380s BC

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Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries: 5th century BC4th century BC3rd century BC
Decades: 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC380s BC370s BC 360s BC 350s BC
Years: 389 BC 388 BC 387 BC 386 BC 385 BC 384 BC 383 BC 382 BC 381 BC 380 BC
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EstablishmentsDisestablishments

380s BC: events by year[edit]

Contents: 389 BC 388 BC 387 BC 386 BC 385 BC 384 BC 383 BC 382 BC 381 BC 380 BC

389 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • A Spartan expeditionary force under King Agesilaus II crosses the Gulf of Corinth to attack Acarnania, an ally of the anti-Spartan coalition. Agesilaus is eventually able to draw them into a pitched battle, in which the Acarnanians are routed.
  • The Athenian general, Thrasybulus, leads a force of triremes to levy tribute from cities around the Aegean and support Rhodes, where a democratic government is struggling against Sparta. On this campaign, Thrasybulus captures Byzantium, imposes a duty on ships passing through the Hellespont, and collects tribute from many of the islands of the Aegean.

China[edit]

  • Wu Qi, the Prime Minister of the State of Chu, enacts his first series of political, municipal, and martial reforms. Wu Qi gains the ire and distrust of Chu officials and aristocratic elite who are against his crusades to sweep up corruption in the state and limit their power. He is eventually assassinated in 381 BC at the funeral of King Diao of Chu, although his assassins are executed shortly after by the newly enthroned King Su of Chu.
  • This is the latest possible date for the compilation of the historical text Zuo Zhuan, attributed to a blind historian known as Zuo Qiuming.

388 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • King Agesipolis I leads a Spartan army against Argos. Since no Argive army challenges him, he plunders the countryside for a time, and then, after receiving several unfavorable omens, returns to Sparta.
  • The Athenian general, Thrasybulus, sails to Lesbos, where, with the support of the Mytileneans, he defeats the Spartan forces on the island and wins over a number of cities. While still on Lesbos, however, Thrasybulus is killed by raiders from the city of Aspendus where his financial exactions has made him unpopular.
  • Concerned about the revival of Athenian imperialist ambitions, the Persian King Artaxerxes II and King Agesilaus II of Sparta enter into an alliance. Sparta also seeks and gains the support of Dionysius I of Syracuse.

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]

387 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • Antalcidas, commander of the Spartan navy, actively assists Persia against Athens. After escaping from the Athenian blockade at Abydos, he attacks and defeats a small Athenian force, then joins his fleet with a supporting fleet sent from Syracuse. With this force, which is soon further augmented with ships supplied by the Persian satraps of the region, he sails to the Hellespont, where he is in a position to cut off the trade routes that bring grain to Athens.
  • The Persians, unnerved by some of Athens' actions, including supporting King Evagoras of Cyprus and Pharaoh Hakor of Egypt (both of whom are at war with Persia), decide that their policy of weakening Sparta by supporting its enemies is no longer wise. So Antalcidas enters into negotiations with the Persian satrap Tiribazus and reaches an agreement under which the Persians will enter into the war on the Spartan side if the allies refuse to make peace.
  • With Antalcidas' Spartan fleet in control of the Hellespont, Sparta deprives Athens of her Bosporus trade and tolls. The Athenians, mindful of being in a similarly serious situation as when defeated in the Peloponnesian War less than two decades before and facing Persian intervention on Sparta's side, are thereby ready to make peace.
  • With the support of the Persian King Artaxerxes II, King Agesilaus II of Sparta concludes "the King's Peace" (or the Peace of Antalcidas, after the Spartan envoy and commander) with Greek allied forces in a manner favourable to Sparta. Under the Peace, all the Asiatic mainland and Cyprus remain under Persian control, Lemnos, Imbros, and Scyros remain Athenian dependencies, and all the other Greek states are to receive autonomy. By the King's Peace, the Persians become key players in Greek politics.
  • Under the threat of Spartan intervention, Thebes disbands its league, and Argos and Corinth end their shared government. Corinth, deprived of its strong ally, is incorporated back into Sparta's Peloponnesian League. After eight years of fighting, the Corinthian War is at an end.
  • Plato founded the Platonic Academy in Athens, where he taught Aristotle until 347 BC.

Sicily[edit]

  • With the aid of the Lucanians, Dionysius I of Syracuse devastates the territories of Thurii, Crotone, and Locri in mainland Italy. When Rhegium falls, Dionysius becomes the chief power in Greek Southern Italy. He then turns his attention to the Adriatic.
  • Plato is forced by Dionysius to leave Syracuse after having exercised the right of free speech too broadly. Plato returns to Athens, outside which he founds a school.

Roman Republic[edit]

386 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Persian Empire[edit]

Sicily[edit]

China[edit]

385 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

By topic[edit]

Education[edit]

Astronomy[edit]

384 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

383 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • King Amyntas III of Macedon, forms a temporary alliance with the Chalcidian League. Sparta, whose policy is to keep Greeks disunited, sends an expedition northwards to disrupt the Chalcidian League, a confederation of cities of the Chalcidice peninsula, east of Macedonia.
  • The Spartan commander Phoebidas, who is passing through Boeotia on campaign, takes advantage of civil strife within Thebes to gain entrance to the city for his troops. Once inside, he seizes the Cadmeia (the citadel of Thebes), and forces the anti-Spartan party to flee the city. The government of Thebes is placed in the hands of the pro-Spartan party, backed by a Spartan garrison based in the Cadmeia. Many of the previous leaders of Thebes are driven into exile. Epaminondas, although associated with the anti-Spartan faction, is allowed to remain.

By topic[edit]

Astronomy[edit]

Religion[edit]

382 BC[edit]

  • Pelopidas, a Theban general and statesman, flees to Athens and takes the lead in attempts to liberate Thebes from Spartan control.
  • In punishment for his unauthorized action in the previous year of taking over Thebes, Phoebidas is relieved of his command, but the Spartans continue to hold Thebes. The Spartan king Agesilaus II argues against punishing Phoebidas, on the grounds that his actions had benefited Sparta, and this was the only standard against which he ought to be judged.

381 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Persian Empire[edit]

  • The Persian generals Tiribazus and Orontes invade Cyprus, with an army far larger than any King Evagoras of Cyprus could raise. However, Evagoras manages to cut off this force from being resupplied, and the starving troops rebel. However, the war then turns in the Persians' favour when Evagoras' fleet is destroyed at the Battle of Citium (Larnaca, Cyprus). Evagoras flees to Salamis, where he manages to conclude a peace which allows him to remain nominally king of Salamis, though in reality he is a vassal of the Persian king.

Greece[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

  • The district of Tusculum is pacified after a revolt against Rome and conquered. After an expression of complete submission to Rome, Tusculum becomes the first "municipium cum suffragio", and thenceforth the city continues to hold the rank of a municipium.

380 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Persian empire[edit]

Egypt[edit]

Greece[edit]

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]

  • What some historians call the Rich style in Greece comes to an end.


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]