337th Aeronautical Systems Group

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337th Aeronautical Systems Group Air Force Materiel Command.png
325th Fighter Group - Emblem.png
Emblem of the 337th Fighter Group
Active 1942-1944, 1955-1966, 2005-2008
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Type Systems Development
Part of Air Force Materiel Command
Aeronautical Systems Center
460th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron Convair F-102A-90-CO Delta Dagger 57-838, 337th Fighter Group, Portland International Airport, Oregon, April 1963

The 337th Aeronautical Systems Group is an inactive United States Air Force unit. Its last assignment was with Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC), Aeronautical Systems Center at Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio. It was inactivated in 2008.

History[edit]

World War II[edit]

The 337th Fighter Group was activated at Morris Field, North Carolina with the 98th,[1] 303d,[2] and 304th Fighter Squadrons[3] assigned.[4] It received its initial cadre from the 20th Fighter Group.[5] The group operated as replacement training unit, flying primarily P-40 Warhawks and P-51 Mustangs, but also other fighter aircraft.[4] In February 1943, the group added a fourth squadron, the 440th Fighter Squadron[6] The group maintained a split operation with squadrons operating from both Sarasota Army Air Field and Pinellas Army Air Field.[1][2][3][6] The group and its components were disbanded in 1944[4] in a major reorganization of the Army Air Forces (AAF) in which all units not programmed to be transferred overseas were replaced by AAF Base Units to free up manpower for overseas deployment. The 336th AAF Base Unit (Replacement Training Unit, Fighter) assumed the mission of the group at Sarasota,[7] while the 341st AAF Base Unit (Replacement Training Unit, Fighter) took over the group's equipment at Pinellas.[8]

Cold War[edit]

The group was reconstituted, redesignated as the 337th Fighter Group (Air Defense) and activated in 1955[4] as part of Air Defense Command's Project Arrow, which was designed to bring back on the active list the fighter units which had compiled memorable records in the two world wars.[9] It assumed the personnel and equipment of the inactivating 503d Air Defense Group,[10] while its 460th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron (FIS), which moved to Portland International Airport from McGhee-Tyson Airport,[11] took over the F-89 Scorpion aircraft and personnel of the 503d's 497th FIS, which moved to Geiger Field, Washington.[12] The group also served as the host organization for regular USAF units at Portland International Airport and was assigned a number of support organizations to perform this mission.[13][14][15] In May 1958, the group converted from F-89Ds to F-102 Delta Dagger aircraft.[16] It operated interceptors to provide active air defense in the 25th NORAD Region area of responsibility[17] until it was inactivated[4] in a phaseout of interceptors due to budget reductions in the spring of 1966.

Modern Era[edit]

In 2005, AFMC formed the Training Aircraft Systems Group as part of the AFMC Transformation initiative, which replaced traditional project offices with wings, groups, and squadrons. In 2006 most of these new organizations were consolidated with World War II units and given the numbers of the older units. As a result of this, the group became the 337th Aeronautical Systems Group.[18] In 2007, the group's Foreign Military Sales (FMS) team oversaw the effort to provide the Iraqi Air Force with Cessna 172 training aircraft to resume operations[19] and also sought vendors for Counterinsurgency (COIN) aircraft for Iraq.[20] The group was inactivated in 2008 and its subordinate units were transferred to the 77th Aeronautical Systems Wing's 877th Aeronautical Systems Group.[21]

Lineage[edit]

327th Fighter Group

  • Constituted as 337th Fighter Group (Single Engine) on 16 July 1942
Activated on 23 July 1942
Disbanded on 1 May 1944
  • Reconstituted and redesignated 337th Fighter Group (Air Defense), on 20 June 1955
Activated on 18 August 1955[22]
Inactivated on 25 March 1966
  • Redesignated 337th Tactical Fighter Group on 31 July 1985 (not active)[23]
Consolidated with the Training Aircraft Systems Group on 23 June 2006[24]

Training Aircraft Systems Group

  • Constituted as the Training Aircraft Systems Group on 23 November 2004[25]
Activated on 18 January 2005[25]
Consolidated with the 337th Tactical Fighter Group on 23 June 2006[24]
  • Redesignated 337th Aeronautical Systems Group on 14 July 2006[18]
Inactivated on 30 June 2008[21]

Assignments[edit]

Components[edit]

Systems Units

  • T-1 Systems Squadron (later 662d Aeronautical Systems Squadron), 18 January 2005 - 30 June 2008[25]
  • T-38 Systems Squadron (later 663d Aeronautical Systems Squadron), 18 January 2005 - 30 June 2008[25]
  • Joint Primary Aircraft Training Systems Squadron (later 664th Aeronautical Systems Squadron), 18 January 2005 - 30 June 2008[25]

Stations[edit]

  • Morris Field, North Carolina, 23 July 1942
  • Drew Field, Florida, 7 August 1942[4]
  • Sarasota Army Air Field, Florida, ca. 3 January 1943-1 May 1944
  • Portland International Airport, Oregon, 18 August 1955-30 March 1966
  • Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, 18 January 2005 - 30 June 2008[25]

Aircraft[edit]

Awards[edit]

8 June 1960 - 30 April 1962[29]
1 May 1962 - 31 July 1963[29]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  1. ^ a b Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1982) [1969]. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. pp. 326–327. ISBN 0-405-12194-6. 
  2. ^ a b c Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 367 (this squadron is not related to the current reserve 303d Fighter Squadron, which was a troop carrier unit during World War II)
  3. ^ a b c d Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 368
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1983) [1961]. Air Force Combat Units of World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. pp. 215–216. ISBN 0-912799-02-1. 
  5. ^ Abstract, History of 337th Fighter Group, Jul 1942-Oct 1943 (accessed 31 May 2012)
  6. ^ a b Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 545
  7. ^ Abstract, History, Sarasota AAF, May 1944 (accessed 31 May 2012)
  8. ^ Abstract, History of Pinellas AAF, May-Jul 1944 (accessed 31 May 2012)
  9. ^ Buss, Lydus H.(ed), Sturm, Thomas A., Volan, Denys, and McMullen, Richard F., History of Continental Air Defense Command and Air Defense Command July to December 1955, Directorate of Historical Services, Air Defense Command, Ent AFB, CO, 1956., p.6
  10. ^ Cornett, Lloyd H; Johnson, Mildred W (1980). A Handbook of Aerospace Defense Organization, 1946 - 1980. Peterson AFB, CO: Office of History, Aerospace Defense Center. p. 81. 
  11. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, pp. 567-568
  12. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p.599
  13. ^ a b Cornett & Johnson, p. 146
  14. ^ a b See Abstract, History of 337th USAF Infirmary, Jul-Dec 1955 (accessed 31 May 2012)
  15. ^ a b See Abstract, History of 337th Air Base Squadron, Jan 1958-Dec 1959 (accessed 31 May 2012)
  16. ^ Cornett & Johnson, p. 129
  17. ^ Abstract, Final History of 337th Fighter Group (accessed 31 May 2012)
  18. ^ a b Air Force Organizational Status Change Report, July 2006, Historical Division, Air Force Historical Research Agency
  19. ^ Press Release: Wright-Patt Plays a Part in Training Future Iraqi Pilots (accessed 11 June 2012)
  20. ^ FedBizOpps.gov Solicitation, Iraq Counterinsurgency (COIN) Aircraft (accessed 11 June 2012)
  21. ^ a b Air Force Organizational Status Change Report, June 2008, Historical Division, Air Force Historical Research Agency
  22. ^ lineage and station information prior to 1957 is at Maurer, Combat Units, pp. 215-216
  23. ^ DAF/MPM Letter 648q, 31 July 1985, Subject: Reconstitution, Redesignation, and Consolidation of Selected Air Force Organizations
  24. ^ a b Air Force Organizational Status Change Report, June 2006, Historical Division, Air Force Historical Research Agency
  25. ^ a b c d e f g Air Force Organizational Status Change Report, January 2005, Historical Division, Air Force Historical Research Agency
  26. ^ a b Cornett & Johnson, p.79
  27. ^ Abstract, History of 337th USAF Hospital, Jan-Jun 1964 (accessed 31 May 2012)
  28. ^ Cornett & Johnson, p. 139
  29. ^ a b AF Pamphlet 900-2, Unit Decorations, Awards and Campaign Participation Credits, Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC, 15 Jun 71 (Part 1) [1] (Part 2), p. 327

External links[edit]