5-Inch Forward Firing Aircraft Rocket

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For a more recent rocket with the same acronym, see Mk 4/Mk 40 Folding-Fin Aerial Rocket.
5-Inch Forward Firing Aircraft Rocket
5in FFAR F4U MAG-33 Okinawa Jun1945.jpg
FFARs being loaded
Type Air-to-surface rocket
Place of origin United States
Service history
Used by United States military
Production history
Produced 1943-1945
Specifications (5-inch FFAR)
Weight 80 pounds (36 kg)
Length 5 feet 5 inches (1.65 m)
Diameter Warhead: 5 inches (130 mm)
Motor: 3.5 inches (89 mm)
Warhead High explosive
Warhead weight 45 pounds (20 kg)

Engine Solid-fuel rocket
Operational
range
1 mile (1.6 km)
Speed 485 miles per hour (781 km/h)
Guidance
system
None

The 5-inch Forward Firing Aircraft Rocket or FFAR was an American rocket developed during World War II for attack from airplanes against ground and ship targets.

Operational history[edit]

The first FFARs were developed by the U.S. Navy and introduced in June 1943. They had a 3.5-inch diameter and a non-explosive warhead, since they were used as an aircraft-launched ASW (Anti-Submarine Warfare) rocket and worked by puncturing the hull. It was accurate enough for use against surface ships and land targets, but these missions required an explosive warhead.[1] A 5-inch anti-aircraft shell was attached to the 3.5-inch rocket motor, creating the 5-Inch FFAR, which entered service in December 1943. Performance was limited because of the increased weight, limiting speed to 780 km/h (485 mph).[2] The High Velocity Aircraft Rocket, or HVAR, was developed to fix this flaw.[2]

A list of aircraft that used FFAR:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations
  1. ^ Parsch 2004
  2. ^ a b Parsch 2006
Bibliography
  • Parsch, Andreas (2004). "Air-Launched 3.5-Inch Rockets". Directory of U.S. Military Rockets and Missiles. designation-systems.net. Archived from the original on 15 December 2010. Retrieved 2011-01-24. 
  • Parsch, Andreas (2006). "Air-Launched 5-Inch Rockets". Directory of U.S. Military Rockets and Missiles. designation-systems.net. Archived from the original on 15 December 2010. Retrieved 2011-01-24. 

External links[edit]

Media related to FFAR rockets at Wikimedia Commons