354 Eleonora

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354 Eleonora
354Eleonora (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 354 Eleonora based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Auguste Charlois
Discovery date January 17, 1893
Designations
Alternative names 1893 A
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 30 January 2005 (JD 2453400.5)
Aphelion 465.848 Gm (3.114 AU)
Perihelion 371.553 Gm (2.484 AU)
Semi-major axis 418.701 Gm (2.799 AU)
Eccentricity 0.113
Orbital period 1,710.242 d (4.68 a)
Average orbital speed 17.8 km/s
Mean anomaly 317.966°
Inclination 18.385°
Longitude of ascending node 140.51°
Argument of perihelion 6.994°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 154.34 ± 5.65[2] km
Mass (7.18 ± 2.57) × 1018[2] kg
Mean density 3.73 ± 1.39[2] g/cm3
Spectral type S
Absolute magnitude (H) 6.44

354 Eleonora is a large, stony main-belt asteroid that was discovered by the French astronomer Auguste Charlois on January 17, 1893, in Nice.[3]

Photometric observations of this asteroid gave a light curve with a period of 13.623 hours. The data was used to construct a model for the asteroid, revealing it to be a regular-shaped object, spinning about a pole with ecliptic coordinates (β, λ) = (+20°, 356°), although this is with an accuracy of only ±10°. The ratio of the major to minor axes lengths is roughly equal to 1.2.[4] It is classified as an S-type asteroid and has an estimated size of 154.34 km.[2] The spectrum of 354 Eleonora reveals the strong presence of the mineral Olivine, a relatively rarity in the asteroid belt.[5]

During favorable oppositions, such as in 1968 and 2010, Eleonora can reach an apparent magnitude of +9.31.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yeomans, Donald K., "354 Eleonora", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 2013-04-07. 
  2. ^ a b c d Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73: 98-118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ "Numbered Minor Planets 1–5000", Discovery Circumstances (IAU Minor Planet center), retrieved 2013-04-07. 
  4. ^ Kaasalainen, M. et al. (October 2002), "Models of Twenty Asteroids from Photometric Data", Icarus 159 (2): 369–395, Bibcode:2002Icar..159..369K, doi:10.1006/icar.2002.6907. 
  5. ^ Burbine, T. H. et al. (July 2000), "The Nature of Olivine Asteroids", Meteoritics & Planetary Science 35: A35, Bibcode:2000M&PSA..35R..35B. 

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