40 Point Plan

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40 Point Plan
40 Point Plan Poster.jpg
Poster
Directed by EW
Produced by EW
Merrill Likes
Gerald Williams
Daniel Smith
Andrew Hecker
Tisha Rivera
Dave Nemeth
Wayne Olsen
Mike Adams
Karl Vance
Mona Parsa
Screenplay by EW
Story by EW
Starring Dave Nemeth
Tisha Rivera
Joe Comino
Christianne Christensen
Music by EW (band)
Cinematography Andrew Hecker
Edited by Andrew Hecker
Production
  company
40 Point Productions
Distributed by 40 Point Productions
Release date(s)
  • July 20, 2012 (2012-07-20)
Running time 75 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $60,000 (estimated)

40 Point Plan is a 2012 American film written and directed by Eric W Williams.[1] It claims to be the first solutionmentary, a portmanteau of solution and documentary. Another portmanteau to describe this would be future-mentary. The film is self distributed by 40 Point Productions and is scheduled to open through most popular video on demand services on July 20, 2012 including the film's Official Website.

Plot[edit]

Set in 2017, TV news-magazine host David Potrero (Dave Nemeth) looks back at the major changes in America and the rest of 153 allied nations after the implementation of the 40 Point Plan five years earlier. Throughout the movie, various (future) newscasters "read into reality" stories that reveal an alternative world enjoying the effects of plan. While set in the future, attention to real names makes the plan seem entirely possible.

At the core of the plan is the 2012 formation of the National Employment Corporation of America, led by a who's who of famous celebrity billionaires—a dream team of executives. NECA solves the unemployment problem by hiring millions of American workers to use an expanded version of real technological advances to build housing, provide water, grow food and sell its many American made products in its own superstores throughout the country and around the world.

What separates NECA from your average corporation is what it does with the distribution of its profits. One third of the profits go to the organization's charitable efforts, particularly the health care system. Essentially this is a complete alternative to the contemporary partisan political battles dividing America, providing real solutions that avoid the arguing.

Many of the social ills affecting society are solved, not by the government, but by private enterprise.[2]

The story is brought to life by interviews with people affected by NECA's development, including a NECA executive, Dr. Kelly Rivers (Tisha Rivera), a doctor in the medical program, Dr. Joe DelGado (Joe Comino), a food skytower owner Nathan Kuthbert (Nathan Kotzer) and a formerly homeless "success story" Valerie Sinclair (Christianne Christiensen).

Reactions[edit]

Advocates of some of the suggested solutions from the movie have supported the plan. Among those concepts are monolithic domes,[3] vertical farms,[4] and universal education.[5]

Reviews[edit]

Let’s hope that someone tries, and moves us just a little bit toward such a world.

—James Maynard, Camp Campaign[2]

Media as Education. Soon to win a Nobel Prize.

—Wayne Clingman, Big Talk Radio[6]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]