471 Papagena

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471 Papagena
471Papagena (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 471 Papagena based on its light curve.
Discovery[1] and designation
Discovered by Max Wolf
Discovery date June 7, 1901
Designations
1901 GN
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch April 10, 2007 (JD 2454200.5)
Aphelion 3.5595 AU (Q)
Perihelion 2.2118 AU (q)
2.8856 AU (a)
Eccentricity 0.2335
4.90 a
83.155° (M)
Inclination 14.985°
84.095°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 134.19 km[1]
124.55 ± 8.77[2] km
Mass (3.05 ± 1.73) × 1018[2] kg
Mean density
3.01 ± 1.82[2] g/cm3
0.1994[1]
S[1]
9.27 to 13.13
6.72[3]
0.147" to 0.041"

471 Papagena is an asteroid that was discovered by German astronomer Max Wolf on June 7, 1901.[1] Its provisional name was 1901 GN.

Papagena comes to a favorable near-opposition apparent magnitude of better than magnitude 9.8 every five years. On September 30, 2010, it will be magnitude 9.68 and will get brighter every five years until December 12, 2035, when this late-to-be-discovered asteroid will be at magnitude 9.28. It is named for a character in Mozart's opera, The Magic Flute.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Yeomans, Donald K., "471 Papagena", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 2013-03-25. 
  2. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73: 98-118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ Warner, Brian D. (December 2007), "Initial Results of a Dedicated H-G Project", Bulletin of the Minor Planets Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers 34: 113–119, Bibcode:2007MPBu...34..113W. 

External links[edit]