37th Legislative District (New Jersey)

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New Jersey's 37th Legislative district
Census Bureau map of New Jersey's 37th Legislative District.gif
New Jersey State Senator Loretta Weinberg
New Jersey General Assemblymembers Valerie Huttle and Gordon M. Johnson
Demographics 52.6% White
16.1% Black/African American
0.4% Native American
18.6% Asian
0.0% Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
12.2% Other race
24.0% Hispanic
Population 221,026
Voting-age population 171,970

New Jersey's 37th Legislative District is one of 40 in the state, covering the Bergen County municipalities of Alpine, Bogota, Cresskill, Englewood, Englewood Cliffs, Fort Lee, Hackensack, Leonia, Northvale, Palisades Park, Rockleigh, Teaneck and Tenafly.[1] As of the 2010 United States Census, the district had a population of 221,026.[2] In the 2011 apportionment following the 2010 Census, Bergenfield (moved to District 38), Maywood (to District 38), Ridgefield Park (to District 36) and Rochelle Park (to District 38) were removed and Alpine, Cresskill, Fort Lee, Northvale and Rockleigh were added.[3]

Demographic characteristics[edit]

African-American residents account for 16.6% of the district's population, mostly in Englewood, Hackensack, and Teaneck. The 37th has the fourth-highest percentage of Asian residents of all districts statewide, accounting for 13.4% of the population.[4][5]

Political representation[edit]

The district is represented in the New Jersey Senate by Loretta Weinberg (D, Teaneck) and in the New Jersey General Assembly by Valerie Huttle (D, Englewood) and Gordon M. Johnson (D, Englewood).[6]

Election history[edit]

As of 2010, registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by a 2-1 ratio in the district.[5]

In February 1993, Byron Baer announced that he would run for the seat in the New Jersey Sneate being vacated by Matthew Feldman.[7] Together with Assembly running mates Loretta Weinberg and Ken Zisa, who was on the ballot for Baer's former Assembly seat, Baer won election to the Senate.[8]

Loretta Weinberg was chosen by Democratic committee members in March 1992 to fill the seat vacated in the Assembly by D. Bennett Mazur, who had resigned due to illness.[9]

The Bergen County Democratic Organization caucused in September 2005, to select a candidate to replace Byron Baer in the Senate. In balloting to replace Baer on an interim basis, Weinberg lost by a 114-110 margin to Zisa. In a separate vote, by a 112-111 margin, Zisa was selected over Weinberg to be the party's candidate on the November ballot.[10] Weinberg filed suit to challenger the exclusion of five ballots and in October 2005 a ruling in Weinberg's favor was issued, giving Weinberg the interim position and the ballot post.[11]

With Weinberg's victory, Bergen County Freeholder Valerie Huttle and Englewood Mayor Michael Wildes both announced their candidacy for Weinberg's Assembly seat, with Huttle outpolling Wildes in another special convention by a 121-96 margin.[12]

Session State Senate[13] Assembly[14]
1976-1977 Matthew Feldman Byron Baer Albert Burstein
1978-1979 Matthew Feldman Byron Baer Albert Burstein
1980-1981 Matthew Feldman Byron Baer Albert Burstein
1982-1983 Matthew Feldman Byron Baer D. Bennett Mazur
1984-1985 Matthew Feldman Byron Baer D. Bennett Mazur
1986-1987 Matthew Feldman Byron Baer D. Bennett Mazur
1988-1989 Matthew Feldman Byron Baer D. Bennett Mazur
1990-1991 Matthew Feldman Byron Baer D. Bennett Mazur
1992-1993 Matthew Feldman Byron Baer D. Bennett Mazur
1994-1995 Byron Baer Loretta Weinberg Ken Zisa
1996-1997 Byron Baer Loretta Weinberg Ken Zisa
1998-1999 Byron Baer Loretta Weinberg Ken Zisa
2000-2001 Byron Baer Loretta Weinberg Ken Zisa
2002-2003 Byron Baer Gordon M. Johnson Loretta Weinberg
2004-2005 Byron Baer Gordon M. Johnson Loretta Weinberg
2006-2007 Loretta Weinberg Valerie Huttle Gordon M. Johnson
2008-2009 Loretta Weinberg Valerie Huttle Gordon M. Johnson
2010-2011 Loretta Weinberg Valerie Huttle Gordon M. Johnson
2012-2013 Loretta Weinberg Valerie Huttle Gordon M. Johnson

References[edit]

  1. ^ Districts by Number, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 20, 2012.
  2. ^ Dp-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 - 2010 Demographic Profile Data , United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 20, 2012.
  3. ^ Municipalities Index, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 20, 2012.
  4. ^ District 37 Profile, Rutgers University. Accessed June 15, 2010.
  5. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book. Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. p. 156. 
  6. ^ Legislative Roster: 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 20, 2012.
  7. ^ Edelman, Susan. "BAER ANNOUNCES RUN TO SUCCEED FELDMAN -- ENGLEWOOD MAN IS 1ST DEMOCRAT IN RACE", The Record (Bergen County), February 25, 1993. Accessed June 16, 2010.
  8. ^ Markowitz, Michael. "VOTERS IN 37TH DISTRICT RALLY TO DEMOCRATS", The New York Times, November 3, 1993. Accessed June 16, 2010.
  9. ^ Staff. "TEANECK COUNCILWOMAN TAKES OVER MAZUR'S ASSEMBLY SEAT", The Record (Bergen County), March 17, 1992. Accessed June 15, 2010.
  10. ^ Jones, Richard Lezin. "After Democratic Squabble, Corzine Ally Loses Bid to Fill State Senate Seat", The New York Times, September 16, 2005. Accessed June 15, 2010.
  11. ^ Fallon, Scott. "Judge's ruling clears Weinberg's way to Senate", The Record (Bergen County), October 4, 2005. Accessed June 15, 2010.
  12. ^ Fallon, Scott. Huttle gets Democrats' nod to run for Assembly in 37th -- Freeholder defeats Englewood mayor in party tussle", The Record (Bergen County), October 7, 2005. Accessed June 15, 2010. "Freeholder Valerie Huttle will succeed Loretta Weinberg as a Democratic Assembly candidate in the 37th District after defeating Englewood Mayor Michael Wildes in a county committee election Thursday night. Huttle won, 121-96, to be the party's nominee on the Nov. 8 ballot. She will fill the rest of the Assembly term after Weinberg resigns."
  13. ^ NJ Senate 37 - History, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed June 15, 2010.
  14. ^ NJ Assembly 37 - History, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed June 15, 2010.