381 Myrrha

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381 Myrrha
Discovery
Discovered by Auguste Charlois
Discovery date January 10, 1894
Designations
Named after
Myrrha
1894 AS
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 30 January 2005 (JD 2453400.5)
Aphelion 527.45 Gm (3.526 AU)
Perihelion 435.617 Gm (2.912 AU)
481.534 Gm (3.219 AU)
Eccentricity 0.095
2109.318 d (5.77 a)
16.6 km/s
0.901°
Inclination 12.527°
125.354°
137.241°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 147.2×126.6 km
123.41 ± 6.30[2] km
Mass (9.18 ± 0.80) × 1018[2] kg
Mean density
9.32 ± 1.64[2] g/cm3
Spectral type
C
8.25

381 Myrrha is a very large main-belt asteroid that was discovered by French astronomer Auguste Charlois on January 10, 1894, in Nice.[3] It is classified as a C-type asteroid and is probably composed of carbonaceous material.

Photometric observations of this asteroid at the Oakley Observatory in Terre Haute, Indiana during 2006 gave a light curve with a period of 6.572 ± 0.002 hours and a brightness variation of 0.34 ± 0.05 in magnitude.[4]

10µ radiometric data collected from Kitt Peak in 1975 gave a diameter estimate of 126 km.[5] The occultation of AlhenaGeminorum) by Myrrha was observed in Japan and China on January 13, 1991, allowing the size and shape of Myrrha to be clarified.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yeomans, Donald K., 381 Myrrha, JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 2013-03-30. 
  2. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), Density of asteroids, Planetary and Space Science 73: 98-118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ Numbered Minor Planets 1–5000, Discovery Circumstances (IAU Minor Planet center), retrieved 2013-04-07. 
  4. ^ Ditteon, Richard; Hawkins, Scot (September 2007), Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Oakley Observatory - October-November 2006, Bulletin of the Minor Planets Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers 34 (3): 59–64, Bibcode:2007MPBu...34...59D. 
  5. ^ Morrison, D.; Chapman, C. R. (March 1976), Radiometric diameters for an additional 22 asteroids, Astrophysical Journal 204: 934–939, Bibcode:2008mgm..conf.2594S, doi:10.1142/9789812834300_0469. 

External links[edit]