31st Air Defense Artillery Brigade (United States)

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31st Air Defense Artillery Brigade
31ADABdeSSI.svg
Shoulder sleeve insignia
Active 1918 – 46 1960's – 79 1988 – present
Country United States
Branch United States Army
Type Air defense artillery
Size Brigade
Part of 32nd Army Air & Missile Defense Command
Garrison/HQ Fort Sill
Motto "Ready and Vigilant"
Commanders
Current
commander
COL Michael T. Morrissey
Insignia
Distinctive unit insignia 31ADABdeDUI.png

The 31st Air Defense Artillery Brigade is an air defense artillery brigade of the United States Army based at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

Organization[edit]

History[edit]

Unit History (from the 31st ADA homepage):[1]
"The 31st Air Defense Artillery Brigade was constituted on 1 January 1918 in the National Army as Headquarters, 31st Heavy Artillery Brigade, Coast Artillery. Rapidly transitioning into World War I, the Brigade earned four battle streamers for participation in the campaigns Aisne-Marne, Oise-Aisne, Meuse-Argonne, and Champagne 1918. The unit was demobilized at Fort Lewis, Washington on 30 June 1921. In 1942, the brigade reorganized and was redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 31st Anti-Aircraft Artillery Brigade as part of the Coastal Air Defense stationed on the West Coast. The brigade was later deployed to the European Theater where it participated in and earned three more battle streamers for campaigns in Rome-Arno, Southern France, and the Rhineland. On 30 June 1946, the Brigade was deactivated at Laned-Sebold, Germany.Following World War II, the brigade underwent a series of activations and deactivations, reorganizations, and deployments. In response to the Cuban Missile Crisis, the brigade formed with nine Hercules and Hawk battalions defending Southern Florida from attack by Cuba and the Soviet Union. On 30 September 1979, the brigade was deactivated at Homestead Air Force Base, Florida. On 1 April 1988, the 31st Air Defense Brigade was officially activated at Fort Hood, Texas to support III Corps."

External links[edit]

References[edit]