300s BC (decade)

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Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries: 5th century BC4th century BC3rd century BC
Decades: 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC300s BC290s BC 280s BC 270s BC
Years: 309 BC 308 BC 307 BC 306 BC 305 BC 304 BC 303 BC 302 BC 301 BC 300 BC
Categories: BirthsDeathsArchitecture
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

300s BC: events by year[edit]

Contents: 309 BC 308 BC 307 BC 306 BC 305 BC 304 BC 303 BC 302 BC 301 BC 300 BC

309 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Asia Minor[edit]

  • Ptolemy personally commands a fleet that captures the coastal regions of Lycia and Caria from Antigonus.

Greece[edit]

  • Cassander, who has held Roxana, widow of Alexander the Great, in prison for a number of years, has her put to death along with her young son Alexander, the nominal King Alexander IV of Macedon.
  • Antigonus attempts to renew his alliance with the Macedonian general and former regent Polyperchon, who still controls part of the Peloponnesus. He sends Heracles, the illegitimate son of Alexander the Great, to Polyperchon to be treated as a pretender to the throne of Macedonia.
  • Polyperchon manages to form an army consisting of 20,000 infantry and 1,000 cavalry and challenges Cassander's army. Instead of fighting, Cassander starts negotiations with Polyperchon. By offering to make him a general of his own army and placing him as governor of Peloponnesus, he convinces Polyperchon to change allegiance to him instead of Heracles. As a result Polyperchon murders Heracles and his mother Barsine.
  • Areus I succeeds his grandfather Cleomenes II as king of Sparta.
  • A census is carried out in Athens. 21,000 citizens, 10,000 foreign residents and 400,000 others – women, children and slaves – are living in the city.

Carthage[edit]

  • Since 480 BC, an aristocratic Council of Elders has effectively ruled Carthage. The titular king of Carthage, Bomilcar, attempts a coup to restore the monarchy to full power. His attempt fails, which leads to Carthage becoming in name as well as in fact a republic.
  • Leaving his brother Antander to continue the defence of Syracuse, Agathocles lands in North Africa with the aim of distracting the Carthaginians from their siege of Syracuse. Agathocles concludes a treaty with Ophellas, ruler of Cyrenaica. He then takes advantage of the civil unrest in Carthage and nearly succeeds in conquering the city.

Roman Republic[edit]

China[edit]

  • Soon after the State of Qin has conquered the State of Shu (in modern-day Sichuan province), they employ the Shu engineer Bi Ling to create the Guanxian irrigation system, which will eventually provide for over five million people in an area of 40 to 50 square miles (130 km2), still in use today.

308 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

307 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Babylonia[edit]

Egypt[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • The governor (despot) of Athens for 10 years and supporter of Cassander, Demetrius Phalereus, is obliged to flee from Athens on the approach of the Macedonian prince, Demetrius Poliorcetes. Demetrius Phalereus settles in Alexandria in Egypt.
  • Demetrius Poliorcetes re-establishes the old Athenian constitution. The grateful Athenians honour Antigonus and Demetrius as divine saviours (theoi soteres).
  • Upon becoming ruler of Epirus, Phyrrhus allies himself with his brother-in-law, Demetrius Poliorcetes, son of Antigonus.

Sicily[edit]

  • The tyrant of Syracuse, Agathocles is forced to return to Syracuse to deal with growing unrest in his Sicilian dominions. Those of Agathocles' army that remain behind in Carthage are soon destroyed.
  • The Carthaginian general Hamilcar fails to take Syracuse and is captured and killed.
  • The city of Segesta in Sicily is destroyed by Agathocles.

China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Philosophy[edit]

  • Epicureanism, a system of philosophy based upon the teachings of Epicurus, is founded (approximate date).

306 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Cyprus[edit]

Syria[edit]

  • Antigonus proclaims himself king of Asia Minor and northern Syria thus commencing the Antigonid dynasty. Antigonus appoints Demetrius Poliorcetes king and co-regent.

Sicily[edit]

  • A peace agreement is reached between Syracuse and Carthage. The peace restricts Carthaginian power in Sicily to the area west of the Halycus (Platani) River. This agreement allows the tyrant of Syracuse, Agathocles, to strengthen his rule over the Greek cities of Sicily.

Egypt[edit]

  • Antigonus tries to follow up his victory in Cyprus by invading Egypt with a large army and a formidable fleet. But Ptolemy successfully holds the frontier against him. However, the year's events mean that Ptolemy no longer engages in overseas expeditions against Antigonus.

Thrace[edit]

305 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

Syria[edit]

  • Antigonus I Monophthalmus sends his son Demetrius to conquer Rhodes, which has refused him armed support against Ptolemy. He shows ingenuity in devising new siege engines in his unsuccessful attempt to reduce the city. Among his creations are a battering ram 60 metres long and requiring 1,000 men to operate it and a wheeled siege tower named "Helepolis" (or "Taker of Cities") which stands 40 metres tall and 20 metres wide and weighs 180 tons. This siege of Rhodes earns Demetrius the title Poliorcetes ("the City Besieger").

Roman Republic[edit]

304 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • The siege of Rhodes ends after a year as Demetrius Poliorcetes meets with obstinate resistance from the citizens of Rhodes who are supported by Ptolemy (thereby earning Ptolemy the title of Soter (Saviour)). Antigonus then concludes a peace treaty and an alliance with the island state, guaranteeing it autonomy and neutrality in his conflicts with Ptolemy.[1]
  • Cassander invades Attica and besieges Athens. Demetrius Poliorcetes drives Cassander out of central Greece and liberates Athens. In return, the Athenians bestow on him a new religious honour, synnaos ("having the same temple") of the temple of the goddess Athena.

Roman Republic[edit]

  • The second Samnite war formally ends with a peace agreement in which the Samnites obtain peace on terms that are severe but not as crushing as those agreed by the Romans with the Etruscans four years earlier. Under the peace, Rome gains no territory, but the Samnites renounce their hegemony over Campania. Rome is also successful in ending the revolts amongst the tribes surrounding Roman territory.[1]

Sicily[edit]

India[edit]

303 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

Greece[edit]

Italy[edit]

302 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Asia Minor[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • Antigonus' son Demetrius Poliorcetes attacks Cassander's forces in Thessaly. Cassander loses his possessions south of Thessaly to Demetrius. Antigonus and Demetrius crown their success by renewing the pan-Hellenic league. Ambassadors from all the Hellenic states (with the exception of Sparta, Messenia and Thessaly) meet at Corinth to elect Antigonus and Demetrius protectors of the new league.
  • As Antigonus is finding his enemies closing in on him, a truce is made and the gains by Demetrius have to be abandoned. Demetrius reaches Ephesus to support his father.
  • Pyrrhus is dethroned as King of Epirus by an uprising and joins Demetrius while in exile.

301 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Asia Minor[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

  • The southern part of Syria is occupied by Ptolemy.

300 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

Egypt[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

India[edit]

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]

  • In Pella (in Macedonia), the artist Gnosis makes a mosaic floor decoration called Stag Hunt and even signs it with "Gnosis made it". It is today preserved at the Archaeological museum in Pella.


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Dupuy, R. Ernest; Dupuy, Trevor N. (1986). The Encyclopedia of Military History. New York: Harper & Row. p. 54. ISBN 0-06-181235-8.