34 Circe

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34 Circe
34Circe (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 34 Circe based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by J. Chacornac
Discovery date April 6, 1855
Designations
Named after
Circe
1965 JL
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch November 4, 2013 (JD 2456600.5)
Aphelion 2.967739 AU
Perihelion 2.406230 AU
2.686984 AU
Eccentricity 0.1045
4.40 a (1607.332 d)
18.12 km/s
39.80474°
Inclination 5.498°
184.44157°
330.2330°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 113.02 ± 4.90[2] km
Mass (3.66 ± 0.03) × 1018[2] kg
Mean density
4.83 ± 0.63[2] g/cm3
~0.0317 m/s²
~0.0600 km/s
0.5063 d (12.15 h) [1]
Albedo 0.0541 [1]
Temperature ~172 K
Spectral type
C
8.51

34 Circe (/ˈsɜrs/ SUR-see) is a large, very dark main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by French astronomer J. Chacornac on April 6, 1855, and named after Circe, a goddess in Greek mythology.

Photometric observations of this asteroid made during 2007 at the Organ Mesa Observatory in Las Cruces, New Mexico gave an asymmetrical bimodal light curve with a period of 12.176 ± 0.002 hours and a brightness variation of 0.17 ± 0.02 in magnitude.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Yeomans, Donald K., "34 Circe", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 2013-12-21. 
  2. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73: 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ Pilcher, Frederick (September 2008), "Period Determinations for 26 Proserpina, 34 Circe 74 Galatea, 143 Adria, 272 Antonia, 419 Aurelia, and 557 Violetta", Bulletin of the Minor Planets Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers 35 (3): 135–138, Bibcode:2008MPBu...35..135P.