526th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Group

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526th ICBM Systems Group Air Force Materiel Command.png
USAF - 526th ICBM Systems Group.png
526th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Group emblem
Active 1942-1943, 1958-1961, 2005-present
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Role Missile Systems Development
Part of AFMC
Garrison/HQ Hill AFB, Utah

The 526th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Group (526 ICBMG) is an inactive United States Air Force (USAF) unit. It was last located at Hill AFB, Utah, where it was inactivated in 2010. The group was first activated during World War II to conduct anti-submarine warfare in the Caribbean and off the Atlantic seaboard of Georgia and Florida. It was again active during the Cold War as an Atlas missile wing. Its final period of active service was as a systems and sustainment organization for USAF missile systems.

History[edit]

World War II[edit]

The 526th ICBMG was first activated in 1942 as the 26th Antisubmarine Wing, a command organization for Army Air Forces Antisubmarine Command units in the Caribbean and South Atlantic. Its area of jurisdiction ranged from the Georgia/Florida border along the Atlantic Coast outward to approximately 100 miles eastward from coastline to the entire Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea from the Florida Straits south to the Venezuela coast. As the Army Air Forces turned responsibility for anti-submarine warfare over to the United States Navy in 1943, the wing was transferred to First Air Force and disbanded while its squadrons were transferred and redesignated bombardment squadrons.[1]

Cold War[edit]

706th Strategic Missile Wing insignia

The 706th Strategic Missile Wing (706 SMW) was established on 13 February 1958 at Francis E. Warren AFB, Wyoming.[2] Preparation for intercontinental ballistic missile operations at F.E. Warren began on 15 January 1958 when Air Research and Development Command established the Strategic Missile Wing (Provisional). On 1 February, Strategic Air Command took over F.E. Warren from Air Training Command and replaced the provisional wing with its Major Command controlled (MAJCON) 4320th Strategic Wing (Missile). The 4320th was a support organization, and was assigned the 389th Air Base Group to act as the host for units at F.E. Warren.[3]

The 706th replaced the 4320th almost immediately, assuming control of the 389th. Two operational squadrons were activated later that year; the 564th[4] and 565th Strategic Missile Squadrons (SMS).[5] It accepted its first two SM-65 Atlas missile complexes in August 1960, gaining initial operational capability. The same year a third operational squadron, the 549th Strategic Missile Squadron was assigned[6]

The 706th SMW was replaced by the 389th Strategic Missile Wing (ICBM-Atlas) and inactivated on 1 July 1961.[2] The 389th assumed the 706th mission, equipment and personnel, except for th 549th SMS, which moved to Offutt AFB, Nebraska.[6]

Logistics Unit[edit]

The next iteration of the Wing was as the 526th Special Operations Wing. In 2007, the wing was reduced to a group, and was made subordinate to the 508th Aerospace Sustainment Wing.

The ICBM System Program Office (SPO) develops, acquires, and supports silo-based ICBMs and provides program direction and logistics support as the single face to the customer. The SPO is responsible for acquisition, systems engineering and depot repair support; manages equipment spares; provides storage and transportation; and, accomplishes modifications and equipment replacement to maintain silo-based ICBM systems. The ICBM Prime Integration Contract (PIC) Program Management Office, LM(3), is charged with day-to-day execution and management of the PIC. The office is accountable to the System Program Director (SPD) for cost, schedule, and technical performance of the ICBM prime contractor. LM(3) supports the other SPO divisions by working with LMK-P to translate requirements for engineering services and/or modification/replacement programs into the necessary contracting actions.

Lineage[edit]

26th Antisubmarine Wing

  • Constituted as 26th Antisubmarine Wing on 17 November 1942
Activated on 20 November 1942
  • Disbanded on 15 October 1943
  • Reconstituted on 31 July 1985 and consolidated with the 706th Strategic Missile Wing as the 526th Special Operations Wing

706th Strategic Missile Wing

  • Constituted as 706th Strategic Missile Wing on 13 February 1958
Activated on 23 February 1958
Redesignated 706th Strategic Missile Wing (ICBM-Atlas) on 1 April 1958
  • Discontinued and inactivated on 1 July 1961.
  • Consolidated on 31 July 1985 with the 26th Antisubmarine Wing as the 526th Special Operations Wing

526th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Group

  • 526th Special Operations Wing formed on 31 July 1985 by consolidation of 26th Antisubmarine Wing and 706th Strategic Missile Wing (not active)
  • Redesignated 526th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Wing on 31 January 2005
Activated on 24 February 2005
Redesignated 526th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Group on 13 August 2007
  • Inactivated on 30 April 2010

Assignments[edit]

Components[edit]

Groups[edit]

  • 389th Air Base Group (later 389th Combat Support Group): 23 February 1958 - 1 July 1961
  • 389th USAF Hospital (later 389th Medical Group): 23 February 1958 - 1 July 1961
  • 526th Acquisition Group: 24 February 2005 - 13 August 2007[7][8]
  • 526th Flight Systems Sustainment Group: 24 February 2005 - 28 April 2006[7][9]
  • 526th Ground Systems Sustainment Group (later 526th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Sustainment Group): 24 February 2005 - 13 August 2007[7][8]
  • 556th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Sustainment Group: 28 April 2006 - 13 August 2007[8][9]
  • 826th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Group: 28 April 2006 - 13 August 2007[8][9]

Squadrons[edit]

Assigned to: Jacksonville Army Air Field, Florida
Operated from: Edinburgh Field, Trinidad
Assigned to: Miami Army Airfield, Florida
Operated from: Edinburgh Field, Trinidad
Assigned to: Jacksonville Army Air Field, Florida, Operated from: Drew Field, Florida and Batista Field, Cuba
Assigned to: Palm Beach County Park (Lantana Airport), Florida, Operated from: NAS Key West, Florida and Miami Army Air Field, Florida
Assigned to: Jacksonville Army Airfield, Florida
Operated from: Imeson Field, Florida, Opalocka NAS, Florida Drew Field, Florida Batista Field, Cuba
Assigned to: Drew Field, Florida Operated from: Langley Field, Virginia
Assigned to: Edinburgh Field, Trinidad (Ground echelon remained at Drew Field until 15 October 1943)
Detachment of air echelon operated from Zandery Field, Surinam, 15 August— December 1943
  • 79th Bombardment Squadron (later 8th Antisubmarine Squadron): 22 November 1942 - 14 October 1943 (attached to 25th Bombardment Group July - August 1943)[17]
  • 124th Observation Squadron: attached 20 November 1942 - 4 January 1943[18]
  • 500th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Sustainment Squadron: 13 August 2007 – 30 April 2010[8]
  • 509th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Squadron: 13 August 2007 – 30 April 2010[8]
  • 510th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Squadron: 13 August 2007 – 30 April 2010[8]
  • 511th Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Systems Squadron: 13 August 2007 – 30 April 2010[8]
  • 549th Strategic Missile Squadron: 1 October 1960 - 1 July 1961[6]
  • 564th Strategic Missile Squadron: 1 July 1958 - 1 July 1961[4]
  • 565th Strategic Missile Squadron: 1 December 1958 - 1 July 1961[5]
  • 706th Support Squadron (later 706th Missile Maintenance Squadron): 1 February 1959 - 1 July 1961

Stations[edit]

ICBM Supported[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1983) [1961]. Air Force Combat Units of World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. p. 389. ISBN 0-912799-02-1. LCCN 61060979. 
  2. ^ a b Ravenstein, Charles A. (1984). Air Force Combat Wings, Lineage & Honors Histories 1947-1977. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. pp. 294–295. ISBN 0-912799-12-9. 
  3. ^ Mueller, Robert (1989). Air Force Bases, Vol. I, Active Air Force Bases Within the United States of America on 17 September 1982. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. pp. 179–185. ISBN 0-912799-53-6. 
  4. ^ a b Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1982) [1969]. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. pp. 662–663. ISBN 0-405-12194-6. LCCN 70605402. OCLC 72556. 
  5. ^ a b Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 663
  6. ^ a b c Maurer, Combat Squadrons, pp. 652-653
  7. ^ a b c Research Division, Air Force Historical Research Agency, Air Force Organizational Status Change Report, February 2005
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Research Division, Air Force Historical Research Agency, Air Force Organizational Status Change Report, August 2007
  9. ^ a b c Research Division, Air Force Historical Research Agency, Air Force Organizational Status Change Report, April 2006
  10. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, pp. 781-782
  11. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 775
  12. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 789. Maurer indicates assignment until 1 December 1943, but the wing was disbanded before then,
  13. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 82
  14. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 783
  15. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 125
  16. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, pp. 120-121
  17. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 776
  18. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 349

Bibliography[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

External links[edit]