30 Urania

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30 Urania
30Urania (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 30 Urania based on its light curve.
Discovery[1]
Discovered by J. R. Hind
Discovery date July 22, 1854
Designations
Pronunciation /jʊˈrniə/ ew-RAY-nee-ə
Named after Urania
Alternative names 1948 JK
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch June 14, 2006 (JD 2453900.5)
Aphelion 398.817 Gm (2.666 AU)
Perihelion 309.338 Gm (2.068 AU)
Semi-major axis 354.077 Gm (2.367 AU)
Eccentricity 0.126
Orbital period 1,330.017 d (3.64 a)
Average orbital speed 19.28 km/s
Mean anomaly 196.549°
Inclination 2.097°
Longitude of ascending node 307.820°
Argument of perihelion 86.560°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 100.2 ± 6.8 km (IRAS)[2]
94.48 ± 5.37[3] km
Mass (1.74 ± 0.49) × 1018[3] kg
Mean density 3.92 ± 1.29[3] g/cm3
Equatorial surface gravity 0.0280? m/s²
Escape velocity 0.0529? km/s
Rotation period 0.57025 d (13.686 h)[4]
Albedo 0.1714 (geometric)[2]
Temperature ~177 K
Spectral type S[2]
Apparent magnitude 9.36 (brightest)
Absolute magnitude (H) 7.53[2]

30 Urania is a large main-belt asteroid that was discovered by English astronomer John Russell Hind on July 22, 1854.[1] It was his last asteroid discovery. This object is named after Urania, the Greek Muse of astronomy. Initial orbital elements for 30 Urania were published by Wilhelm Günther, an assistant at Breslau Observatory.[5]

Based upon its spectrum, this is classified as a stony S-type asteroid.[6] During 2000, speckle interferometry measurements from the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo in the Canary Islands were used to measure the apparent size and shape of 30 Urania. This gave cross-sectional dimensions equivalent to an ellipse with a length of 111 km and a width of 89 km, for a ratio of 0.80.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Numbered Minor Planets 1–5000", Discovery Circumstances (IAU Minor Planet center), retrieved 2013-04-07. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Yeomans, Donald K., "30 Urania", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  3. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73: 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  4. ^ "EAR Derived Lightcurve Parameters, version 8", Planetary Data System Asteroid/Dust Archive (NASA), retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  5. ^ Gunther, W. (December 2012), "Elements and ephemeris of (30) Urania", Astronomical Journal 4 (85): 103, Bibcode:1855AJ......4..103G, doi:10.1086/100505.  See Table 1.
  6. ^ DeMeo, Francesca E. et al. (July 2009), "An extension of the Bus asteroid taxonomy into the near-infrared", Icarus 202 (1): 160–180, Bibcode:2009Icar..202..160D, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.005, retrieved 2013-04-08.  See appendix A.
  7. ^ Cellino, A. et al. (April 2003), "Speckle interferometry observations of asteroids at TNG", Icarus 162 (2): 278–284, Bibcode:2003Icar..162..278C, doi:10.1016/S0019-1035(03)00006-X. 

External links[edit]