5000 metres at the Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
5000 metres
at the Olympic Games
Mo Farah (5000m Olympic Final).jpg
The 2012 Olympic men's 5000 m final
Overview
Sport Athletics
Gender Men and women
Years held Men: 19122012
Women: 19842012
Olympic record
Men 12:57.82 Kenenisa Bekele (2008)
Women 14:40.79 Gabriela Szabo (2000)
Reigning champion
Men  Mo Farah (GBR)
Women  Meseret Defar (ETH)

The 5000 metres at the Summer Olympics has been contested since the fifth edition of the multi-sport event. The men's 5000 m has been present on the Olympic athletics programme since 1912. The 3000 metres was the first women's Olympic long-distance track event, making its initial appearance at the 1984 Olympics, and this distance was extended to match the men's event from 1996 onwards. It is the most prestigious 5000 m race at elite level. The competition format typically has two qualifying heats leading to a final between fifteen athletes.

The Olympic records for the event are 12:57.82 minutes for men, set by Kenenisa Bekele in 2008, and 14:40.79 minutes for women, set by Gabriela Szabo in 2000. At the inaugural 1912 Olympic 5000 metres, Hannes Kolehmainen set the first official IAAF world record for the event. However, this remains the only time that the 5000 metres world record has been broken in Olympic competition. The best time recorded for the women's Olympic 3000 m was 8:26.53 minutes by Tetyana Dorovskikh (then Samolenko) at the 1988 Seoul Olympics; the world record for that event was not improved during an Olympic race.

Only two athletes have won multiple titles in the event: Lasse Virén became the first with his back-to-back wins in 1972 and 1976, while Meseret Defar became the first woman to win two titles in 2012, having previously won in 2004. Three athletes have reached the podium on three occasions: Defar was also the 2008 bronze medallist, Tirunesh Dibaba won medals from 2004–2012, and Paavo Nurmi won medals in the period from 1920–1928. Historically, athletes in this event have also had success in the 10,000 metres at the Olympics. The winner of the men's Olympic 5000 m has completed a long-distance track double on eight occasions, the most recent being Mo Farah at the 2012 London Olympics. Tirunesh Dibaba is the only woman to complete this double, having done so at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Ethiopia is the most successful nation in the event, having taken six gold medals and thirteen medals in total. Finland is the next most successful, also with six gold medals, but with a total of twelve overall. Finland's period of great success in the 1920s and 1930s led to the wide usage of the nickname the Flying Finns; Kaarlo Maaninka was the last Finnish athlete to medal over 5000 m, in 1980. Kenya have also won twelve medals in the 5000 m, although John Ngugi is the only Kenyan to have won Olympic gold.

Medal summary[edit]

Men[edit]

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1912 Stockholm
details
 Hannes Kolehmainen (FIN)  Jean Bouin (FRA)  George Hutson (GBR)
1920 Antwerp
details
 Joseph Guillemot (FRA)  Paavo Nurmi (FIN)  Eric Backman (SWE)
1924 Paris
details
 Paavo Nurmi (FIN)  Ville Ritola (FIN)  Edvin Wide (SWE)
1928 Amsterdam
details
 Ville Ritola (FIN)  Paavo Nurmi (FIN)  Edvin Wide (SWE)
1932 Los Angeles
details
 Lauri Lehtinen (FIN)  Ralph Hill (USA)  Lauri Virtanen (FIN)
1936 Berlin
details
 Gunnar Höckert (FIN)  Lauri Lehtinen (FIN)  Henry Jonsson (SWE)
1948 London
details
 Gaston Reiff (BEL)  Emil Zátopek (TCH)  Wim Slijkhuis (NED)
1952 Helsinki
details
 Emil Zátopek (TCH)  Alain Mimoun (FRA)  Herbert Schade (GER)
1956 Melbourne
details
 Vladimir Kuts (URS)  Gordon Pirie (GBR)  Derek Ibbotson (GBR)
1960 Rome
details
 Murray Halberg (NZL)  Hans Grodotzki (EUA)  Kazimierz Zimny (POL)
1964 Tokyo
details
 Bob Schul (USA)  Harald Norpoth (EUA)  Bill Dellinger (USA)
1968 Mexico City
details
 Mohammed Gammoudi (TUN)  Kipchoge Keino (KEN)  Naftali Temu (KEN)
1972 Munich
details
 Lasse Virén (FIN)  Mohammed Gammoudi (TUN)  Ian Stewart (GBR)
1976 Montreal
details
 Lasse Virén (FIN)  Dick Quax (NZL)  Klaus-Peter Hildenbrand (FRG)
1980 Moscow
details
 Miruts Yifter (ETH)  Suleiman Nyambui (TAN)  Kaarlo Maaninka (FIN)
1984 Los Angeles
details
 Saïd Aouita (MAR)  Markus Ryffel (SUI)  António Leitão (POR)
1988 Seoul
details
 John Ngugi (KEN)  Dieter Baumann (FRG)  Hansjörg Kunze (GDR)
1992 Barcelona
details
 Dieter Baumann (GER)  Paul Bitok (KEN)  Fita Bayisa (ETH)
1996 Atlanta
details
 Vénuste Niyongabo (BDI)  Paul Bitok (KEN)  Khalid Boulami (MAR)
2000 Sydney
details
 Million Wolde (ETH)  Ali Saïdi-Sief (ALG)  Brahim Lahlafi (MAR)
2004 Athens
details
 Hicham El Guerrouj (MAR)  Kenenisa Bekele (ETH)  Eliud Kipchoge (KEN)
2008 Beijing
details
 Kenenisa Bekele (ETH)  Eliud Kipchoge (KEN)  Edwin Soi (KEN)
2012 London
details
 Mo Farah (GBR)  Dejen Gebremeskel (ETH)  Thomas Pkemei Longosiwa (KEN)

Multiple medalists[edit]

Rank Athlete Nation Olympics Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Viren, LasseLasse Viren  Finland (FIN) 1972–1976 2 0 0 2
2 Nurmi, PaavoPaavo Nurmi  Finland (FIN) 1920–1928 1 2 0 3
3= Ritola, VilleVille Ritola  Finland (FIN) 1924–1928 1 1 0 2
3= Lehtinen, LauriLauri Lehtinen  Finland (FIN) 1932–1936 1 1 0 2
3= Zátopek, EmilEmil Zátopek  Czechoslovakia (TCH) 1948–1952 1 1 0 2
3= Gammoudi, MohammedMohammed Gammoudi  Tunisia (TUN) 1968–1972 1 1 0 2
3= Baumann, DieterDieter Baumann  Germany (GER) 1988–1992 1 1 0 2
3= Bekele, KenenisaKenenisa Bekele  Ethiopia (ETH) 2004–2008 1 1 0 2
9 Bitok, PaulPaul Bitok  Kenya (KEN) 1992–1996 0 2 0 2
10 Kipchoge, EliudEliud Kipchoge  Kenya (KEN) 2004–2008 0 1 1 2
11 Wide, EdvinEdvin Wide  Sweden (SWE) 1924–1928 0 0 2 2

Medals by country[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Finland (FIN) 6 4 2 12
2  Ethiopia (ETH) 3 2 1 6
3  Morocco (MAR) 2 0 2 4
4  Kenya (KEN) 1 4 4 9
5  Germany (GER)[nb] 1 2 1 4
6  France (FRA) 1 2 0 3
7  Great Britain (GBR) 1 1 3 5
8  United States (USA) 1 1 1 3
9=  Czechoslovakia (TCH) 1 1 0 2
9=  New Zealand (NZL) 1 1 0 2
9=  Tunisia (TUN) 1 1 0 2
12=  Belgium (BEL) 1 0 0 1
12=  Burundi (BDI) 1 0 0 1
12=  Soviet Union (URS) 1 0 0 1
15  West Germany (FRG) 0 1 1 2
16=  Algeria (ALG) 0 1 0 1
16=  Switzerland (SUI) 0 1 0 1
16=  Tanzania (TAN) 0 1 0 1
19  Sweden (SWE) 0 0 4 4
20=  East Germany (GDR) 0 0 1 1
20=  Netherlands (NED) 0 0 1 1
20=  Poland (POL) 0 0 1 1
20=  Portugal (POR) 0 0 1 1

Women's 3000 metres[edit]

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1984 Los Angeles
details
 Maricica Puică (ROU)  Wendy Smith-Sly (GBR)  Lynn Williams (CAN)
1988 Seoul
details
 Tetyana Samolenko (URS)  Paula Ivan (ROU)  Yvonne Murray (GBR)
1992 Barcelona
details
 Yelena Romanova (EUN)  Tetyana Dorovskikh (EUN)  Angela Chalmers (CAN)

Multiple medalists[edit]

Rank Athlete Nation Olympics Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Dorovskikh, TetyanaTetyana Dorovskikh  Soviet Union (URS)
 Unified Team (EUN)
1988–1992 1 1 0 2

Medalists by country[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1=  Romania (ROU) 1 1 0 2
1=  Unified Team (EUN) 1 1 0 2
3  Soviet Union (URS) 1 0 0 1
4  Great Britain (GBR) 0 1 1 2
5  Canada (CAN) 0 0 2 2

Women's 5000 metres[edit]

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1996 Atlanta
details
 Wang Junxia (CHN)  Pauline Konga (KEN)  Roberta Brunet (ITA)
2000 Sydney
details
 Gabriela Szabo (ROU)  Sonia O'Sullivan (IRL)  Gete Wami (ETH)
2004 Athens
details
 Meseret Defar (ETH)  Isabella Ochichi (KEN)  Tirunesh Dibaba (ETH)
2008 Beijing
details
 Tirunesh Dibaba (ETH)  Elvan Abeylegesse (TUR)  Meseret Defar (ETH)
2012 London
details
 Meseret Defar (ETH)  Vivian Cheruiyot (KEN)  Tirunesh Dibaba (ETH)

Multiple medalists[edit]

Rank Athlete Nation Olympics Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Defar, MeseretMeseret Defar  Ethiopia (ETH) 2004–2012 2 0 1 3
2 Dibaba, TiruneshTirunesh Dibaba  Ethiopia (ETH) 2004–2012 1 0 2 3

Medalists by country[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Ethiopia (ETH) 3 0 4 7
2=  China (CHN) 1 0 0 1
2=  Romania (ROU) 1 0 0 1
4  Kenya (KEN) 0 3 0 3
5=  Ireland (IRL) 0 1 0 1
5=  Turkey (TUR) 0 1 0 1
7  Italy (ITA) 0 0 1 1

References[edit]

Participation and athlete data
Olympic record progressions
Specific

External links[edit]