47th Infantry Division Bari

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47th Infantry Division Bari
Active 1939 – 1940
Country Italy Regno d'Italia
Kingdom of Italy
Branch Flag of Italy (1860).svgRegio Esercito
Royal Italian Army
Type Infantry
Size Division
Garrison/HQ Bari, Italy
Nickname Bari
Engagements World War II
Commanders
Notable
commanders
General Ernesto Zaccone

The 47th Infantry Division Bari was an infantry division of the Italian Army during World War II. The Bari Division drafted men in Bari and in the Salento and was sent to Albania in preparation for taking part in the Battle of Greece. Supported by a Battalion of the San Marco Regiment it was intended to be used in the assault on the island of Corfu. This was cancelled due to the losses on the mainland. They were later identified as the landing division for the proposed Invasion of Malta, which was also cancelled. They were then sent to Sardinia in April 1943, until the Italian surrender in September 1943.[1]

Commander[edit]

General Ernesto Zaccone[2]

Order of battle[edit]

  • 139. Bari Infantry Regiment
  • 140. Bari Infantry Regiment
  • 47. Artillery Regiment
  • 152. Salentina CCNN Legion
  • 47. Mortar Battalion
  • 47. Anti-Tank Company
  • 47. Signal Company
  • 55. Pioneer Company
  • Medical Section
  • Motor Transport Section
  • Supply Section
  • Carabinieri Section[nb 1][1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ An Italian Infantry Division normally consisted of two Infantry Regiments (three Battalions each), an Artillery Regiment, a Mortar Battalion (two companies), an Anti Tank Company, a Blackshirt Legion of two Battalions was sometimes attached. Each Division had only about 7,000 men, The Infantry and Artillery Regiments contained 1,650 men, the Blackshirt Legion 1,200, each company 150 men.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Marcus Wendal. "Italian Army". Axis History. Retrieved 2009-04-28. 
  2. ^ Enrico Tagliazucchi and Franco Agostini. "Royal Italian Army". Archived from the original on 4 April 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-28. 
  3. ^ Paoletti, p. 170.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Paoletti, Ciro (2008). A Military History of Italy. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 0-275-98505-9.