49th New Zealand Parliament

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The 49th New Zealand Parliament was elected at the 2008 election. It comprised 122 members, including an overhang of two seats (an increase of one from the 48th Parliament) caused by the Māori Party having won two more electorate seats than its share of the party vote would otherwise have given it. The Parliament served from 2008 until the November 2011 election.

New Zealand uses the Mixed Member Proportional (MMP) system to elect its parliaments. Seventy of the members of the 49th Parliament represented geographical electorates: sixteen in the South Island, 47 in the North Island (one more than for the 48th Parliament) and seven Māori electorates. The remaining 52 (increased from fifty by the overhang) were elected from nationwide party vote candidate lists to realise proportionality.

There were 10 resignations leading to Electoral Commission replacement selections for new list Candidates from four parliamentary parties. Lockwood Smith was the Speaker in the 49th Parliament.

Electorate boundaries for 49th Parliament[edit]

The Representation Commission altered many of the boundaries of New Zealand's parliamentary electorates following the 2006 Census; the large growth in population between censuses lead to significant boundary changes, particularly in Auckland, the area around Christchurch and the central North Island. In May 2007, the Representation Commission announced the boundary changes[1] to take effect for the next general election, with the boundaries finalised in September 2007.

The Commission announced the formation of a new electorate in Greater Auckland, bringing the number of geographical constituencies to 70. The new electorate, originally dubbed "Howick" (after the Auckland suburb), would have included parts of the existing Pakuranga, Manukau East and Clevedon electorates.[1] After Pakuranga electors strongly objected to the proposed changes (which would have seen the inclusion of the population centres Panmure, Point England and Glen Innes into the electorate) the Commission largely reverted proposed changes to the boundaries of the Pakuranga electorate. The Commission opted to alleviate population pressures by moving the Auckland City suburb of Otahuhu into Manukau East. The revised new electorate received the name Botany to reflect its focus on the growing population-centres of Botany DownsDannemora. On paper, Botany counts as a safe National seat.

Even though the number of South Island electorates remains fixed, the decline in the population of electorates south of Christchurch resulted in the boundaries of electorates from Invercargill north to Rakaia shifting northwards. The electorates of Aoraki, Otago, Rakaia and Banks Peninsula all gravitated towards Christchurch. In the process:

Other electorates in the lower South Island increased substantially in size. New Zealand election 2008 electorate results.svg

2008 election results[edit]

The figures below are based on official results[2] A decrease of 7 MPs is shown for "Other Parties" because the New Zealand First Party of Winston Peters did not win an electorate seat or 5% of the party vote, and hence was not allocated any seats in the new Parliament.

e • d  Summary of the 8 November 2008 New Zealand House of Representatives official election results
party votes % of votes seats
% change electorate list total change
National 1,053,398 44.93 +5.83 41 17 58 +10
Labour 796,880 33.99 -7.11 21 22 43 -7
Green 157,613 6.72 +1.42 0 9 9 +3
ACT 85,496 3.65 +2.14 1 4 5 +3
Māori 55,980 2.39 +0.27 5 0 5 +1
Progressive 21,241 0.91 -0.25 1 0 1 0
United Future 20,497 0.87 -1.80 1 0 1 -2
other parties 153,461 6.55 +5.23 0 0 0 -7a
total 2,344,566 100.00 70 52 122 +1b
party informal votes 11,970c
disallowed special votes 19,517c
disallowed ordinary votes 427c
total votes cast 2,376,480
turnout 79.46d -1.46

a The loss of seven seats by 'other parties' shown here compared to the 2005 election result was mostly due to NZ First failing to clear the MMP threshold while two independents, Gordon Copeland and Taito Phillip Field, who had split from their parties since the 2005 election lost their seats.
b The Māori Party gained two overhang seats (increasing parliament's size from 120 to 122 seats) by virtue of gaining more electorate seats than their party vote would have otherwise given them. This was one more overhang seat than in 2005.
c"Party Votes and Turnout by Electorate". Chief Electoral Office, New Zealand Ministry of Justice. Retrieved 2008-11-29. 
dThe turnout is given as a percentage of those enrolled to vote. In New Zealand, enrolment is compulsory, though voting is not. "New Zealand General Election 2008 - Official Results". Elections New Zealand. Retrieved 2008-11-23. 


Members of the 49th New Zealand Parliament[edit]

New Zealand National Party (58)[edit]

Name Electorate Term in office Portfolios & Responsibilities
John Key Helensville 2002
  • Prime Minister
  • Minister of Tourism
  • Minister in Charge of Ministerial Services
  • Minister in Charge of the NZ Security Intelligence Service
  • Minister Responsible for the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB)
  • Leader of the National Party
Bill English Clutha-Southland 1990
  • Deputy Prime Minister
  • Minister of Finance
  • Minister for Infrastructure
  • Deputy Leader of the National Party
Gerry Brownlee Ilam 1996
  • Leader of the House
  • Minister for Economic Development
  • Minister of Energy and Resources
  • Minister of Earthquake Recovery
  • Associate Minister for the Rugby World Cup
  • Deputy Chair of the Privileges Committee
Simon Power Rangitīkei 1999
  • Minister of Justice
  • Minister for State Owned Enterprises
  • Minister of Commerce
  • Minister Responsible for the Law Commission
  • Minister of Consumer Affairs
  • Associate Minister of Finance
  • Deputy Leader of the House
Tony Ryall Bay of Plenty 1990
  • Minister of Health
  • Minister of State Services
Nick Smith Nelson 1990
  • Minister for the Environment
  • Minister for Climate Change Issues
  • Minister for ACC
Judith Collins Papakura 2002
  • Minister of Police
  • Minister of Corrections
  • Minister of Veterans’ Affairs
Anne Tolley East Coast 19992002; 2005
  • Minister of Education
  • Minister Responsible for the Education Review Office
Chris Finlayson 2005
  • Attorney-General
  • Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations
  • Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage
David Carter 1994 byelection
  • Minister of Agriculture
  • Minister for Biosecurity
  • Minister of Forestry
Murray McCully East Coast Bays 1987
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs
  • Minister for Sport and Recreation
  • Minister for the Rugby World Cup
Tim Groser 2005
  • Minister of Trade
  • Associate Minister of Foreign Affairs
  • Associate Minister for Climate Change Issues (International Negotiations)
Wayne Mapp North Shore 1996
  • Minister of Defence
  • Minister of Research, Science and Technology
  • Associate Minister for Economic Development
  • Associate Minister for Tertiary Education
Steven Joyce 2008
  • Minister of Transport
  • Minister for Communications and Information Technology
  • Minister for Tertiary Education
  • Associate Minister of Finance
  • Associate Minister for Infrastructure
Georgina Te Heuheu 1996
  • Minister for Courts
  • Minister of Pacific Island Affairs
  • Minister for Disarmament and Arms Control
  • Associate Minister of Maori Affairs
Paula Bennett Waitakere 2005
  • Minister for Social Development and Employment
  • Minister of Youth Affairs
Phil Heatley Whangarei 1999
  • Minister of Fisheries
  • Minister of Housing
Jonathan Coleman Northcote 2005
  • Minister of Immigration
  • Minister of Broadcasting
  • Associate Minister of Tourism
  • Associate Minister of Health
Kate Wilkinson 2005
  • Minister of Conservation
  • Minister of Labour
  • Minister for Food Safety
  • Associate Minister of Immigration
Hekia Parata 2008
  • Minister of Ethnic Affairs
  • Minister of Women's Affairs
  • Associate Minister of Energy
  • Associate Minister of Community and Voluntary Sector
  • Associate Minister of ACC
Maurice Williamson Pakuranga 1987
  • Minister for Building and Construction
  • Minister of Customs
  • Minister of Statistics
  • Minister for Small Business
  • Minister for Land Information
Nathan Guy Ōtaki 2005
  • Minister of Internal Affairs
  • Minister Responsible for Archives New Zealand
  • Minister Responsible for the National Library
  • Associate Minister of Justice
  • Associate Minister of Transport
Craig Foss Tukituki 2005
  • Minister of Civil Defence
  • Minister of Senior Citizens
  • Minster of Racing
  • Associate Minister for Local Government
  • Associate Minister of Commerce
Lockwood Smith Rodney 1984
  • Speaker of the House
  • Chair of the Business select committee
  • Chair of the Officers of Parliament select committee
  • Chair of the Standing Orders select committee
Eric Roy Invercargill 19932002; 2005
  • Assistant Speaker
Chris Tremain Napier 2005
  • Senior Government Whip
  • Deputy Chair of the Finance and Expenditure select committee
Jo Goodhew Rangitata 2005
  • Junior Government Whip
  • Former Chair of the Social Services select committee
Lindsay Tisch Waikato 1999
  • Deputy Speaker
  • Deputy chair of the Officers of Parliament select committee
Amy Adams Selwyn 2008
  • Chairperson, Electoral Legislation Committee
  • Chair of the Finance and Expenditure Select Committee
Shane Ardern Taranaki-King Country 1998 byelection
  • Chair of the Primary Production select committee
Paul Hutchison Hunua 1999
  • Chair of the Health select committee
Tau Henare 19931999; 2005
  • Chair of the Māori Affairs select committee
  • Deputy Chair Auckland Governance Select Committee
Sandra Goudie Coromandel 2002
  • Chair of the Law and Order select committee
Chris Auchinvole West Coast-Tasman 2005
  • Chair of the Local Government and Environment select committee
David Bennett Hamilton East 2005
  • Chair of the Transport and Industrial Relations select committee
Chester Borrows Whanganui 2005
  • Chair of the Justice and Electoral select committee
John Hayes Wairarapa 2005
  • Chair of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade select committee
Katrina Shanks 2007 –
  • Chair of the Social Services select committee
Jackie Blue 2005
  • Deputy chair of the Transport and Industrial Relations select committee
Jacqui Dean Waitaki 2005
  • Deputy Chair of the Government Administration select committee
  • Deputy Chair of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade select committee
Colin King Kaikōura 2005
  • Deputy Chair of the Primary Production select committee
Nicky Wagner 2005
  • Deputy Chair of the Local Government and Environment select committee
Simon Bridges Tauranga 2008
  • Deputy Chair of the Justice and Electoral select committee
Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga Maungakiekie 2008
  • Deputy Chair of the Commerce select committee
Todd McClay Rotorua 2008
  • Deputy Chair of Social Services Select Committee
Nikki Kaye Auckland Central 2008
  • Deputy Chair Government Administration Select Committee
Melissa Lee 2008
Tim Macindoe Hamilton West 2008
Paul Quinn 2008
Kanwal Singh Bakshi 2008
Louise Upston Taupō 2008
Michael Woodhouse 2008
Jonathan Young New Plymouth 2008
Aaron Gilmore 2008
Cam Calder June 2009–
Jami-Lee Ross Botany February 2011–
members of the National caucus who resigned, retired or died during the term of the 49th Parliament
Richard Worth 1999 – June 2009 (resigned) succeeded by Cam Calder
Pansy Wong Botany 1996 – 2011 (resigned) succeeded by Jami-Lee Ross
John Carter Northland 1987 – June 2011 (resigned) Became High Commissioner to Cook Islands
Allan Peachey Tāmaki 2005 – 6 November 2011 (died)
  • Chair of the Education and Science select committee

New Zealand Labour Party (42)[edit]

Name Electorate term in office responsibilities
Phil Goff Mount Roskill 19811990; 1993
  • Leader of the Opposition
  • Leader of the Labour Party
Annette King Rongotai 19841990; 1993
  • Deputy Leader of the Opposition
  • Deputy Leader of the Labour Party
Ross Robertson Manukau East 1987
  • Assistant Speaker
  • Deputy Chair of the Officers of Parliament select committee
Rick Barker 1993
  • Senior Whip
Steve Chadwick 1999
  • Junior Whip
Lianne Dalziel Christchurch East 1990
  • Chair of the Commerce select committee
David Parker 2002
  • Chair of the Government Administration select committee
Charles Chauvel 2006 –
  • Chair of the Regulations Review select committee
  • Chair of the Privileges Committee
Ruth Dyson Port Hills 1993
  • Deputy Chair of the Health select committee
Clayton Cosgrove Waimakariri 1999
  • Deputy chair of the Law and Order select committee
Trevor Mallard Hutt South 19841990; 1993
George Hawkins Manurewa 1990
Pete Hodgson Dunedin North 1990
Damien O'Connor 19932008; May 2009 -
Nanaia Mahuta Hauraki-Waikato 1996
David Cunliffe New Lynn 1999
Parekura Horomia Ikaroa-Rāwhiti 1999
Lynne Pillay 1999
Mita Ririnui 1999
Ashraf Choudhary 2002
Moana Mackey 2003 –
Darien Fenton 2005
Shane Jones 2005
Sue Moroney 2005
Maryan Street 2005
Su'a William Sio Mangere April 2008 –
Jacinda Ardern 2008
Carol Beaumont 2008
Brendon Burns Christchurch Central 2008
Clare Curran Dunedin South 2008
Kelvin Davis 2008
Chris Hipkins Rimutaka 2008
Raymond Huo 2008
Iain Lees-Galloway Palmerston North 2008
Stuart Nash 2008
Rajen Prasad 2008
Grant Robertson Wellington Central 2008
Carmel Sepuloni 2008
Phil Twyford 2008
David Shearer Mount Albert June 2009
Kris Faafoi Mana November 2010
Louisa Wall April 2011
members of the Labour caucus who resigned or retired during the term of the 49th Parliament
Helen Clark Mount Albert 1981 – 17 April 2009

resigned to become head of the United Nations Development Program; replaced by David Shearer

Michael Cullen 1981 – May 2009 replaced by Damien O'Connor
Winnie Laban Mana 1999– October 2010 Replaced by Kris Faafoi
Darren Hughes 2002 – April 2011 replacement by Louisa Wall

Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand (9)[edit]

Name Electorate term in office responsibilities
Metiria Turei 2002
  • Co-leader of the Green Party (May 2009–)
Russel Norman 2008 –
  • Co-leader of the Green Party
Kennedy Graham 2008
  • 'Musterer' (party whip)
Sue Kedgley 1999
Keith Locke 1999
Catherine Delahunty 2008
Kevin Hague 2008
David Clendon 2009 –
Gareth Hughes 2010 –
members of the Greens caucus who retired during the term of the 49th Parliament
Sue Bradford 1999–2009
Jeanette Fitzsimons 1996–2010
  • Co-leader of the Green Party (1995–2009)

ACT New Zealand (5)[edit]

Name Electorate term in office responsibilities
Rodney Hide Epsom 1996
  • Minister of Local Government
  • Minister for Regulatory Reform
  • Associate Minister of Education
John Boscawen 2008
  • Parliamentary Leader of the ACT Party
Heather Roy 2002
Roger Douglas 19691990; 2008
Hilary Calvert 2010 –
  • Party Whip
members of the ACT caucus who resigned or retired during the term of the 49th Parliament
David Garrett 2008–2010

Māori Party (4)[edit]

Name Electorate term in office responsibilities
Tariana Turia Te Tai Hauāuru 1996
  • Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector
  • Associate Minister of Health
  • Associate Minister of Social Development and Employment
  • Minister for Disability Issues
  • Co-leader of the Māori Party
Pita Sharples Tāmaki Makaurau 2005
  • Minister of Maori Affairs
  • Associate Minister of Education
  • Associate Minister of Corrections
  • Co-leader of the Māori Party
Te Ururoa Flavell Waiāriki 2005
  • Party whip
Rahui Katene Te Tai Tonga 2008
members of the Māori Party caucus who resigned or retired during the term of the 49th Parliament
Hone Harawira Te Tai Tokerau 2008–2011

United Future New Zealand (1)[edit]

Name Electorate term in office responsibilities
Peter Dunne Ōhariu 1984
  • Minister of Revenue
  • Associate Minister of Health
  • Deputy Chair of the Emissions Trading Scheme Review committee
  • Deputy Chair Standing Orders Select Committee
  • Parliamentary Leader of United Future Party

Jim Anderton's Progressive Party (1)[edit]

Name Electorate term in office responsibilities
Jim Anderton Wigram 1984
  • Parliamentary Leader of Progressive Party
  • Former Shadow Minister of Agriculture

Mana Party (1)[edit]

Name Electorate term in office responsibilities
Hone Harawira Te Tai Tokerau 2011 *Note: Previously sat until 20 May 2011, resumed his seat on 2 August 2011

Independent (1)[edit]

Name Electorate term in office responsibilities
Chris Carter Te Atatū 19931996; 1999
  • Former Deputy chair of the Education and Science select committee
  • Permanently Expelled from Labour Party Caucus and Party membership
  • Note: did not retain membership of any select committee positions during expulsion

By-elections during 49th Parliament[edit]

There were a number of changes during the term of the 49th Parliament.

Electorate and by-election Date Incumbent Cause Winner
Mount Albert 2009 13 June Helen Clark Resignation David Shearer
Mana 2010 20 November Winnie Laban Resignation Kris Faafoi
Botany 2011 5 March Pansy Wong Resignation Jami-Lee Ross
Te Tai Tokerau 2011 25 June Hone Harawira Resignation Hone Harawira

Summary of changes during term[edit]

  • Helen Clark resigned in April 2009 to take up a position as Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme. The resulting Mount Albert by-election was won by David Shearer on 13 June 2009.
  • Michael Cullen resigned in April 2009 to become the deputy chairman of New Zealand Post. He was replaced by the next person on the Labour Party's list, Damien O'Connor.
  • Richard Worth resigned in June 2009. He was replaced by the next person on the National Party's list, Cam Calder.
  • Sue Bradford resigned in October 2009. She was replaced by the next person on the Green Party's list, David Clendon.
  • Jeanette Fitzsimons resigned in February 2010. She was replaced by the next person on the Green Party's list, Gareth Hughes.
  • Chris Carter expelled from Labour Party caucus amidst expenses scandal in 2010 and, as of October 2010, was expelled from the Labour Party meaning his seat is one as solely an Independent MP.
  • David Garrett resigned from the ACT caucus in September 2010 and resigned from Parliament shortly after being replaced by Hilary Calvert.
  • Winnie Laban resigned in October 2010 to become Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Pasifika) at Victoria University of Wellington. The resulting Mana by-election was won by Kris Faafoi.
  • Pansy Wong resigned in January 2011 following questions and a Speaker's investigation into her use of Ministerial travel privileges. Her portfolios were transferred to Hekia Parata who was raised to Cabinet to replace her. The resulting Botany by-election was won by Jami-Lee Ross.
  • Hone Harawira resigned from the Māori Party in February 2011 following a recommendation by the party's Disciplinary and Disputes Committee that the party's National Council expel him. He resigned from Parliament as an Independent MP effective 21 May causing a by-election in Te Tai Tokerau. Harawira announced his intention to run as a candidate for the Mana Party. On 6 July 2011 the results of the official count of votes found Harawira won by a majority of 1117.
  • Darren Hughes announced his intention to resign in March 2011 following an alleged incident involving him. Louisa Wall became the replacement for Hughes from the List for the remainder of the 49th Parliament.
  • John Carter announced his resignation from politics in June 2011 in favour of a High Commissioner's post in the Cook Islands; he was replaced as a Minister by Craig Foss. As he resigned within six months of a general election, a by-election does not need to be held in his Northland seat.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b New Zealand Herald (3 May 2007). "Auckland to get an extra seat in Parliament". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  2. ^ 2008 GENERAL ELECTION – OFFICIAL RESULT