat 36) is her sistership.

New Vessels of 2GO[edit]

Ship/(s) that has been acquired by 2GO Travel as of March 2014:

  • St. Francis Xavier [8] (former M/V Star Diamond and M/V Jiadong Pearl)

Former Vessels of 2GO[edit]

Ship/(s) that was part of 2GO fleets that were retired, sunk, or sold.

  • St. Uriel (formerly SuperCat 23) was the only high speed monohull vessel in the Supercat fleet. She uses a simple propulsion system and her fuel is efficient. She also offers an open deck accommodation at a more affordable price. She is currently in Cebu awaiting her fate after news that she was sold.
Supercat 23 cruising along Batangas Seas

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Negros takes out remaining Aboitiz stock". Baird Maritime. 7 January 2011. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Chinese firm to become top Philippine ferry operator". ABS-CBN News. 12/05/2010. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  3. ^ a b Gamboa, Rey (August 20, 2013). "Keeping our seas safe". Philippine Star. Retrieved 12 September 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c Cacho, Katlene O. (December 1, 2010). "Aboitiz sells transport unit". Sun Star Cebu. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  5. ^ Cebu Daily News (2007-02-21). "Ship with 640 people stalls midsea, towed". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved 2008-06-07. 
  6. ^ See photo at http://www.wakanatsu.com/philippine/photo/sf2.html
  7. ^ a b c d e De Jesus, Julliane (17 August 2013). "40 dead, 172 missing as two ships collide". Philippine Daily Inquirer (Agence France-Presse). Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  8. ^ http://www.philstar.com/business/2014/03/20/1302797/2go-travel-unveils-new-ship

External links[edit]