32nd Chess Olympiad

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Official logo of the Olympiad

The 32nd Chess Olympiad, organized by FIDE and comprising an open[1] and a women's tournament, took place between September 15 and October 2, 1996, in Yerevan, Armenia. Both tournament sections were officiated by international arbiter Alesha Khachatrian of Armenia.

The Russian team won their third consecutive title, captained by PCA world champion Kasparov. Once again, due to a dispute with the national federation, FIDE champion Anatoly Karpov was not present. Ukraine, led by Ivanchuk, took the silver, and the United States returned to the medal ranks for the first time since the fall of the Iron Curtain, beating England by half a point on tie break - somewhat ironically, half of the US team were born in Eastern Europe.

In addition to the overall medal winners, the teams were divided into seeding groups, with the top finishers in each group receiving special prizes.

Open event[edit]

The open division was contested by 114 teams representing 111 nations plus Armenia "B" and "C" as well as the International Braille Chess Association. Mali were signed up but didn't show up and were disqualified. Due to an odd number of participants, the hosts were allowed to field an additional third squad, but when team Yemen arrived after the second round, the number became odd again. However, Afghanistan set a new Olympic record by not showing up until round 8 and once again brought the total number of teams an even one.

The time control for each game permitted each player 2 hours to make the first 40 of his or her moves, then an additional 1 hour to make the next 20 moves. In the event of a draw, the tie-break was decided by 1. The Buchholz system; and 2. Match points.

Open event
# Country Players Average
rating
Points Buchholz
1  Russia Kasparov, Kramnik, Dreev, Svidler, Bareev, Rublevsky 2714 38½
2  Ukraine Ivanchuk, Malaniuk, Romanyshyn, Novikov, Onyschuk, Savchenko 2633 35
3  United States Gulko, Yermolinsky, De Firmian, Kaidanov, Benjamin, Christiansen 2595 34 448.0
4  England Short, Adams, Speelman, Sadler, Hodgson, Conquest 2655 34 447.5
5  Armenia Akopian, Vaganian, Lputian, Minasian, Anastasian, Petrosian 2593 33½ 452.0
6  Spain Shirov, Illescas, Magem, Garcia, San Segundo, Izeta 2605 33½ 451.5
7 Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina Sokolov, Nikolić, Kurajica, Dizdarević, Kelecević, Sinanović 2584 33½ 439.5
8 Georgia (country) Georgia Azmaiparashvili, Giorgadze, Sturua, Zaichik, Janjgava, Supatashvili 2590 33 446.0
9  Bulgaria Topalov, K. Georgiev, Spasov, Dimitrov, V. Georgiev, Chatalbashev 2619 33 443.0
10  Germany Yusupov, Hübner, Dautov, Lobron, Hickl, Lutz 2619 33 440.0

Individual medals[edit]

Best game[edit]

The 'Best game' prize went to Zurab Sturua (Georgia) - Rolando Kutirov (Macedonia) from round 3.

Women's results[edit]

The women's division was contested by 74 teams representing 72 nations plus Armenia "B" and the International Braille Chess Association. The time control for each game permitted each player 2 hours to make the first 40 of his or her moves, then an additional 1 hour to make the next 20 moves. In the event of a draw, the tie-break was decided by 1. The Buchholz system; and 2. Match points.

The Georgian team, led by one former world champion (Chiburdanidze), won their third consecutive title. China, led by another former world champion (Xie Jun), took the silver, and Russia the bronze. Newly crowned champion Susan Polgar did not take part in the event for her new country, so a second-rate US team finished as low as 35th.

# Country Players Average
rating
Points Buchholz
1 Georgia (country) Georgia Chiburdanidze, Ioseliani, Arakhamia-Grant, Gurieli 2498 30
2  China Xie Jun, Zhu Chen, Wang Lei, Wang Pin 2425 28½ 347.0
3  Russia Galliamova, Matveeva, Prudnikova, Zaitseva 2443 28½ 345.5
4  Ukraine Gaponenko, Litinskaya, Sedina, Zhukova 2343 26½
5  Hungary Polgár, Mádl, Medvegy, Lakos 2387 26
6  Romania Foişor, Corina Peptan, Radu-Cosma, Olǎraşu 2355 25½
7  Israel Klinova, Segal, Tsifanskaya, Pitam 2310 25
8  Kazakhstan Sakhatova, Uskova, Girkiyan-Klink, Sergeeva 2305 24½ 340.5
9  Poland Brustman, Bobrowska, Dworakowska, Zielińska 2330 24½ 339.5
10  England Lalic, Hunt, Sheldon, Bellin 2303 24 346.0

Individual medals[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although commonly referred to as the men's division, this section is open to both male and female players.