510s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 5th century6th century7th century
Decades: 480s 490s 500s510s520s 530s 540s
Years: 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519
Categories: BirthsDeathsArchitecture
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

This is a list of events occurring in the 510s, ordered by year.

510[edit]

By place[edit]

Britannia[edit]

Europe[edit]

511[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Inventions[edit]

  • Aryabhata, Indian astronomer and mathematician, comes up with concepts of mathematical equations, one of which explains the rotation of the Earth on its axis. This concept is far ahead of its time and he is fairly accurate in his description of it. He also comes with a lot of other ideas about the Solar System but many of them are flawed because he considers the Earth to be the center of the universe, not the Sun. Aryabhata is often given credit for coming up with the number zero and using it as a placeholder.

Religion[edit]

512[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Literature[edit]

513[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

  • Revolt of Vitalian: Vitalian, Byzantine general, revolts against emperor Anastasius I and conquers a large part of the Diocese of Thrace. He gains the support of the local people and assembles an army of 50,000–60,000 men.
  • Anastasius I reduces taxes in the provinces of Bithynia and Asia to prevent them from joining the rebellion. Vitalian marched to Constantinople and encamps at the suburb of Hebdomon (modern Turkey).
  • Anastasius I sends an embassy under the former consul Patricius to start negotiations. Vitalian declares his aims: restoration of Chalcedonian Orthodoxy and the settling of the Thracian foederati.[1]
  • Vitalian accepts an agreement and returns with his army to Lower Moesia. After a few inconclusive skirmishes, Anastasius I sends a Byzantine army (80,000 men) under his nephew Hypatius.
  • Vitalian defeats the Byzantines at Acris (Bulgaria) on the Black Sea coast. He attacks their fortified Laager in darkness and in a crushing defeat kills a large part of the imperial army.

Persia[edit]

  • King Kavadh I adopts the doctrine of the Mazdakites and breaks the influence of the magnates (nobility). [2]
  • The Jewish community revolt at Ctesiphon against Mazdakism and establish an independent Jewish kingdom that last for seven years.[3]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


514[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

  • Vitalian, Byzantine general, marched again to Constantinople. A fleet of 200 vessels sails from the Black Sea ports and blockade the entrance of the harbor capital. Emperor Anastasius I is disquieted by riots in the city, which cost many casualties, and decides to negotiate with Vitalian.
  • Vitalian accepts the receipt of ransom money and gifts worth in total 5,000 pounds of gold for the release of Hypatius. He is a nephew of Anastasius I and is taken prisoner during the attack at Acris (see 513). Vitalian retreats his forces back to Lower Moesia.

Britannia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

515[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

516[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

517[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Science[edit]

518[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Balkans[edit]

Arabia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

519[edit]

By place[edit]

Britannia[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]



Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Martindale, Jones & Morris 1980, p. 840
  2. ^ Richard Nelson Frye, The History of Ancient Iran, Vol.3, (Beck'sche Verlangbuchhandlung, 1984), p. 323
  3. ^ http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0003_0_01807.html
  4. ^ Bury 1958a, p. 451
  5. ^ Bury 1958a, p. 451-452; Cameron, Ward-Perkins & Whitby 2000, pp. 57, 294
  6. ^ Bury 1958a, p. 452
  7. ^ http://www.abbaye-stmaurice.ch/home-home-english.html
  8. ^ "Beowulf on Steorarume". 
  9. ^ P. Brown, The world of late antiquity, W.W. Norton and Co. 1971 (p. 147)
  10. ^ Moorhead (1994), p. 21-22, with a reference to Procopius, Secret History 8.3.
  11. ^ Martindale & Morris (1980), p. 489
  12. ^ Shahîd 1989, p. 121, 125–127; Greatrex & Lieu 2002, p. 51