30 Seconds (TV series)

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:30 Seconds
Intertitle for 30 Seconds
Intertitle for 30 Seconds
Genre Comedy
Created by Tim Bullock
Justin Drape
Scott Nowell
Written by Tim Bullock
Justin Drape
Scott Nowell
Andrew Knight
Directed by Shawn Seet
Starring Peter O'Brien
Joel Tobeck
Gyton Grantley
Stephen Curry
Jenna Lind
Country of origin Australia
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 6
Production
Executive producer(s) Andrew Denton (Zapruder’s Other Films)
Running time 30 minutes (including commercials)
Broadcast
Original channel The Comedy Channel
Original run 7 September 2009 – 12 October 2009
External links
Website

:30 Seconds is an Australian comedy series produced for The Comedy Channel which satirises Australian advertising companies and advertising industry. The name of the show comes from the advertising slots on television that are normally 30 seconds long. The show has had many guest appearances from famous Australians such as Claudia Karvan, Peter Heliar, Bridie Carter, Matthew Newton and Guy Pearce.

Plot[edit]

The show revolves around a fictitious advertising agency, BND which is a global advertising network, with 61 offices worldwide. The show takes place in one of the Australian offices.

Lazzi[edit]

:30 Seconds occasionally has parts closely resembling a lazzi. This occurs sporadically throughout the show when Martin Manning sees a product. The product that Martin sees becomes centerpiece, while a culmination of the product in Martin's eyes, and how the product could be advertised. For example, the first use in the show occurs in the first scene, when Martin first looks at an Orange Juice container. Suddenly the packet animates and a stereotypical advertising voice over sounds saying: "Now with added goodatives". The scene returns to normal after this brief lazzi, and the scene continues on.[1]

References to popular culture[edit]

Martin Manning uses a white iPhone in all episodes.

Episode three mentions McDonald's, the television show The Jetsons and professional athletes Stephanie Rice, Maria Sharapova, Mitchell Johnson. A white Nintendo DS Lite is played by Martin's son, while Martin owns a Uniden home phone and a laptop from the MacBook family. Matt Shirvington is also mentioned, and has a cameo near the end of the episode.

Cast[edit]

Episodes[edit]

# Title Ratings[note 1] Original air date
1 "Drink Rexponsibly" 38,000 (20th)[2] September 7, 2009 (2009-09-07)
2 "Be The Tool" September 14, 2009 (2009-09-14)
BND's masculinity is put to the test when briefed on two campaigns, however the largely male creative department is having trouble penetrating anything as Martin and Sumo wrestle over a female staff member.
3 "Good Clown Bad Clown" September 21, 2009 (2009-09-21)
Bob's Burgers are worried about a new government report linking fast food and childhood obesity. BND's ingenious response hits problems when the Bobo Clown clashes with effeminate Cuban burger stylist Raoul.
4 "Invisible Fault Lines" September 28, 2009 (2009-09-28)
At 25, Sophie Marsh, the face of Láfinité Rejuvenale is too old. BND need to find a new model and a new campaign for the famous anti-ageing brand.
5 "Twenty One Today" October 5, 2009 (2009-10-05)
Martin's career flashes before his eyes as he plummets from 3rd to 21st in the Campaign Brief creative rankings, while Daiyonda are in a spin as their cars are voted 'worst on emissions'
6 "A Matter of Trust" October 12, 2009 (2009-10-12)
A new business prospect presents a conflict of interest between a prospective client and BND's founding client; Brooker has big plans for the agency while Martin wrestles with a large overseas job offer.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Ratings are the overall national viewers; numbers in brackets indicate weekly ratings position for Australian subscription television rankings.

References[edit]

  1. ^ :30 Seconds, Episode 1
  2. ^ "Top 100 Pay Television Programs: Week 37, 2009 (06/09/2009–12/09/2009)" (PDF) (Press release). Seven Network Research. 2009-09-13. Retrieved 2009-09-15. 

External links[edit]