460s BC

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Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries: 6th century BC5th century BC4th century BC
Decades: 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC460s BC450s BC 440s BC 430s BC
Years: 469 BC 468 BC 467 BC 466 BC 465 BC 464 BC 463 BC 462 BC 461 BC 460 BC
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EstablishmentsDisestablishments

460s BC: events by year[edit]

Contents: 469 BC 468 BC 467 BC 466 BC 465 BC 464 BC 463 BC 462 BC 461 BC 460 BC

469 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • The island of Naxos wishes to secede from the Delian League, but is blockaded by Athens and forced to surrender. Naxos becomes a tribute-paying member of the Delian League. This action is considered high-handed and resented by the other Greek city states.
  • Themistocles, after being exiled from Athens, makes his way across the Aegean to Magnesia, an inland Ionian city under Persian rule.

468 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Literature[edit]

467 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Sicily[edit]

By topic[edit]

Literature[edit]

Astronomy[edit]

466 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

Italy[edit]

465 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Persian Empire[edit]

  • King Xerxes I of the Persian Empire, together with his eldest son, is murdered by one of his Ministers, Artabanus the Hyrcanian. The Persian general, Megabyzus, is thought to have been one of the conspirators in the assassination.
  • Artabanus gains control of the Achaemenid state for several months. However, he is betrayed by Megabyzus and is killed by Xerxes' son, Artaxerxes.

Greece[edit]

  • Thasos revolts from the Delian League. The revolt arises from rivalry over trade with the Thracian hinterland and, in particular, over the ownership of a gold mine. Athens under Kimon lays siege to Thasos after the Athenian fleet defeats the Thasos fleet.

By topic[edit]

Arts[edit]

464 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • Sparta suffers the effects of a severe earthquake leading to a large loss of life.
  • When the Messenian helots (serfs) revolt against their Spartan masters following the severe earthquake, King Archidamus II organises the defence of Sparta. The helots fortify themselves at Mount Ithome.

Persian Empire[edit]

  • Egypt seizes the opportunity created by the murder of Xerxes I to revolt against Persia. The revolt is led by Inaros, a Libyan, who gains control of the Delta region and is aided by the Athenians.
  • Artaxerxes I succeeds Xerxes as king of the Persian empire.

463 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Rome[edit]

  • The Senate and People of Rome appoint Gaius Aemilius Mamercus dictator.

Greece[edit]

  • In Athens, the democratic statesman Ephialtes and the young Pericles attempt to get the oligarchic Kimon ostracized for allegedly receiving bribes. Kimon is charged by Pericles and other democratic politicians with having been bribed not to attack the King of Macedonia (who may have been suspected of covertly helping the Thasian rebels). Though Kimon is acquitted, his influence on the Athenian people is waning.
  • Themistocles, who is in exile, approaches the Persian King Artaxerxes I seeking Persian help in regaining power in Athens. Artaxerxes is unwilling to help him, but instead gives him the satrapy of Magnesia.
  • After a two year siege, Thasos falls to the Athenians under Kimon who compels the Thasians to destroy their walls, surrender their ships, pay an indemnity and an annual contribution to Athens.

462 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • The Spartans try to conquer the mountain stronghold of Mt Ithome in Messenia, where a large force of rebellious helots have taken refuge. They ask their allies from the Persian Wars, including the Athenians, to help.
  • Kimon seeks the support of Athens' citizens to providing help to Sparta. Although Ephialtes maintains that Sparta is Athens' rival for power and should be left to fend for itself, Kimon's view prevails. Kimon then leads 4,000 hoplites to Mount Ithome.
  • After an attempt to storm Mt. Ithome fails, the Spartans start to distrust the Athenians over concerns that they may take the side of the helots. Retaining their other allies, the Spartans sent Kimon and his men home. This insulting rebuff causes the collapse of Kimon's popularity at Athens. Outrage over the dismissal swings Athenian opinion towards Ephialtes' views.
  • Ephialtes passes a law in the Athenian ecclesia, which reforms the Areopagus, limiting its power to judging cases of homicide and religious crimes. He considers the Areopagus to be the centre of conservatism and Ephialtes' victory is seen as a defeat for the conservatives and the members of the oligarchy.
  • Argos, taking advantage of Spartan preoccupation with the revolt of its helots, finally conquers Mycenae. The inhabitants of the town are dispersed, with some finding their way into Macedonia.
  • Pericles starts to effectively be the leader of Athens.

By topic[edit]

Philosophy[edit]

461 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • In Athens, Ephialtes and Pericles finally get agreement to the ostracism of Kimon, who had become unpopular for his unsuccessful pro-Spartan policy.
  • Ephialtes, with the support of Pericles, reduces the power of the Athenian Council of Areopagus (filled with ex-archons and so a stronghold of oligarchy) and transfers them to the people, i.e. the Council of Five Hundred, the Assembly and the popular law courts. The office of Judge is made a paid position and is recruited by lot from a list to which every citizen can have his name added.
  • Ephialtes is murdered by Aristodicus of Tanagra in Boeotia, who is said to have acted on behalf of members of the Athenian oligarchy.
  • The ostracism of Kimon and the murder of Ephialtes leave Pericles as the most influential orator in Athens.

460 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Persian Empire[edit]

  • Egypt revolts against Persian rule. The Egyptian leader, Inaros, asks Athens for assistance, which is willingly provided as Athens has plans to trade with and colonise Egypt. A force of 200 Athenian triremes, which is campaigning in Cyprus, is immediately ordered to Egypt to render assistance.
  • Achaemenes, Persian satrap (governor) of Egypt, is defeated and slain in a battle at Papremis, on the banks of the Nile River, by Egyptian forces.
  • The construction of the ceremonial complex of Apadana (the audience hall of Darius I and Xerxes I) in Persepolis is completed.

Greece[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Sicily[edit]

  • Ducetius, a Hellenised leader of the Siculi, an ancient people of Sicily, takes advantage of the confusion that follows the collapse of the tyranny in Syracuse and other Sicilian states. With the support of the Syracusan democracy, he drives out the colonists of the former tyrant Hieron from Catana and restores it to its original inhabitants.

By topic[edit]

Arts[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Titchenell, Elsa-Brita (January 1974). "Worlds Aborning". Sunrise. Retrieved 2006-09-22.