3554 Amun

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3554 Amun
Amun Sept 9 2012.PNG
Orbit diagram of asteroid Amun with location as of September 9, 2012
Discovery
Discovered by Carolyn and
Eugene Shoemaker
Discovery date March 4, 1986
Designations
Named after
Amun
1986 EB
Minor planet category Aten asteroid,[1]
Venus-crosser asteroid
Orbital characteristics
Epoch July 14, 2004 (JD 2453200.5)
Aphelion 186.532 Gm (1.247 AU)
Perihelion 104.807 Gm (0.701 AU)
145.669 Gm (0.974 AU)
Eccentricity 0.281
350.964 d (0.96 a)
29.58 km/s
196.415°
Inclination 23.363°
358.680°
359.368°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 2.48 km[1]
Mass ~1.6×1013 kg
Mean density
2 ? g/cm³
? m/s²
? km/s
2.53 hr[1]
Albedo 0.1284[1]
Temperature ~280 K
Spectral type
M-type asteroid
15.82[1]

3554 Amun is an M-type Aten asteroid (meaning it crosses Earth's orbit) and a Venus-crosser. It was discovered on 4 March 1986 by Carolyn and Eugene Shoemaker at Mount Palomar Observatory. Its estimated diameter is 2.48 kilometers, making it one of the smallest known M-type asteroids. Amun was the fifth Aten asteroid to be numbered.

Amun was once considered metallic, based on its M-type spectrum. In Mining the Sky, planetary scientist John S. Lewis calculated the value of 3554 Amun at $20 trillion.[2]

(6178) 1986 DA is another M-type near-Earth asteroid with lower inclination that is actually metallic.

Amun passes closest to Venus, and in 1964, 2034, and 2103 comes within 10 Gm of it.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 3554 Amun (1986 EB)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 2014-02-19 last obs (arc=27.9 yr). Retrieved 2014-02-23.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  2. ^ Book Review: Mining the Sky

External links[edit]