30 Arietis Bb

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30 Arietis Bb
Extrasolar planet List of extrasolar planets
Parent star
Star 30 Arietis B
Constellation Aries
Right ascension (α) 02h 36m 57.74s[1]
Declination (δ) +24° 38′ 53.0″[1]
Apparent magnitude (mV) 7.09
Distance 133 ± 3[1] ly
(41 ± 1[1] pc)
Spectral type F6V
Mass (m) 1.13 ± 0.08 M
Radius (r) 1.13 ± 0.13 R
Temperature (T) 6424 ± 180 K
Metallicity [Fe/H] 0.07 ± 0.2
Age 0.91 ± 0.03 Gyr
Orbital elements
Semimajor axis (a) 0.995 ± 0.012 AU
(148.9 ± 1.8 Gm)
Periastron (q) 0.708 AU
(105.9 Gm)
Apastron (Q) 1.283 AU
(191.9 Gm)
Eccentricity (e) 0.289 ± 0.092
Orbital period (P) 335.1 ± 2.5 d
(0.917 ± 0.007 y)
Orbital speed (υ) 32.3 km/s
Argument of
periastron
(ω) 307 ± 18°
Time of periastron (T0) 2454538 ± 20 JD
Semi-amplitude (K) 270 m/s
Physical characteristics
Minimum mass (m sin i) 9.88 ± 0.94 MJ
Temperature (T) 300 K
Discovery information
Discovery date November 27, 2009
Discoverer(s) Guenther et al.
Discovery method Radial velocity
Discovery site Karl Schwarzschild Observatory
Discovery status Published
Database references
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data
SIMBAD data

30 Arietis Bb (sometimes abbreviated 30 Ari Bb) is an extrasolar planet which orbits the F-type main sequence star 30 Arietis B, located approximately 129 light years away in the constellation Aries. This planet has minimum mass nearly 10 times that of Jupiter. Because inclination is not known, its true mass is unknown. Meanwhile, this planet orbits only 0.005 AU (or 700,000 km) closer to the star than Earth to the Sun, but its orbital eccentricity is much higher compared to Earth. At periastron, the planet’s closest distance to the star is 0.708 AU, which is slightly closer to the star than Venus to the Sun. At apastron, the planet’s farthest distance to the star is 1.283 AU, which is more than half-way between the orbits of Earth and Mars.[2]

This gas giant planet was discovered on Friday, November 27, 2009 by using precise radial velocity method from echelle spectrograph installed in Alfred-Jensch telescope in Karl Schwarzschild Observatory.

References[edit]

Coordinates: Sky map 02h 36m 57.7405s, +24° 38′ 53.027″