349 Dembowska

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349 Dembowska
349Dembowska (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 349 Dembowska based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Auguste Charlois
Discovery date December 9, 1892
Designations
Named after
Ercole Dembowski
1892 T
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics
Epoch 30 January 2005 (JD 2453400.5)
Aphelion 475.88 Gm (3.181 AU)
Perihelion 399.743 Gm (2.672 AU)
437.812 Gm (2.927 AU)
Eccentricity 0.087
1828.662 d (5.00 a)
17.41 km/s
198.148°
Inclination 8.256°
32.5°
347.171°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions ~140 km[1][2]
145.23 ± 17.21[3] km
Mass (3.58 ± 1.03) × 1018[3] kg
Mean density
2.23 ± 1.01[3] g/cm3
4.701207 ± 0.000058 h[1][2]
Albedo 0.384 (Bright)[1][4]
Temperature ~148 K
Spectral type
R[1][2]
5.93[1]

Asteroid 349 Dembowska is named in honor of the Baron Hercules Dembowski, an Italian astronomer who made significant contributions to research on double and multiple stars. The asteroid was discovered over a century ago on December 9, 1892, by the French astronomer Auguste Charlois while working at the observatory in Nice, France.[5]

Located just prior to the prominent 7:3 resonance with Jupiter, 349 Dembowska is among the larger asteroids in the main belt with an estimated diameter of ~140 km.[2] It has a rotational period of 4.7012 hours,[2] and is classified as an R-type asteroid due to the presence of strong absorption lines in olivine and pyroxene with little or no metals. It may have undergone partial melting/differentiation.[6] 349 Dembowska has an unusually high albedo of 0.384. Of the asteroids with a diameter greater than 75 km, only 4 Vesta has a higher known albedo.[4]

Dembowska and 16 Psyche have orbits that repeat themselves almost exactly every five years in respect to their position to the Sun and Earth.

In 1988 a search for satellites or dust orbiting this asteroid was performed using the UH88 telescope at the Mauna Kea Observatories, but the effort came up empty.[7] There was one occultation on October 31, 2006,[8] and on December 5, 2007.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 349 Dembowska (1892 T)". Retrieved 2008-05-02. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Majaess D. J., Tanner J., Savoy J., Sampson B. (2008). 349 Dembowska: A Minor Study of its Shape and Parameters, Minor Planet Bulletin, 35, 88
  3. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012). "Density of asteroids". Planetary and Space Science 73: 98–118. arXiv:1203.4336. Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  4. ^ a b "Asteroid Albedos (JPG)". JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine. Retrieved 2008-05-02. 
  5. ^ Charlois, A.; Benennung von kleinen Planeten, Astronomische Nachrichten, Vol. 132, No. 3155, p. 175
  6. ^ Expanding the Spectral Compositional Information of Asteroid 349 Dembowska
  7. ^ Gradie, J.; Flynn, L. (March 1988). "A Search for Satellites and Dust Belts Around Asteroids: Negative Results". Abstracts of the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference 19: 405–406. Bibcode:1988LPI....19..405G. 
  8. ^ "OCCULTATION BY (349) DEMBOWSKA - 2006 OCT 31". Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand. 
  9. ^ "349 Dembowska – UCAC2 42014653 (Occultation 2007-12-05 22:43UT)". Retrieved 2007-09-22. 

External links[edit]