41st Rescue Squadron

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41st Rescue Squadron
41st Rescue Squadron.jpg
41st Rescue Squadron Patch
Active 14 November 1952 - 18 March 1960
29 December 1961 - 30 September 1987
1 March 1989 - Present
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
Type Search and Rescue
Part of Air Combat Command
23d Air Force
347th Rescue Group
Garrison/HQ Moody Air Force Base
Decorations Outstanding Unit ribbon.svg AFOUA
A Pave Hawk of the 41 RQS landing during a training exercise at the Playas Training and Research Center in April 2010

The 41st Rescue Squadron (41 RQS) is part of the 347th Rescue Group at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. It operates HH-60 Pave Hawk aircraft conducting search and rescue missions.

Mission[edit]

The 41 RQS maintains combat-ready status as an HH-60G combat search and rescue (CSAR) squadron. This squadron specializes in combat rescue of downed aircrew behind enemy lines, using night vision goggles (NVG), low-level formation, air refueling, weapons employment, medevac, casevac, CAS (close air support) and survivor recovery. Air Force rescue is one of the few USAF assets that directly support combat units of all military branches, including allied combat units, through means other than munition drops, or intel. Members assigned to this squadron rapidly mobilize, deploy and employ to provide combat and peacetime search and rescue in support of U.S. national security interests and the NASA space shuttle. During forward combat operations the 41st, like other USAF helicopter Rescue assets, assume an Alert posture. With an average response time of 4 minutes from call to airborne, the "Pedros" (deployed callsign) are considered by many to be the fastest rescue asset in the United States inventory.[1]

History[edit]

The 41st has flown search and rescue missions from, 1952–1960, 1962–1987, and since 1989. It also recovered high-altitude atmospheric-sampling devices from, 1962–1987. Beginning in Mar 1989, the squadron has provided prelaunch security and safety surveillance of NASA launches and recovery or medical evacuation for Space Shuttle crewmembers.[2]

Operations[edit]

Lineage[2][edit]

  • 41st Air Rescue Squadron (1952–1966)
  • 41st Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron (1966–1989)
  • 41st Air Rescue Squadron (1989–1993)
  • 41st Rescue Squadron (1993–Present)

Assignments[2][edit]

Bases stationed[2][edit]

Aircraft operated[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

See also[edit]