35th Academy Awards

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35th Academy Awards
Date April 8, 1963
Site Santa Monica Civic Auditorium
Host Frank Sinatra
Producer Arthur Freed
Director Richard Dunlap
Highlights
Best Picture Lawrence of Arabia
Most awards Lawrence of Arabia (7)
Most nominations Lawrence of Arabia (10)
TV in the United States
Network ABC
 < 34th Academy Awards 36th > 

The 35th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1962, were held on April 8, 1963 at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California, hosted by Frank Sinatra.

Awards[edit]

Winners are listed first and highlighted with boldface[1]

Best Picture Best Director
Best Actor Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor Best Supporting Actress
Best Original Screenplay Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Foreign Language Film
Best Documentary Feature Best Documentary Short
Best Live Action Short Best Animated Short
Best Original Score Best Adaptation or Treatment Score
Best Original Song Best Sound Recording
Best Art Direction, Black and White Best Art Direction, Color
Best Cinematography, Black and White Best Cinematography, Color
Best Costume Design, Black and White Best Costume Design, Color
Best Film Editing Best Visual Effects

Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award[edit]

Trivia[edit]

  • "Host Frank Sinatra nearly missed the show because he forgot his parking sticker and was turned away from the arrivals area by security guards. He had to park his own car elsewhere and run to the auditorium, barely arriving in time."[1]
  • Joan Crawford was infuriated when Bette Davis was nominated for an Oscar and she was overlooked. She contacted the Best Actress nominees who were unable to attend the ceremonies and offered to accept the award on their behalf should they win. When Anne Bancroft was declared the winner for The Miracle Worker, Crawford triumphantly pushed her way past Davis and swept onstage to pick up the trophy. Davis later commented, "It would have meant a million more dollars to our film if I had won. Joan was thrilled I hadn't."[2]
  • Mutiny on the Bounty became the first remake of a previous Best Picture winner to be nominated for Best Picture. (As of 2014, this milestone has not been repeated.)

Presenters[edit]

Performers[edit]

Multiple nominations and awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

A^ : During pre-production on Lawrence of Arabia, producer Sam Spiegel and director David Lean were unhappy with Michael Wilson's original screenplay, so Spiegel asked playwright Robert Bolt to rewrite the script, as Spiegel wanted to get the film rights of Bolt's play A Man for All Seasons. Bolt found the script lacking in good dialogue and also character depth. He essentially wrote the whole script, using T.E. Lawrence's book, The Seven Pillars of Wisdom, as his starting point. While Bolt rewrote the whole script, he still retained the characterization of all of the characters found in Wilson's original script. It was decided that Bolt will be credited as the sole writer of Lawrence of Arabia and not Wilson, because he was blacklisted at the time. The nomination for Wilson was granted on 26 September 1995 by the Academy Board of Directors, after research at the WGA found that the then blacklisted writer shared the screenwriting credit with Bolt.

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "The 35th Academy Awards (1963) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved 2011-08-23. 
  2. ^ Mother Goddam: The Story of the Career of Bette Davis by Whitney Stine, with a running commentary by Bette Davis, Hawthorn Books, Inc., 1974, ISBN 0-8015-5184-6, pp. 296-297

External links[edit]