48 Doris

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48 Doris
Discovery
Discovered by Hermann Mayer Salomon Goldschmidt
Discovery date September 19, 1857
Designations
Pronunciation /ˈdɔərɨs/
 
Minor planet category Main belt
Adjectives Dorian
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 500.093 Gm (3.343 AU)
Perihelion 430.463 Gm (2.877 AU)
465.278 Gm (3.110 AU)
Eccentricity 0.075
2003.453 d (5.49 a)
16.87 km/s
336.191°
Inclination 6.554°
183.754°
257.583°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 278×142km[2]
221.8 ± 7.5 km (IRAS)[1]
Mass 1.7×1019 kg[3][4]
(assumed)[5]
Mean density
2.1 to 3.1 g/cm³
0.0620 m/s²
0.1173 km/s
11.89 h[1]
Albedo 0.062[1][6]
Temperature ~158 K
Spectral type
C[1]
6.90[1]

48 Doris is one of the largest main belt asteroids. It was discovered by Hermann Goldschmidt on September 19, 1857 from his balcony in Paris.

Name[edit]

To find a name for the object, Jacques Babinet of the Academy of Sciences created a shortlist and asked the geologist Élie de Beaumont to make the selection. De Beaumont chose Doris, after an Oceanid in Greek mythology. Since Doris was discovered on the same night as 49 Pales, de Deaumont suggested naming the two "The Twins".[7]

Physical characteristics[edit]

An occultation on March 19, 1981, suggested a diameter of 219±25 km.[8] Observations of an occultation on October 14, 1999, using four well-placed chords, indicate an ellipsoid of 278×142 km and that 48 Doris is an extremely irregularly shaped object.[2]

Conjunction[edit]

Doris will pass within 0.019 AU of Pallas in June 2132.[9]

In popular culture[edit]

48 Doris is a location in the text-based science fiction game Federation 2.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 48 Doris". 2008-06-13 last obs. Retrieved 2008-11-10. 
  2. ^ a b "Occultation of HIP 29126 by (48) Doris - 2001 November 28". Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand. Retrieved 2008-11-30. 
  3. ^ Michalak, G. (2001). "Determination of asteroid masses". Astronomy & Astrophysics 374: 703–711. Bibcode:2001A&A...374..703M. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20010731. Retrieved 2008-11-10. 
  4. ^ (Mass estimate of Doris 0.09 / Mass of Ceres 4.75) * Mass of Ceres 9.43E+20 = 1.786E+19
  5. ^ Michalak2001 assumed masses of perturbing asteroids used in calculations of perturbations of the test asteroids.
  6. ^ Asteroid Data Sets
  7. ^ Lutz D. Schmadel, Dictionary of Minor Planet Names, p.19.
  8. ^ Ludek Vasta, Jan Manek (2005-07-26). "Observed Minor Planet Occultation Events". Asteroidal Occultations (Czech Astronomical Society). Retrieved 2008-12-07. 
  9. ^ "JPL Close-Approach Data: 48 Doris". 2009-08-11 last obs. Retrieved 2010-02-23. 

External links[edit]