33d Network Warfare Squadron

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33d Network Warfare Squadron
31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron Lockheed P-38J-20-LO Lightning (F-5E) 44-23450 Sexy Sail.jpg
31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron Lockheed F-5E Lightning "Sexy Sall" over Saint-Dizier Airfield.
Active 1943-1945; 1947-1949; 1985-1996; 2000-Present
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Type Network Warfare
Role Computer Network Defense
Part of AFSPC/24 AF/67 NWW
Garrison/HQ Lackland AFB, Texas
Nickname "The Mighty Griffins"
Motto COMMAND'S BEST
Engagements European Theater of Operations
Decorations Distinguished Unit Citation
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award
Insignia
33d Network Warfare Squadron emblem 33d Information Operations Squadron.PNG
Ninth Air Force fuselage code[1] BV

The United States Air Force (USAF)'s 33d Network Warfare Squadron (33 NWS) is a network warfare unit located at Lackland AFB, Texas.

The squadron was established as the 70th Reconnaissance Squadron during World War II and saw combat in the European Theater of Operations as the 31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, where it earned a Distinguished Unit Citation for its efforts in preparing for the Normandy Invasion. After briefly serving as part of the occupation forces in Germany it was inactivated in late 1945.

The squadron was activated again in the reserves as the 31st Reconnaissance Squadron in 1947. It was redesignated the 33d Reconnaissance Squadron (apparently to avoid confusion with the regular USAF 31st Reconnaissance Squadron). The squadron never reached full strength or received aircraft before inactivation when Continental Air Command reorganized its reserve units under the wing base organization plan.

In 1985 Electronic Security Command established the 6933d Electronic Security Squadron in Panama. The squadron participated in Operation Just Cause. In 1993, as the USAF eliminated Major Command controlled (MAJCON) four digit organizations, the 6933d was consolidated with the 33d as a single unit, the 33d Intelligence Squadron. The squadron was inactivated as the USAF departed Panama, but was activated once again as an information operations and network warfare unit.

Mission[edit]

The 33 NWS's mission, as the USAF’s lone network warfare squadron dedicated to Air Force network defense, is to execute all aspects of AF network defense as an element of the distributed AF Network Operations Center. The squadron monitors, secures, and protects Air Force and Central Command global networks, ensures network integrity, reliability, availability, and confidentiality and responds to hostile network threats and attacks.

History[edit]

31st Photo Recce Squadron Emblem approved 30 May 1944[2]

The squadron was established in mid-1943 as the 70th Reconnaissance Squadron, a tactical reconnaissance squadron. Shortly afterwards the squadron converted to a photographic reconnaissance unit and was redesignated the 31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron. It trained in the southeast United States as an element of Third Air Force.[2]

The squadron deployed to the European Theater of Operations (ETO) in the spring of 1944. It was initially engaged in aerial photography of the French English Channel coastline and Low Countries. The squadron flew F-4, F-5, and F-6 reconnaissance aircraft supporting Allied buildup for the Normandy Invasion. It furnished vitally important photographs of the beaches and defenses on the Continent for briefing and training of assault troops. The unit's low-level missions under difficult weather and combat conditions led to the awarding of the Distinguished Unit Citation for the period of 6 through 20 May 1944.[2] After D-Day, the squadron moved to France and performed battlefield tactical reconnaissance[2] primarily for the Third Army, but also for First and Ninth Armies during the Northern France Campaign in 1944. The squadron moved into Germany in the spring of 1945 continuing to supply battlefield reconnaissance for Army ground forces.[2]

After the German surrender the 31st remained as part of the United States Air Forces in Europe occupation forces, gradually drawing down during the fall of 1945 until inactivated.[2]

The squadron was activated again in the reserves as the 31st Reconnaissance Squadron in 1947. It was redesignated the 33d Reconnaissance Squadron (apparently to avoid confusion with the regular USAF 31st Reconnaissance Squadron). The squadron never reached full strength or received aircraft before inactivation when Continental Air Command reorganized its reserve units under the wing base organization plan.[2]

The 6933d Electronic Security Squadron was activated by Electronic Security Command in Panama at Howard Air Force Base on 1 October 1985. Starting in December 1989 and continuing into the end of the operation in 1990 the squadron conducted signals intelligence and other intelligence missions and supported Operation Just Cause in 1989-1990.[3] By 1993 the USAF was eliminating its Major Command controlled (MAJCON) (four digit) units. To preserve the heritage of the 6933d, the squadron was consolidated with the 33d Reconnaissance Squadron as the 33d Intelligence Squadron. It continued to provide intelligence support in Panama until inactivating on 30 June 1996.

The squadron was again activated on 1 August 2000 as the 33d Information Operations Squadron at Kelly Annex, Lackland AFB, Texas. It conducted information operations and after 5 July 2005, network defense operations.

Lineage[edit]

33d Reconnaissance Squadron

  • Constituted as the 70th Reconnaissance Squadron (Fighter) on 15 June 1943
Activated on 20 June 1943.
Redesignated 31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron on 11 August 1943
Inactivated on 22 Nov 1945
  • Redesignated 31st Reconnaissance Squadron (Night Photographic) on 5 September 1947
Activated in the reserve on 13 November 1947
Redesignated 33d Reconnaissance Squadron (Night Photographic) on 25 November 1947
Inactivated on 27 June 1949[4]
  • Consolidated on 1 October 1993 with the 6933d Electronic Security Squadron as the 33d Intelligence Squadron

33d Network Warfare Squadron

  • Designated as the 6933d Electronic Security Squadron and activated on 1 October 1985
  • Consolidated on 1 October 1993 with the 33d Reconnaissance Squadron as the 33d Intelligence Squadron
Inactivated 30 June 1996
  • Redesignated 33d Information Operations Squadron
Activated on 1 August 2000
Redesignated 33d Network Warfare Squadron on 26 July 2007

Assignments[edit]

Stations[edit]

Aircraft[edit]


Awards and Campaigns[edit]

Award streamer Award Dates Notes
Streamer PUC Army.PNG Distinguished Unit Citation 6 May 1944 - 20 May 1944 France 31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[2]
AFOUA with Valor.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award w/Combat "V" Device 1 June 2002 - 30 May 2003 33d Information Operations Squadron
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 July 1986 - 30 June 1988 6933d Electronic Security Squadron
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 20 December 1989 - 14 February 1991 6933d Electronic Security Squadron
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 15 February 1991 - 31 December 1991 6933d Electronic Security Squadron
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 October 1993 - 30 September 1994 33d Intelligence Squadron
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 October 1994 - 30 September 1995 33d Intelligence Squadron
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 August 2000 - 30 September 2000 33d Information Operations Squadron
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 June 2003 - 31 May 2005 33d Information Operations Squadron

Manual campaign table

Campaign Streamer Campaign Dates Notes
Streamer EAMEC.PNG Air Offensive, Europe 31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[2]
Streamer EAMEC.PNG Normandy 31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[2]
Streamer EAMEC.PNG Northern France 31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[2]
Streamer EAMEC.PNG Rhineland 31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[2]
Streamer EAMEC.PNG Ardennes-Alsace 31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[2]
Streamer EAMEC.PNG Central Europe 31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[2]
Streamer EAMEC.PNG Air Combat, EAME Theater 31st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[2]
Streamer AFE.PNG Panama 6933d Electronic Security Squadron

Equipment Operated[edit]

  • Various computer networking equipment (2000–Present)
  • Various intelligence-gathering equipment (1985–1996)

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Watkins, Robert (2008). Battle Colors. Vol III Insignia and Markings of the Ninth Air Force In World War II. Atglen, PA: Shiffer Publishing Ltd. pp. 130–131. ISBN 978-0-7643-2938-8. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1982) [1969]. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. pp. 154–155. ISBN 0-405-12194-6. LCCN 70605402. OCLC 72556. 
  3. ^ Brief History from USAFSS to AIA - A Legacy More Than Half a Century Continues (retrieved July 23, 2013)
  4. ^ a b c Lineage, assignments, and stations through 1949 and aircraft, Maurer, Combat Squadrons, pp. 154-155
  5. ^ Station number in Anderson, Capt. Barry (1985). Army Air Forces Stations: A Guide to the Stations Where U.S. Army Air Forces Personnel Served in the United Kingdom During World War II. Maxwell AFB, AL: Research Division, USAF Historical Research Center. Retrieved July 7, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Station Number in Johnson, 1st Lt. David C. (1988). U.S. Army Air Forces Continental Airfields (ETO) D-Day to V-E Day. Maxwell AFB, AL: Research Division, USAF Historical Research Center. 

Bibliography[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

External links[edit]